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f Museum of Modern Art 



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$1500°° Prize Winners in 



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5. CENTS 



50 Cents in Canada 











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anrom ^^^ 

Daddies or rue S 



JOAN 
CRAWFORD 




you 5,000,000 



TO GET MARRIED 



Qfotvs Qjour Sorealn ^Coday Y 



5,000,000 young women become of marriage- 
able age this year... How many 01 them, we 
wonder, will make the grade? 

One thing is certain; they can't exf>ect to 
attract and hold men it they have halitosis (un- 
pleasant breath). It nullifies every other charm. 



Everyone is likely to have halitosis at one 
time or another. vV hen that time comes, you 
won t realize it, because halitosis does not 
announce itself to its victim. 

vJ hy risk offending, when Listerine will 
f>ut you on the safe side? 



Simply rinse the mouth with it. Every morn- 
ing and every night, and between times before 
meeting others. Listerine instantly halts fer- 
mentation, the cause of QO% of mouth odors; 
then gets rid of the odors themselves. The 
breath becomes sweet and agreeable. 



USE LISTERINE BEFORE ALL SOCIAL ENGAGEMENTS 



Photoplay Magazine for January, 1934 




&L: 




£/£ FUR COAT COST HUNDREDS OF DOLLARS . . . BUT HER TEETH 
LOOK DINGY, HER GUMS ARE TENDER . . . AND SHE HAS "Pink Tooth Brush"! 



Do you suppose that this young 
woman, so smart in her fur coat and 
debonair hat, would go to a luncheon in 
dirty old gloves ripped at the seams? 
Or in shabby shoes a bit down-at-the- 
heels ? 

Yet her dingy teeth are just as conspic- 
uous — and just as disappointing! — as 
dog-eared gloves or shabby shoes could 
ever be! 

She brushes her teeth just as faithfully 
as you do. But she has yet to learn that 
if your gums are soft, with a tendency to 



bleed, you could brush your teeth seven 
times a day without restoring their right- 
ful heritage of sparkle. 

YOUR GUMS, AS WELL AS YOUR TEETH, 
NEED IPANA 

Today's soft, creamy foods, failing to ex- 
ercise the gums, fail also to keep the gums 
hard. And flabby gums soon show signs 
of tenderness. You find "pink" upon your 
tooth brush. 

It's serious — "pink tooth brush." Not 
only may it dull your teeth, but it may 



be the first step toward gingivitis, Vin- 
cent's disease, or pyorrhea. The soundest 
among your teeth may be endangered! 

Follow the advice of dental authorities: 
massage your gums. Do this by putting a 
little extra Ipana on your brush after you 
have cleaned your teeth, and rubbing it 
into those inert gums. 

Brighter — your teeth? You'll see! Soon 
you'll be pleasantly surprised in the im- 
provement in your gums, too. They'll be 
harder, healthier. And you can begin to 
feel safe from "pink tooth brush." 



THE "IPANA TROUBADOURS" ARE BACK! Afc 

EVERY WEDNESDAY EVENING, 9.00, E. S.T. 
WEAF AND ASSOCIATED N. B. C. STATIONS 



IPANA 

TOOTH PASTE 




BRISTOL-MYERS CO.. Dept.I-14 
73 West Street, New York, N. Y. 

Kindly send me a trial tube of IPANA TOOTH 
PASTE. Enclosed is a three-cent stamp to covet 
partly the cost of packing and mailing. 

Name 

Street 

City State 



Photoplay Magazine for January, 1934 



ft STAR TRIUMPH/ 

Now Comes the Year's Most Celebrated Hit! 



• MARIE DRESSLER 
•JOHN BARRYMORE 
•WALLACE BEERY 
•JEAN HARLOW 

• LIONEL BARRYMORE 

• LEE TRACY 

• EDMUND LOWE 

• BILLIE BURKE 

•MADGE EVANS •KAREN MORLEY 
•JEAN HERSHOLT •PHILLIPS HOLMES 



DINNER 



"DINNER AT 8" flames with 
drama . . . the fallen mat- 
inee idol . . . the millionaire's 
frivolous wife. ..the amorous 
doctor of the idle rich . . . 
stolen hours of romance 
. . . each thrilling episode 
played by a great STAR! 
No wonder it was Broad- 
way's advanced -price film 
sensation for three months. 
It is YOURS with a thousand 
thrills NOW!. 






OTO 




The World's Leading Motion Picture Publication 



Vol. XLV No. 2 



Kathryn Dougherty, Publisher 



January, 1934 



I 




Winners of Photoplay 
Magazine Gold Medal for 
the best picture of the year 

"HUMORESQUE" 

1921 

"TOL'ABLE DAVID" 

1922 

"ROBIN HOOD" 

"THE COVERED WAGON" 

"ABRAHAM" LINCOLN" 

"THE BIG PARADE" 

1926 

"BEAU GESTE" 

1927 

"7th HEAVEN" 

1928 

"FOUR SONS" 

1929 

"DISRAELI" 

1930 

"ALL QUIET ON THE 
WESTERN FRONT" 

1931 

"CIMARRON" 

1932 

"SMIL1N' THROUGH" 



Information and 
Service 

Brickbats and Bouquets 8 

Hollywood Menus .... 87 

Questions and Answers ... 90 

Addresses of the Stars . . . 113 

Casts of Current Photoplays . . 11<> 



High-Lights of This Issue 

Close-Ups and Long-Shots Kathryn Dougherty 25 

Phantom Daddies of the Screen V. L. Wooldridge 28 

The Amazing Story Behind Garbo's Choice of Gilbert Virginia Maxwell 32 

On the "Queen Christina" Set 34 

How Sylvia Changed Ruth Chattcrton's Nose and Figure . Sylvia 36 

Do Screen Stars Act Like Human Beings? . . Henry M. Fine 38 

Cal York's Monthly Broadcast from Hollywood 46 

Merry Ex- Wives of Hollywood Saba Hamilton 50 

Seymour— Photoplay's Style Authority 61 

Pinch Hitters That Came Through Ruth Rankin 69 

Winners of $1,500 for Movie Muddles 72 

"The Bowery" Premiere 74 

Star News from London Kathlyn Hayden 76 

Photoplay's Hollywood Beauty Shop . . . Carolyn Van Wyck 81 

Photoplay's Famous Reviews 

Brief Reviews of Current Pictures 6 

The Shadow Stage 56 

Personalities 

Twenty Years After By Fredric March as told to Cromwell MacKechnie 30 

"I'll Be at Doc Law's" Kihtley Baskette 31 

And Now Taps Sound for Tex ! Nina Remen 40 

Look Out, Jack, for "Ma"! Sara Hamilton 45 

Katharine Hepburn's Inferiority Complex . . Virginia Maxwell 52 

A Pair of Wuppermanns Judith Stone 54 

Constance Bennett o5 

The Clown Who Juggled Apples Jim Tully 60 

Lilian Harvey and Gene Raymond 71 

Buster Keaton . 78 

Design for Acting Ruth Rankin 79 

On the Cover — Joan Crawford — Painted by Earl Christy 



Published monthly by the Photoplay Publishing Co. 

Publishing Office, 919 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. Editorial Offices, 221 W. 57th St., New York City 

The International News Company, Ltd.. Distributing Agents, 5 Bream's Building, London, England 

Kathryn Dougherty, 

President and Treasurer 

John S. Tuomey, Vice-President Evelyn McEvilly, Secretary 

Yearly Subscription: $2.50 in the United States, its dependencies, Mexico and Cuba; S3.50 Canada; $3.50 for foreign countries. Remittances 

should be made by check, or postal or express money order. Caution— Do not subscribe through persons unknown to you. 

Entered as second-class matter April 24, 1912, at the Postoffice at Chicago, 111., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Copyright, 1933, by the Photoplay Publishing Company, Chicago 



Consult this pic- 
ture shopping 
guide and save 
your time, money 
and disposition 



Brief R 



eviews o 



r 



L^urrent Pictures 



•jf Indicates photoplay was named as one of the best upon Us month of review 



ACE OF ACES — RKO-Radio. — Richard Dix in a 
not-so-hot wartime aviation story. (Dec.) 

• ADORABLE — Fox. — Janet Gaynor in a gay, 
tuneful puff-ball about a princess in love with 
an officer of her army. Henry Garat's the officer — 
and he's a hit I Don't miss it. (Aug.) 

AFTER TONIGHT— RKO-Radio.— Connie Ben- 
nett's a Russian spy in love with Austrian officer 
Gilbert Roland; fast, exciting. (Dec.) 

AGGIE APPLEBY, MAKER OF MEN— RKO- 
Radio. — Country-boy Charles Farrell is made into a 
tough mug by bad-lady Wynne Gibson. Bill Gargan. 
You'll laugh and like it. (Dec.) 

ALIMONY MADNESS— Mayfair Pictures.— A 
badly butchered attempt to show up the alimony 
racket. (July) 

ANN CARVER'S PROFESSION— Columbia.— 

Fay Wray shows her competence aside from horror 
stuff, as a successful lawyer married to Gene Ray- 
mond. Gene gets into trouble; Fay must save him. 
Acceptable entertainment. (Sept.) 

• ANN VICKERS— RKO-Radio.— Irene Dunne 
in a finely acted tale of a social worker who 
loves but doesn't marry. Walter Huston, Bruce 
Cabot. Strictly for sophisticates. (Dec.) 

• ANOTHER LANGUAGE — M-G-M. — A 
slow-moving but superbly acted story of a bride 
(Helen Hayes) misunderstood by the family of hubby 
Bob Montgomery. The late Louise Closser Hale 
plays the dominating mother. (Oct.) 

ARIZONA TO BROADWAY— Fox.— Joan Ben- 
nett, Jimmie Dunn, and a good cast, wasted in a 
would-be adventure yarn about slicking the slickers. 
(Sept.) 

AVENGER, THE— Monogram.— Adrienne Ames 
and Ralph Forbes wasted on this one. (Dec.) 

BEAUTY FOR SALE— M-G-M.— An amusing 
tale about the troubles of girls who work in a beauty 
shop. Una Merkel, Alice Brady, Madge Evans, 
Hedda Hopper, others. (Nov.)i 

BED OF ROSES — RKO-Radio. — Ex-reform 
schoolgirls Connie Bennett and Pert Kelton out 
to beat life. Not for kiddies. (Aug.) 

BELOW THE SEA— Columbia.— A Fay Wray 
thriller; caught in a diving bell on a deep-seas ex- 
pedition this time. Diver Ralph Bellamy to the 
rescue. Good underseas shots and good fun. (Aug.) 

• BERKELEY SQUARE— Fox.— As subtly 
done as "Smilin' Through"; Leslie Howard 
thrown back among his 18th century ancestors. 
Heather Angel. (Sept.) 

BEST OF ENEMIES— Fox.— No great comeback 
for Buddy Rogers; he and Marian Nixon reconcile 
quarreling papas Frank Morgan and Joseph Caw- 
thorn. (Sept.) 

BIG BRAIN, THE— RKO-Radio.— Clever and 
fast, except in the climax. George E. Stone climbs 
from barber to phony stock magnate. Reginald 
Owen, Fay Wray. (Aug.) 

BIG EXECUTIVE— Paramount.— Ricardo Cor- 
tez, Richard Bennett, Elizabeth Young, wasted in 
another of these stock market tales. Weak storv. 
(Oct.) 

BITTER SWEET— United Artists.— A British 
musical, about a woman musician who lives on after 
her husband was killed defending her honor. It could 
have been stronger. (Nov.) 

6 



BLARNEY KISS, THE— British & Dominions- 
British restraint takes zip from this tale of an Irish- 
man who kisses the Blarney Stone, and then has great 
adventures in London. Well acted. (Nov.) 

BLIND ADVENTURE — RKO-Radio. — Ad- 
venturous Bob Armstrong tangled with Helen Mack, 
crooks, and a jovial burglar, Roland Young, in a 
London fog. But the plot is as badly befogged as the 
characters. (Oct.) 

• BLONDE BOMBSHELL. THE— M-G-M.— 
( Reviewed under the title "Bombshell".) Jean 
Harlow superb in an uproarious comedy of Hollywood 
life. Press-agent Lee Tracy makes her the hot 
"Bombshell"; she wants to lead the simple life. (Dec.) 

• BONDAGE — Fox. — Dorothy Jordan superb as 
a "misguided girl" ruined by cruel treatment at 
the hands of Rafaela Ottiano, matron of the so-called 
"reform" institution. Splendid treatment of a grim 
subject. (July) 



When in Doubt — 
Let Us Answer! 

If you want to know some 
particular about a favorite 
star, don't wonder and guess 
— write to us, and let us 
tell you! Our expert staff 
will be glad to answer any 
such questions. See the 
"Ask the Answer Man" 
page in this issue for parti' 
culars — and use this" free 
service as often as you like! 



• BOWERY, THE — 20th Century-United 
Artists. — Grand fun while Wally Beery as 
Chuck Connors and George Raft as Steve Brodie 
battle for leadership of the Bowery in old days. 
Jackie Cooper, Fay Wray. Don't miss it. (Dec.) 

BRIEF MOMENT — Columbia.— Night club 
singer Carole Lombard marries playboy Gene Ray- 
mond to reform him. It has snap and speed. (A' or.) 

BROADWAY THRU A KEYHOLE— 20th Cen- 
tury-United Artists. — Walter Winchell's melodrama 
of Gay White Way night life. Entertaining. (Dec.) 

• BROADWAY TO HOLLYWOOD— M-G-M. 
Frank Morgan, Alice Brady, others, in a finely- 
done life story of two vaudeville hoofers. No thrills, 
but supreme artistry. ( Nov.) 

BROKEN DREAMS — Monogram. — Buster 
Phelps shows how a little child can lead them; it's 
slightly hokey. (Dec.) 

BUREAU OF MISSING PERSONS— First Na- 
tional. — Good, stirring detective work by hard-boiled 
Pat O'Brien, directed by chief Lewis Stone. Bette 
Davis. (Nov.) 



CALLED ON ACCOUNT OF DARKNESS— 

Bryan Foy Prod. — This one has the themes, but not 
the punch, of some good baseball pictures. (Aug.) 

CAPTURED!— Warners.— Leslie Howard, Doug 
Fairbanks, Jr., captured aviators held by prison 
commander Paul Lukas. Fine acting; weak plot. 
(Sept.) 

CHANCE AT HEAVEN— RKO-Radio.— "Poor 
but noble" Ginger Rogers and rich Marian Nixon 
want Joel McCrea. Excellent playing makes this old 
plot highly appealing. (Dec.) 

CHARLIE CHAN'S GREATEST CASE— Fox. 

— Warner Oland in another delightful tale about the 
fat Chinese detective, and a double murder. Heather 
Angel. ( Nov.) 

CHEATING BLONDES— Equitable Pictures — 
A would-be murder mystery and sexer; it's neither. 
Thelma Todd. (Aug.) 

CHIEF, THE— M-G-M.— Ed Wynn in a filmful of 
his nonsense that's good at times and at others not so 
good. (Dec.) 

CIRCUS QUEEN MURDER, THE— Columbia- 
Sleuth Adolphe Menjou solves the murder of trapeze 
performer Greta Nissen. Grand circus; a wow finish. 
(July) 

COCKTAIL HOUR— Columbia.— Bebe Daniels, 
scorning "steady" Randolph Scott, tries Europe 
and a fling at "free" life. Entertaining, if not out- 
standing. (A ug.) 

COLLEGE HUMOR— Paramount. — Regulation 
movie college life. Jack Oakie as hero. Bing Crosby; 
Burns and Allen, Richard Arlen, Mary Kornman, 
good enough. (Sept.) 

CORRUPTION — Wm. Berke Prod. — Preston 
Foster as a boy mayor who crosses the bosses and 
cleans up the town. A novel murder twist. Evalyn 
Knapp good. (July) 

COUGAR, THE KING KILLER— Sidney Snow 
Prod. — Life as the official panther catcher for the 
State of California; good animal stuff. (Aug.) 

DANGEROUS CROSSROADS— Columbia. — 

Chic Sale does the locomotive engineer in a railroad 
thriller. For confirmed hokum addicts and Chic 
Sale's followers. (Sept.) 

DAS LOCKENDE ZIEL (THE GOLDEN 

GOAL)— Richard Tauber Tonfilm Prod.— Richard 
Tauber, as village choir singer who attains grand 
opera fame. His singing is superb. English captions. 
(Sept.) 

DAY OF RECKONING, THE— M-G-M — 

Richard Dix, Madge Evans, Conway Tearle, below 
par in an ancient tale of an embezzling cashier and a 
double-crossing friend. (Dec.) 

DELUGE — RKO-Radio. — Earthquakes, tidal 
waves, the end of the world provide the thrills here. 
Cast and story alike dwarfed bv the catastrophes. 
(Nov.) 

DEVIL'S IN LOVE, THE— Fox. — A shopworn 
Foreign Legion story; but Victor Jory, Loretta Young, 
David Manners, Vivienne Osborne, save it with fine 
acting. (Oct.) 

DEVIL'S MATE — (Also released under title "He 
Knew Too Much") — Monogram. — A good melo- 
drama about a murderer who was murdered so he 
couldn't tell what he knew. (Oct.) 

DIE GROSSE ATTRAKTION ("THE BIG 
ATTRACTION")— Tobis-Tauber-Emelka Prod- 
Richard Tauber's singing lends interest to this Ger- 
man film. English subtitles. (Oct.) 

[ PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 12 ] 



Photoplay Magazine for January, 1934 



7 







The star of the month- 
story from the book-of-the- 
month — makes the picture 
of the month, as Warner 
Bros, again team the author 
and star of "Little Caesar" 
. . . This roaring, real life 
drama of a"plunger"of the 
tracks, wagering body and 
soul — hazarding love and 
life, is hailed by a million 
readers as W. R. Burnett's 
greatest story. ..awaited by 
fifty million theatre-goers as 
Robinson's greatest picture! 



da r k mm RD 

A First National Picture with Genevieve Tobin • Glenda Farrell . Directed by Alfred E. Green 



1 he Audi 



lence 



lalks Back 



THE $25 LETTER 

Quite a while ago, there was a little girl, shy, 
self-conscious, and not particularly pretty, a 
lonely child with few friends. Wandering into 
a theater, she sat entranced through "7th 
Heaven." For weeks, she carried with her the 
words of the immortal Diane, the lesson she 
learned from Chico — "Never look down, al- 
ways look up — see what you've done for me." 
From the little Gaynor she learned not to be 
afraid, to be brave, to have courage and with 
courage all things are possible. 

Taking a touch of burning ambition from 
the self-made Crawford. Watching the in- 
comparable Shearer, she learned to have poise 
and self-assurance. Watching the breath- 
taking beauty of Marlene, the ethereal loveli- 
ness of Garbo, the lady-like Harding and the 
sweet sincerity of Hayes, she kept on learning. 

She isn't timid any longer, or lonely. She 
is popular now. She had, for the asking, the 
greatest teachers in the world. 

That little girl was I. 

A. M. Johnson, Pittsburgh, Penna. 

THE $10 LETTER 

A Western picture was being shown in a 
small West Virginia town. Near the front of 
the theater sat a "hill-woman" with her hus- 
band. A small child slept on her knee. Her 
whole being expressed hard work. 

Judging from her behavior, she had seen few 
pictures. Such absolute enjoyment I have 
never witnessed. The nearest comparison I 
can think of is the joy a child finds in a 
new toy, but even that does not describe her 
pleasure. When she had seen the show once, 
she refused to leave until she had seen it again. 
Her eyes sparkled and the blood coursed 
through her veins with such rapidity that her 
cheeks were glowing like a young girl's. 

When you have given bread to a hungry one 
ymi have fed his body, but when you have 
given a ticket for a movie to one whose life is 
devoid of beauty and culture, you have fed his 
soul. 

Zenith W. Young, Clendenin. W. Va. 



THE $3 LETTER 

Something simply must be done about Mae 
West! 

Her magnetic personality and that "Mid- 
way" dance is burning us up. 

Recently, one of Oklahoma City's theaters 
caught lire while Mae West was playing there 
in "I'm Xo Angel." Even the men had to 
come out! 

We can't have Mae burning our perfectly 
good theaters. 

Can't someone persuade her to turn off just 
a little of that heat? 

Madeline Ball, Oklahoma City, Okla. 

THAT GAL MAE 

"She done him wrong," and some folks say, 

"She's no angel, that gal called Mae." 

But she has "It" in every curve. 

And boys — those hips — how they can swerve! 

Her hair it shimmers, her legs are neat, 

She's the finest gal that you can meet. 

Her eyes are naughty but still quite nice, 
And does she glitter with all that ice! 
Her voice is husky, a slow, soft drawl — 
Its tone entices one and all. 
Her clothes are stunning. Not quite discreet? 
Well, neither are her charms effete. 
Mrs. Elizabeth J. Hill, Vancouver, B. C. 




In the background you see the 
crowd straining for a look at 
Mae West as she graciously 
posed for photographers at the 
premiere of "I'm No Angel" 



HTHEN along came "The West" — 

burning up our theaters, and such 
like. Whooie! How Mae did move 
in on Hollywood! Says she, "I'm No 
Angel." Says we, " 'S all right, we're 
convinced!" 

"Three Little Pigs" went to market, 
and sold us so completely on their 
product that we're all anxiety over 
each announcement of a new Walt 
Disney Silly Symphony. 

Music's in the air, and the motion 
picture public mean to keep it there. 
Never was there such a deluge of mail 
on one subject. They go right down 
the line of recent musical screen pro- 
ductions, quite unable to name any 
one in particular for top honors. But 
hoping for more, more, more! 

Readers' continual plaint is that 
"trailers," shown in advance of a pic- 
ture, ruin the suspense. Producers, 
don't reveal important plot details! 



When the audience speaks the stars and 
producers listen. We offer three prizes for 
the best letters of the month— $25, $10 and 
$5. Literary ability doesn't count. But 
candid opinions and constructive sugges- 
tions do. We must reserve the right to cut 
letters to fit space limitations. Address The 
Editor, PHOTOPLAY, 221 W. 57th St., 
New York City. 



AND A BIG PAIN! 

Fan critics, you give me a pain! For the 
last year you have been crying, "We're sick of 
those sexy pictures. Give us delightful, whole- 
some pictures like "Smilin' Through." 

Then along comes overstuffed, oversexed 
Mae West, who thinks all you have to do to 
become an actress is to swing your hips around, 
and you fall for it! 

Robert Bruce, Syracuse, N. Y. 

AND HOLD HIM 

Mae West deserves an unholy halo for her 
work in " I'm No Angel." She proves that she 
may and can get her man if she so desires. 

She tlaunts her diabolic plumage in no un- 
mistakable manner, leading willing victims to 
her shrine. And we are quite surprised to find 
a tear mingled with our laughter. 

Lenore Bolger, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

ALL OVER -THREE LITTLE PIGS" 

Three little girls near the front grow starry- 
eyed and "oh" and "ah" their childish delight, 
punctuating it with involuntary handclaps. 

The wrinkled, weather-beaten face of the old 
man in the threadbare suit on the aisle loses its 
bitter expression as though the memory of 
happier days has been jogged. 

High school girl whispers to high school boy 
friend: "Isn't it just too grand!" He nods an 
enthusiastic "Yes!" 

Madame Club Woman voices her apprecia- 
tion to her companion. 

The firm mouth of a weary spinster school 
teacher relaxes into a broad grin of genuine 
approval. 

A grimy little newsy says to his plump 
mania: "Ain't it a wow, Ma!" 

All over the theater these expressions of 
approval echo. Faces take on a happier ex- 
pression. The picture is ended, and the 
theater fairly rocks with applause. 

Never in my experience as usher have I seen 
evidence of such universal enjoyment as during 
the showing of Walt Disney's "Three Little 
Pigs." 

Helen E. Meyer, Detroit, Mich. 

A BARGAIN 

I believe I would buy Photoplay every 
month if it were fifty cents per copy. Because: 

There's a certain sense of dignity about the 
magazine, even to the quality of paper on 
which it is printed. 

While I am able to see very few motion 
pictures, backed by Photoplay's reviews, I 
can offer intelligent criticism on any r film. 

Seymour tips me off as to what will be worn 
(as well as what will not be worn!) next 
season. The beauty aids are aids. And Sylvia 
— whooey! 

Those interviews: Sara Hamilton's delight- 
fully intimate ones; Cal York's newsy gossip. 

And I often clip the coupons from the adver- 
tisements. 

What more could one want for twenty-five 
cents? 

Mary F. Abel, Kansas City, Mo. 
[ please turn to page 10 ] 



Photoplay Magazine for January, 1934 



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* CHARLOTTE HEArY 

as ' Alice'. . . and 

RICHARD ARLEN • ROSCO ATES 
GARY COOPER • LEON ERROL 
LOUISE FAZENDA • W. C. FIELDS 
SKEETS GALLAGHER • RAYMOND 
HATTON • EDWARD EVERETT 
HORTON • ROSCOE KARNS • MAE 
MARSH • POLLY MORAN • JACK 
OAKIE • EDNA MAY OLIVER • MAY 
ROBSON-CHARLIE RUGGLES- ALISON 
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If It's a PARAMOUNT PICTURE . . . It's the Best Show in Town 



1 he Candid Opinion Of 




Meet in films Louisa Alcott's "Little Women." Front to rear, Amy (Joan 
Bennett), Beth (Jean Parker), Jo (Katharine Hepburn), Meg (Frances Dee) 



Who could help it after seeing such fine 
pictures as "42nd Street," "The Masquer- 
ader," "Tugboat Annie," "The Bowery," 
"Footlight Parade," and "Paddy, the Next 
Best Thing"? 

Betty Loesch, Erie, Penna. 

MUSIC'S IN THE AIR 

Have just recently seen "Gold Diggers of 
1933," "Footlight Parade" and "Too Much 
Harmony"; and I'll say they are just what we 
need. Something to cheer and pep you up. 
Here's hoping we see many more pictures just 
like these. 

Rudy F. Bouteiller, Louisville, Ky. 

See a movie of song and dance and you will 
have seen as good as the average musical stage 
production, the only difference being that you 
will not have to dress up. 

Alice W. Newell, Boylston, Mass. 

BIG "PARADE" 

I have just seen " Footlight Parade." What 
a picture! What a cast! 

James Cagney and Joan Blondell are excel- 
lent as always. A grand team. 

M. H. Thompson, Pittsburgh, Penna. 

A COURSE IN ACTING 

Perhaps the most rabid movie fan in my 
acquaintance is my young cousin, aged twelve. 
Betty is a normal youngster, with an excep- 
tionally precocious mind, far beyond her fel- 
lows in school, yet interested in play like any 
child. 

She gains all sorts of ideas from her picture- 
going. 

One day she will slink around and speak 
gutturally, so we know she's been seeing 



[ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 8 ] 

TRAILERS KILL SUSPENSE 

A great deal of enjoyment in viewing pic- 
tures, for me, is the fact that I don't know how 
the picture is going to turn out. I have seen 
several pictures from which much of the sus- 
pense was taken away because I had previously 
seen the advertising trailer. 

In "Storm at Daybreak," for example, all 
the time I should have been wondering how the 
triangle was going to end, I knew from having 
seen the trailer that Walter Huston was going 
to drive the team into destruction. 

In "Mary Stevens, M. D.," all the while I 
was looking at that perfectly adorable baby, 
I knew he was going to die, and there have 
been numerous other instances when the 
trailer completely relieved a film of its im- 
portant thrill of suspense. 

Therese Clark, Los Angeles, Calif. 

MEG, JO, BETH AND AMY 

I was a "hotel child." Hugging my doll, I 
sat for hours alone in the lobby. One day I 
found four charming companions. They lived 
in a book called "Little Women," but they 
seemed like the sisters for whom I longed. 

They invited me into their friendly home 
circle and far more real they were than passing 
strangers with curious glances. I laughed, 
grieved and had secrets with them, and I am 
grateful that one lonely child, through them, 
found a world in which she had a happy place. 
How lovely the recollection, and now I am to 
meet again, through the medium of the screen, 

10 



these beloved girls who shared my youth. 
Javia Bromley, Oakland, Calif. 

DE BOW'RY 

Every old timer should see "The Bowery," 
if for no other reason than Pert Kelton. Go 
back to the good old days of your youth (I'm 
only seventy-four years young) — to the good 
old strains of Ta-Ra-Ra-Ra-Boom-De-Ay. 

Producers, take a tip from me. Give the 
public more Mae Wests and Pert Keltons. 
R. B. Sivertson, San Francisco, Calif. 

LOOKING FOR ROD 

Recently I viewed the weird production — 
"S. O. S. Iceberg" — that interesting tale of the 
frozen North. I found the picture most enter- 
taining. Important to me was the return of 
Rod LaRocque to American movies. He 
makes his small role so convincing. I am 
positive the public would like to see Rod's 
name in the bright lights again. 

W. J. Mathews, Chicago, 111. 

THINK WHAT YOU'VE MISSED 

For months my boy friend and I quarreled 
over movies — for you see, that has always been 
his hobby, but it was not mine. Whenever we 
had a date he invariably suggested the theater. 
While I enjoy a good picture, I was not the 
enthusiast; he was. Naturally, we had argu- 
ments. 

After attending at least two shows a week 
for a few months, I am now as much of a 
movie devotee as he. 




Does the movie public want Rod 
back for keeps? LaRocque as 
Prince Albert in an early 
talkie "One Romantic Night" 



M 



E 



ovie-goers iiiverywnere 



h 



Garbo. The next day she will be all sweet and 
lisping, a la Gaynor; the next dramatic, like 
Joan Crawford. 

But she has gained a certain poise through 
watching these screen people. Her manners 
are improving daily. The effect of the movies 
on this child is entirely beneficial. 

Helen Raether, Albion, Mich. 

OUR WEAKNESS 

Since seeing Lilian Harvey in "My Weak- 
ness," I have been studying the reactions of 
people who saw the picture. They say, 
"Wasn't she grand — a real sense of comedy," 
or " I loved her, so different, and what a relief !" 

We had practically no young, clever com- 
ediennes — until Lilian came along. She's per- 
fect. 

Nana Staley, Springfield, 111. 

A PRIZE PUMPKIN? 

What in the name of this-and-that is all the 
fuss over Lilian Harvey for? To me she is just 
a prize pumpkin and I hate pumpkins. As for 
her being able to take Janet Gaynor's place — 
why, it just isn't being done. Why? Because 
it is impossible. Janet is Our Janet and always 
will be. She's mighty catching! 

Beverly Hook, Augusta, Ga. 

WELL WORTH THE EFFORT 

After reading the various criticisms about 
the talkies, may a mere farm woman speak 
from the other side of the fence? 

I find nothing wrong with the talkies. 

I think the stars — every one of them — are 
fine. Each one contributes something to my 
craving for beauty, culture and entertainment. 
Where else in the world could a farm wife get 
more enjoyment, more zest for work, more pep 




Most folks liked the idea of a change in comedy diet. Others couldn't see 
Lilian Harvey in "My Weakness." Our comedienne as a Spanish senorita 




His first screen work was in 
Warners "I Loved a Woman." 
And, already, readers are shouting 
praises for George Blackwood 



to keep on, than at a talkie! The stars have 
kept me in touch with the right kind of clothes, 
the proper setting of furniture, correct posture, 
etiquette. I've often left a talkie humming 
some gay modern tune. 

I've copied their coiffures, their clothes and 
relived with them romance. I'm never too 
tired to drive miles to a talkie! 

Mrs. F. Cecrle, North Judson, Ind. 

LULLABY LAND 

I have just seen Walt Disney's "Lullaby 
Land," done in Technicolor, three times, and 
I could see it many times more and not tire of 
its lovable baby hero and his adoring pal, the 
gingham dog. 

When the title flashed on the screen, I 
thought. "Just another dull feature," and 
settled down in my seat for a possible doze. In 
two minutes I was sitting upright, enjoying 
thoroughly the quaint figures, delightful color- 
ing, excellent music, and becoming quite 
breathless over baby's journey into Forbidden 
Land. 

Mrs. W. H. Rager, Jr., Youngstown, Ohio 

INNOVATION 

While driving through Camden, New Jersey, 
we came upon something new — a "drive in 
theater." 

We stopped, and together with many other 
motorists, sat in the car and saw an old talkie. 
The picture itself was not good. But we ex- 
perienced the thrill of something different 
nevertheless. 

Mrs. H. J. Simon, New York City 



PARADISE "FOUND" 

True, the average screen play with its 
glamour and glitter and romance is apt to form 
in the mind, especially of the young, a false 
picture of life, to transform this "cold, cruel 
world" into a bright, carefree place. But even 
a Fool's Paradise is better than no Paradise at 
all! 

Ralph Garcia, Trinidad, B. W. I. 

IN YOUR OWN BACKYARD 

A young juvenile now in Hollywood who 
seems to be quite definitely a screen find is 
George Blackwood. 

I have seen him on the Broadway stage, and 
in the Edward G. Robinson picture, "I Loved 
A Woman," and with his acting ability and 
charming screen presence think he should go 
far. 

I sincerely hope he will not be ignored as so 
many other potential stars have been. 

Toby Wing and Mary Carlisle have definite 
possibilities. 

Perhaps the producers will one day learn 
that new faces like the bluebird of happiness 
are waiting right in their own backyard. 

Bert Hughes, New York City 

THE DADDY OF THEM ALL 

Photoplay has given us a "new deal" in 
reading matter. 

We've watched the complete metamorphosis 
of this magazine from the ordinary garden 
variety of its type, way back in 1916, into the 

[ PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 14 ] 

11 



Brief Reviews of Current Pictures 



[ CONTINUED FKOM PAGE 6 



• DINNER AT EIGHT— M-G-M.— Another 
"all star" affair; they're invited to dinner by 
Lionel Barrymore and wife Billie Burke. ><iphisti- 
cated comedy follows. (Aug.) 

DIPLOMANIACS — RKO- Radio. — Wheeler and 
Woolsey as delegates to the Peace Conference. Good 
in some spots, awful in others; lavish girl display. 
(.July) 

DISGRACED — Paramount. — Not a new idea in 
a carload of this sort of stuff. Mannikin Helen 
Twelvetrees; rich scamp Bruce Cabot; enough said. 
(Sept.) 

DOCTOR BULL— Fox.— Will Rogers brings per- 
sonality to the tale of a country doctor struggling 
with a community that misunderstands; mild, except 
for Will. (Nov.) 

DON'T BET ON LOVE— Universal.— So-so; 
Lew Ayres wild about race-horses; sweetheart Ginger 
Rogers feels otherwise. Ends well, after some race 
stuff. (Sept.) 

• DOUBLE HARNESS— RKO- Radio.— Scintil- 
lating sophistication, with Ann Harding wan- 
gling rich idler Bill Powell into marriage, and mak- 
ing him like it. (Sept.) 

DREI TAGE MITTELARREST (THREE DAYS 
IN THE GUARDHOUSE)— Allianz Tonfilm Prod. 
— Excellent comedy situations when the mayor's maid 
seeks the father of her child. German dialogue. (A ug.) 

• EAGLE AND THE HAWK, THE— Para- 
mount. — The much used anti-war theme of the 
ace who cracks under the strain of killing. Fredric 
March superb; fine support by Cary Grant, Jack 
Oakie, others. (July) 

EMERGENCY CALL — RKO-Radio. — Another 
hospital, gangster, doctor-and-nurse medley, led by 
Bill Boyd and Wynne Gibson. Fair, but spotty. (July) 

EMPEROR JONES, THE— United Artists — 
The great Negro actor Paul Robeson, in a filming of 
his phenomenal stage success about a Pullman porter 
who won rulership of a Negro republic. (Dec.) 

ESKIMO — M-G-M. — A gorgeous picture of life in 
the Arctic, and Eskimos tangling with white man's 
law. Eskimo actors; a treat for all who like the un- 
usual. (Dec.) 

EVER IN MY HEART— Warners.— Barbara 
Stanwyck in a too-horrible tale about persecution of 
herself and hubby Otto Kruger as German-Americans 
during the World War. (Dec.) 

FAITHFUL HEART — Helber Pictures.— Not 
even Herbert Marshall and Edna Best could make 
anything of this. ( Nov.) 

FIDDLIN'BUCKAROO.THE— Universal.— Ken 
Maynard and horse Tarzan in a dull Western. (Sept.) 

FIGHTING PARSON, THE— Allied-First Divi- 
sion. — Hoot Gibson tries comedy, as a cowboy be- 
decked in the garb of a parson. Not exactly a comic 
riot, nor is it good Western. (Oct.) 

FLYING DEVILS, THE— RKO-Radio.— Jealous 
hubby Ralph Bellamy, owner of an air circus, tries 
to crash Eric Linden. Eric's brother, Bruce Cabot, 
sacrifices himself in air battle with Bellamy. (Aug.) 



• FOOTLIGHT PARADE Warners— Not as 
much heart appeal as the earlier Ruby Keeler- 
Dick Powell "backstage" romances, but it has Jimmy 
Cagney. He's grand, and the specialty numbers are 
among the finest ever done. (Dec.) 

F. P. 1.— Fox-Gaumont British-UFA.— A well- 
done and novel thriller, about a floating platform 
built for transatlantic airplanes. Conrad Veidt, 
Leslie Fenton, Jill Esmond. (Oct.) 

FORGOTTEN MEN— Jewel Prod.— Official war 
films from fourteen countries; nothing too strong to 
put in. Fine if you can stand seeing what really 
happened. (A ug.) 

FROM HEADQUARTERS— Warners.— A grip- 
ping murder mystery, showing real police methods for 
a change. (Dec.) 

GAMBLING SHIP— Paramount.— A good idea 
gone wrong; Cary Grant, Benita Hume, in a badly 
worked out gangster piece. (A ug.) 

GIRL IN 419, THE— Paramount— Sexandadven- 
ture in a hospital, when gangsters William Harrigan 
and Jack LaRue try to silence Gloria Stuart, patient 
of head surgeon Jimmie Dunn. Fast-stepping; well 
done. (July) 

• GOLD DIGGERS OF 1933— Warners.— 
Another and even better "42nd Street," with 
Ruby Keeler, Dick Powell, Joan Blondell, in charge 
of the fun. A wow musical. (Aug.) 

GOLDEN HARVEST — Paramount. — Farmer 
Dick Arlen grows wheat; brother Chester Morris is a 
Board of Trade broker; a farmers' strike brings the 
climax. A strong film. (Dec.) 

GOOD COMPANIONS, THE— Fox-Gaumont- 
British. — A mildly pleasing English tale of trouping 
in the provinces. (Dec.) 

GOODBYE AGAIN— Warners.— Good, if not 
howling, farce. Author Warren William pursued by 
ex-sweetie Genevieve Tobin; he's for Joan Blondell. 
(Sept.) 

GOODBYE LOVE — RKO-Radio. — Charlie 
Ruggles in a would-be comedy that's really a messy 
mixture of unsavory material. (Dec.) 

HE KNEW TOO MUCH— Monogram.— Also re- 
leased as "Devil's Mate." See review under that 
title. (Oct.) 

HEADLINE SHOOTER— RKO-Radio.— News- 
reel man William Gargan rescues reporter Frances 
Dee, in an acceptable thriller with a new twist. 
(Sept.) 

HELLO SISTER — Fox. — Jimmie Dunn and Boots 
Mallory in a formula plot— scandal makers cause 
trouble, the truth comes out, etc. ZaSu Pitts helps a 
lot. (July) 

HELL'S HOLIDAY— Superb Pictures.— Another 
assemblage of official war film — with the usual anti- 
war conversation added. Otherwise, acceptable and 
interesting. (Oct.) 

HER BODYGUARD— Paramount.— Showgirl 
Wynne Gibson's so pestered, she hires Eddie Lowe 
as bodyguard. Good enough fun from there on. 
(Sept.) 



• HER FIRST MATE— Universal.— ZaSu Pitts 
tries to make a big time mariner out of Slim 
Summerville who's supposed to be first mate, but 
who is really selling peanuts, on the Albany night 
boat. Una Merkel helps scramble up the hilariously 
funny plot. (Oct.) 

HEROES FOR SALE— First National.— Boo 
hoo! It's just too awful — all that happens to ex- 
soldier Dick Barthelmess! (Aug.) 

HIGH GEAR— Goldsmith Prod.— An auto racing 
driver thought to be yellow. Don't bother. (July) 

HIS PRIVATE SECRETARY— Showmens Pic- 
tures. — An Evalyn Knapp romance with John Wayne. 
Distinctly better than most films in which Evalyn 
has appeared. (Oct.) 

HOLD ME TIGHT— Fox.— Another Jimmie 
Dunn-Sally Eilers opus, poor boy besting the villain, 
they live happily, etc. (A ug.) 

• HOLD YOUR MAN— M-G-M.— Clark Gable 
and Jean Harlow; both crooked to start, both 
go straight for love. Not another "Red Dust," but 
good enough. (Sept.) 

*"I COVER THE WATERFRONT"— United 
Artists. — The late Ernest Torrence, a fisher- 
man who smuggles Chinamen, exposed when reporter 
Ben Lyon wins Ernest's daughter, Claudette Colbert. 
Good melodrama. (July) 

I HAVE LIVED— Chesterfield.— Alan Dinehart, 
Anita Page, others, help this obvious tale about a 
playwright and a woman of easy virtue. ( Nov.) 

I LOVE THAT MAN— Paramount.— Nancy Car- 
roll sticks to con-man Eddie Lowe, and all but reforms 
him when he gets double-crossed and killed. Accept- 
able. (July) 

*I LOVED A WOMAN— First National— Ed- 
ward G. Robinson, as a rich Chicago meat- 
packer, finds his life torn between wife Genevieve 
Tobin and opera singer Kay Francis. Excellent and 
"different." ( Nov.) 

I LOVED YOU WEDNESDAY— Fox.— Life and 

loves of dancer Elissa Landi. Victor Jory throws her 
over; Warner Baxter loves her. Pleasant; not grip- 
ping. (Sept.) 

• I'M NO ANGEL.— Paramount.— It's Mae 
West, and how! Sizzling, wise-cracking. This 
one simply wows audiences. There's Cary Grant, but 
Mae's all you'll see. (Dec.) 

INDIA SPEAKS— RKO-Radio.— Richard Halli- 
burton gives a personally conducted exposure of the 
caste system and some adventure. We're doubtful. 

(July) 

INTERNATIONAL HOUSE — Paramount. — A 
riot of gags, put over by W, C. Fields and others, 
while Stu Erwin tries to buv a Chinese invention. 

{July) 

IT'S GREAT TO BE ALIVE— Fox. — Perhaps 
squirrels who see this will think so; most audiences 
won't. Herbert Mundin, Edna May Oliver help 
some. (Sept.) 

[ PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 16 ] 



Photoplays Reviewed in the Shadow Stage This Issue 

Save this magazine — refer to the criticisms before you pick, out your evening's entertainment. Make this your reference list. 



Page 

Before Dawn— RKO-Radio 109 

Blood Money — 20th Century-United 

Artists 109 

Christopher Bean— M-G-M 59 

College Coach — Warners 59 

Cradle Song — Paramount 58 

Dance, Girl, Dance — Invincible 109 

Der Sohn Der Weissen Berge — Itala 

Film 110 

Design for Living- — Paramount 56 

Duck Soup— Paramount 58 

Female — First National 58 



Page 

Havana Widows — First National 56 

Hell and High Water — Paramount . . . . 109 

Hoopla — Fox 58 

House on 56th Street, The — Warners. . 57 

Invisible Man, The — Universal 109 

King for a Night— Universal 58 

Little Women— RKO-Radio 56 

Lone Cowboy — Paramount 110 

Mad Game, The — Fox 58 

My Lips Betray — Fox 109 

My Woman — Columbia 59 

Olsen's Big Moment — Fox 109 



Page 

Only Yesterday — Universal 57 

Police Car 17 — Columbia 110 

Prizefighter and the Lady, The — 

M-G-M 57 

Quatorze Juillet — Protex Pictures 110 

Rider of Justice — Universal 110 

Son of a Sailor — First National 59 

Special Investigator — Universal 110 

Take a Chance — Paramount 59 

Vinegar Tree, The— M-G-M 109 

White Woman — Paramount 59 



12 



Photoplay Magazine for January, 1934 



l 3 



cJityicvte i/n mz cmema hmwu 
jew Miinma Ata/Qinlwv biuutml 



,' SAMUEL dOLDWYN 

PRODUCTIONS 





AX ROMAN 

^ SCANDALS 




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Your Eddie! Our Eddie! Every- 
body's Eddie! Now a crashing 
charioteer! Burning up Romewith 
laughs, lions, lovely ladies, lilting 
lyrics! One big Roman Holiday! 



RUTH ETTING 
GLORIA STUART 
DAVID MANNERS 

ond the 
NEW GOIDWYN GIRIS 



As the Parisian daughter of 
voluptuousness from Zola's 
magic pages, she has a role 
magnificently matching her 
superb artistry. America 
awaits, with expectant thrill, 
this, her first American picture. 



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Released thru 
UNITED ARTISTS 




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The Three Hacketts, Frank Morgan, 
Alice Brady, Jackie Cooper, about 
to put on their act, in "Broadway to 
Hollywood," story of backstage life 



[ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 11 ] 

smart, scintillating and thoroughly matured 
product of today. It resembles, to a certain 
extent, the startling transition of a Crawford 
or a Swanson from their initial awkwardness 
and uncertainty to the brilliant, soigne 
creatures we behold on the screen today. 

We find amusing, and not a little pathetic, 
the agility with which other monthlies hasten 
to copy each innovation of Photoplay, as, for 
example, the beauty department, prize con- 
tests, fashion displays, and even the date of 
publication. 

Marion McClory, Paterson, N. J. 

QUITE SO 

We all know that producers try to give the 
public what it wants, but it is only once in a 
great while that a picture like "One Man's 
Journey," with that gifted actor, Lionel Barry- 
more, makes an appearance. 

Here is a story of human nature at its best 
that will please many and will be long re- 
membered. 

Harry E. Myers, Hornell, N. Y. 



LET THERE BE LIGHT 

Darkness . . . and then came the dawn. 

Day after day, week after week, I walk in 
the shadow of the mine, hemmed in by black 
walls — covered with earth — and the irritation 
of dust in my nostrils. With the earth above, 
the darkness beneath, I am buried alive! 
Despite the darkness, light creeps upon the 
deadly shadows of night — then dawn! 

Once each month I visit my home town and 
again I breathe and live. My only spark of 
life keeps burning to see my world of pleasure 
— the motion picture theater. The films place 
me in a cheerful and entertaining life. A life 
full of contentment. 

E. I. U., Harrisburg, Penna. 

JUST EVERYTHING 

I want everybody to hear my applause for 
"Broadway to Hollywood." This picture has 
everything — comedy, drama, music, beauty. 
Alice Brady is superlative and, incidentally, 
women can learn much from the role she 
portrays. 

Madge Evans, as always, is lovely. 

This is a picture that does not leave you 
cold— you laugh uproariously and cry despite 
yourself. 

Mary H. Furman, E. Orange, N. J. 

AWE-INSPIRING 

There is a strange fascination about the 
movies. A fascination difficult to analyze. It 
lies partly, I think, in the continuous darkness 
where one has the marvelous facility of passing 
from one place to another. Seeing life in 
Europe, shopping in London, being gay in 
Paris, having a peep at Monte Carlo. 

There is a breathlessness about it all, a need 
to crowd every kind of experience into a few 
short hours. It's with a sigh of contentment 
I come back to real life leaving behind the 
fragment of a vanished experience or a future 
hope, in the charmed atmosphere of the movies. 
B. H. Smith, East Portchester, N. Y. 




The country doctor (Lionel Barrymore) of "One Man's Journey" has won us 
all. This happy group (with May Robson) are having a real celebration 



U 



Photoplay Magazine for January, 1934 



COME TAKE A JOY RIDE Ti 



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. Thrilling stars, ea -ng ^ rayish , n 

and gorgeous g-r I. ' exC iting revel 

DOLORES ML^WO 

GENE RAYMOND s RA REDASTAl RE 
GINGER ROGERS 

An RKO Radio «*J *- *J^. duce r 
MEWANC.COOPE producer 

Louis Brock, Ass ^ ^ 

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FRED ASTAIRE GINGER ROGERS 



i6 



Photoplay Magazine for January, 1934 



A Christmas 

GIFT 

Twelve Times 



' II "HERE are several reasons why a 
subscription to Photoplay Maga- 
zine is such an ideal Christmas gift. 
Not only does it continue its pres- 
ence month after month — long after 
the holly and mistletoe are forgotten 
— but its welcome is absolute. You 
know it will please. 

C[ In these days when everyone is 
interested in motion pictures, the gift 
of a magazine that reveals the inside 
of the art and industry — every month 
— is assured the keenest welcome. 
Photoplay has the brightest person- 
ality stories, the most appealing il- 
lustrations and the most reliable in- 
formation about the stars and their 
pictures. 

Beautiful Gift 
Announcement Card 

With each subscription you will re- 
ceive a beautiful card to sign and mail. 
or if you prefer hand to your friend 
Christmas Morning. 

Send— 

#1.00 for 5 months. 

2.50 for 1 year. 

4.00 for 2 years. 

4.00 for 2 1-year subscriptions. 

2.00 for each extra Gift Subscription. 

For Foreign and Canada send $1.00 in ad- 
dition to above for each yearly subscription, 
or 50c additional for each 5-month sub- 
scription. 

Mail Special Blank Below — to 

Photoplay Magazine, Dept. i-cs, 

919 No. Michigan Ave., Chicago, III. 

PHOTOPLAY MAGAZINE, Dept. 1 -CS, 
919 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 

I want to take advantage of your offer and en- 
close $ (Q Check □ Money order) 

for subscription to Photoplay: 

UeogOi of subscription) 

Send to 

Address 

City State 

□ New □ Renewal 



Brief Reviews of Current Pictures 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 12 ] 



My Name 

Address 

City State 

□ New □ Renewal 

Use regular stationery to list additional subscrip- 
tions. 



JENNIE GERHARDT — Paramount. — Sylvia 
Sidney's ".rand acting saves a slow telling of the 
Dreiser tale about a girl who, unwedded, loved her 
man throughout life. (A ug.) 

KENNEL MURDER CASE, THE— Warners.— 
William Powell in another Philo Vance murder mys- 
tery; smoothly done and entertaining. (Dec.) 

KING OF THE ARENA— Universal.— A first- 
rate Western with Ken Maynard. (July) 

LADIES MUST LOVE— Universal— A "gold-dig- 
gi -r" partnership breaks up when June Knight really 
falls for Neil Hamilton. Thin, but it has good spots. 
( Nov.) 

• LADY FOR A DAY— Columbia.— Apple- 
woman May Robson thought a society dame 
by her daughter; a stage crowd throws a party to 
save the day. Fine fun. (Sept.) 

LAST TRAIL, THE — Fox. — A Zane Grey 
Western with racketeers instead of rustlers, and speed 
cops in place of cowboys. The changes don't help it. 
{.Oct.) 

LAUGHING AT LIFE— Mascot Pictures.— A 
well-done Richard Harding Davis type of tale about 
soldier of fortune Victor McLaglen raising cain in a 
banana republic. (A ug.) 

LIFE IN THE RAW— Fox.— George O'Brien and 
Claire Trevor in a Western enriched with new ideas. 

(i hi.) 

LILLY TURNER— First National.— Inexcusable 
sex. with Ruth Chatterton going from bad to worse 
as a side-show performer. Worth avoiding. (July) 

LONE AVENGER, THE— World Wide.— The big 
bank robbery is the burden of this Ken Maynard 
Western. Youngsters won't be disappointed. (Sept.) 

LOVE, HONOR AND OH, BABY!— Universal. 
— (Reviewed under the title "Sue Me.") Shyster 
lawyer Slim Summerville tries to frame ZaSu Pitts' 
sugar-daddv. Riotously funny, after a slow start. 
( Nov.) 

LUCKY DOG— Universal.— Canine actor Buster 
turns in a knockout performance, as faithful compan- 
ion to "out of luck" Chic Sale (cast as a voting man). 
(My) 

• MAMA LOVES PAPA— Paramount.— Lowly 
Charlie Ruggles is made park commissioner; 
involved with tipsy society dame Lilyan Tashman. 
Great clowning. (Sept.) 

MAN FROM MONTEREY, THE— Warners.— 
John Wayne in a historical Western about Cali- 
fornia when Uncle Sam took possession in '49. Will 
appeal largely to the youngsters. (July) 

MAN OF THE FOREST— Paramount.— Far from 
being a topnotch Western. Randolph Scott, Verna 
Hillie, Noah Beery. Good work done by a mountain 
lion. (Sept.) 

MAN'S CASTLE — Columbia. — A deeply moving 
tale of vagabond Spencer Tracy and his redemption 
by Loretta Young's love. (Dec.) 

• MAN WHO DARED, THE— Fox— Life story 
of the late Mayor Cermak of Chicago, from an 
immigrant boy in a coal mine to his assassination at 
the side of President Roosevelt. Fine cast, Preston 
Foster in the lead. (Oct.) 

MARY STEVENS, M.D.— Warners.— Slow tale 
of two doctors (Kay Francis. Lyle Talbot) who love, 
have a baby, but won't marry. (Sept.) 

• MAYOR OF HELL, THE— Warners.— Gang- 
ster Jimmy Cagney steps into a tough reform 
school, and with help of inmate Frankie Darro, makes 
things hum. Madge Evans. (Aug.) 

MEET THE BARON— M-G-M.— Jack Pearl's 
film version of his radio nonsense about Baron Mun- 
chausen. Grand support; often hilarious. (Dec.) 

MELODY CRUISE — RKO-Radio. — Playboy 
Charlie Ruggles has girl trouble on a cruise. Good 
music; plot falls apart. (Aug.) 

MIDNIGHT CLUB— Paramount.— George Raft 

plays crook to catch chief crook Clive Brook, but falls 
in love with Helen Vinson, one of the gang. Not as 
good as the grand cast suggests it should be. (Oct.) 



MIDNIGHT MARY— M-G-M.— Loretta Young 
does a better than usual gun moll; she shoots big-shot 
Ricardo Cortez to save lawyer Franchot Tone for the 
plot. (A ug.) 

MIDSHIPMAN JACK— RKO-Radio.— A color- 
ful story of Annapolis and a careless midshipman who 
makes good. Bruce Cabot, Betty Furness, Frank 
Albertson, others. (Dec.) 

• MOONLIGHT AND PRETZELS— Univer- 
sal. — Leo Carrillo, Lillian Miles, Roger Pryor, 
Mary Brian, in a musical. Familiar theme but ex- 
cellent numbers. (Nov.) 

MORGENROT (DAWN).— UFA.— An excellent 
German film about submarine warfare. English pro- 
logue and captions. (^1 ug.) 

• MORNING GLORY, THE— RKO-Radio.— 
Katharine Hepburn at her superb best in a 
story of a country girl determined to make good on 
the stage. Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., Adolphe Menjou, 
Mary Duncan. (Oct.) 

• MY WEAKNESS— Fox.— Lilian Harvey as a 
Cinderella coached by Lew Ayres to catch his 
rich uncle's son, Charles Butterworth. Charles is a 
riot. (Dec.) 

MYRT AND MARGE — Universal.— Two popular 
radio stars do their stuff for the movies; an amusing 
little musical. (Nov.) 

NARROW CORNER, THE— Warners.— Doug 
Fairbanks, Jr., in a lugubrious tale of evil passions in 
the South Seas. Fine acting, fine cast, but a dark 
brown after-taste. (Aug.) 

NIGHT AND DAY— Gaumont- British— Mixed 
music and melodrama, done in leisurely British 
fashion; the mixture doesn't jell. (Aug.) 

• NIGHT FLIGHT— M-G-M.— All star cast, 
with two Barrymores, Helen Hayes, Robert 
Montgomery, Myrna Loy, Clark Gable, others. Not 
much plot, but gripping tension and great acting, as 
night flying starts in the Argentine. ( Nov.) 

NO MARRIAGE TIES— RKO-Radio.— Richard 
Dix as a brilliant sot who makes good in advertising, 
with Elizabeth Allan clinging to him. Good Dix 
stuff. (Sept.) 

• NUISANCE, THE— M-G-M.— (Reviewed un- 
der the title "Never Give A Sucker A Break.") 
Lee Tracy at his best as a shyster lawyer and ambu- 
lance chaser; Frank Morgan adds a magnificent 
drunken doctor accomplice, until Madge Evans trips 
them up. Fast, packed with laughs. (July) 



• ONE MAN'S JOURNEY— RKO-Radio — 
Lionel Barrymore struggles from obscurity to 
universal esteem as a self-sacrificing, conscientious 
country doctor. May Robson, David Landau, Joel 
McCrea, others, in support. ( Nov.) 



ONE SUNDAY AFTERNOON — Paramount.— 

Dentist Gary Cooper suddenly finds his life-long 
enemy in his dental chair, at his mercy, and thinks 
back over it all. Direction could have done better 
with cast and story. ( Nov.) 

ONE YEAR LATER— Allied.— Melodrama that 
turns a slow start into a good finish. Mary Brian 
and Donald Dillaway. (Oct.) 

OVER THE SEVEN SEAS— William K. Vander- 
bilt. — Mr. Vanderbilt'sfilmsof his journey around the 
world, gathering marine specimens. Some wonderful 
color photography. (A ug.) 



• PADDY, THE NEXTBESTTHING— Fox — 
Janet Gaynor in a whimsical, delightful story 
of an Irish madcap girl who doesn't want big sister 
Margaret Lindsay forced to marry rich planter 
Warner Baxter. (Nov.) 

• PEG O' MY HEART— M-G-M.— The old 
musical favorite, pleasingly done by Marion 
Da vies, J. Farrell MacDonald, Onslow Stevens. (July) 

• PENTHOUSE— M-G-M.— Standard melodrama 
about a "high life" murder, but thrillingly done 
bv Warner Baxter, C. Henry Gordon. Myrna Loy. 
Phillips Holmes, Mae Clarke, and others. (Nov.) 



PICTURE BRIDES— Allied.— Scarlet sisters, 
diamond miners, and not much else. (Dec.) 



Photoplay Magazine for January, 1934 



l 7 



• PILGRIMAGE — Fox.— Henrietta Crosman as 
a mother who loses a son in France. She is 
completely embittered until she visits France as a 
Gold Star mother. Poignant, exquisitely done. (July) 



POIL DE CAROTTE (THE RED HEAD)— 

Pathe-Natan. — Redhead Robert Lynen splendid as 
the lonely boy who tries to hang himself. English 
captions. {Sept.) 

POLICE CALL— Showmens Pictures.— Wild ad- 
ventures in Guatemala; a mediocre film. (.Nov.) 

POWER AND THE GLORY, THE— Fox- 
Ralph Morgan relates the life story of his friend the 
railroad president (Spencer Tracy). Colleen Moon 
"comes back" in this. Unusual and good. [Sept.) 

PRIVATE DETECTIVE 62— Warners.— Not-so- 
thrilling thriller with Hill Powell, who was told to 
frame Margaret Lindsay but married her. (July) 

• PRIVATE LIFE OF HENRY VIII, THE— 
London Film-United Artists. — Charles Laugh- 
ton superb and also gorgeously funny as the royal 
Bluebeard; photography is inspired. (Dec.) 

• PROFESSIONAL SWEETHEART — RKO- 
Radio. — Ginger Rogers in a patchily done but 
funny skit about a radio "purity girl" who's hot-cha 
at heart. Fine comic support. (A Kg.) 

• RAFTER ROMANCE — RKO-Radio. — 
Scrambled plot, but good fun. Two down-and- 
out youngsters (Ginger Rogers and Norman Foster) 
sent to live in the attic because they can't pay the rent. 
Unknown to each other, they meet on the outside. 
Then the fun begins. (Oct.) 

RETURN OF CASEY JONES, THE— Mono- 
gram. — A disjointed railroad melodrama. (Sept.) 

• REUNION IN VIENNA — M-G-M. — John 
Barry more, as the exiled Archduke Rudolf, 
seeks to revive an old romance with Diana Wynyard. 
Brilliantly gay and naughty; it should delight every- 
one. (July) 

SAMARANG — Zeidman-United Artists. — A finely 
done travel piece about Malay pearl divers. Stirring 
shark fights, an octopus; superb native types. (July) 

S ATU R DAY'S M ILLI O NS— Universal.— Foot- 
ball hero Robert Young thinks the game a racket, but 
finds it isn't. Bright and fast. (Dec.) 

SAVAGE GOLD— Harold Auten Prod.— A cork- 
ing travel film, showing the Jivaro Indians of the 
upper Amazon. You'll see human heads shrunk to 
the size of oranges, among other gruesome thrills. 
(Oct.) 

SECRET OF THE BLUE ROOM, THE— Uni- 
versal. — Well-sustained melodrama about a sealed 
and deadly room. Gloria Stuart, William Janney, 
Paul Lukas, Onslow Stevens. (Sept.) 

SHANGHAI MADNESS— Fox.— Melodrama in 
China; Spencer Tracy, Eugene Pallette, Fay Wray, 
better than the story. (Nov.) 

SHE HAD TO SAY YES— First National — 
Loretta Young, cloak-and-suit model, must be agree- 
able to out-of-town buyers. Gets all tangled in its 
own plot. (A Kg.) 

SHEPHERD OF SEVEN HILLS, THE— Faith 
Pictures. — A finely done camera visit to the Vatican, 
with scenes showing Pope Pius XL (Nov.) 

SILK EXPRESS, THE— Warners.— Good m«lo- 
drama; crooks try to stop a silk shipment from Japan. 
Neil Hamilton; fine support. (Aug.) 

SILVER CORD, THE— RKO-Radio.— Laura 
Hope Crews as a possessive mother; son Joel McCrea's 
wife Irene Dunne, and Frances Dee, fiancee of son 
Eric Linden, rebel. Sparkling but "talky." (July) 

SING SINNER SING — Majestic Pictures. — 
Torch singer Leila Hyams tries to reform hubby 
Don Dillaway. Paul Lukas, George Stone also in 
cast. So-so. (Ocl.) 

SKYWAY — Monogram. — A humdrum thriller 
about an airplane pilot, played by newcomer Rav 
Walker. (Oct.) 

SLEEPLESS NIGHTS— Remington Pictures.— 
The old farce idea of a man and girl supposed to be 
married, and thrust into bedrooms accordingly; but 
it's better than most British attempts at humor. 
(Oct.) 

SOLDIERS OF THE STORM— Columbia- 
Standard melodrama about a I". S. Border Patrol 
aviator and liquor smugglers; Regis Toomey makes it 
distinctly good entertainment. (A Kg.) 



SOLITAIRE MAN, THE— M-G-M— Crooked 
doings in an airplane. Herbert Marshall, Lionel 
Atwill, and Mary Boland as a screamingly funny 
American tourist. (A 7 ov.) 

SONG OF SONGS, THE— Paramount— A once- 
thrilling classic about artist-model Marlene Dietrich, 
deserted by artist Brian A In me, and married to 
blustering baron Lionel Atwill. Charming; not stir- 
ring. (Sept.) 

SONG OF THE EAGLE— Paramount.— An hon- 
est old beer baron (Jean Hersholt) is killed by gang- 
sters; his son i Richard Arlen) avenges him. Accept- 
able. (July) 

S. O. S. ICEBERG— Universal.— Thrilling and 
chilling adventure adrift on an iceberg; marvelous 
rescue flying. (Dec.) 

SPHINX, THE— Monogram.— Excellent melo- 
drama, with Lionel Atwill as chief chill-giver; Theo- 
dore Newton, Sheila Terrv, Paul Hurst, Luis Alberni. 
(Aug.) 

STAGE MOTHER— M-G-M.— Alice Brady and 
Maureen O'Sullivan in an "ambitious mother and 
suppressed daughter" tale; Alice Brady's great work 
keeps it from being boring. (Dec.) 

• STORM AT DAYBREAK— M-G-M— Kay 
Francis and Nils Asther two unwilling points 
of a triangle, with Serbian mayor Walter Huston 
as the third. A powerful story of war davs in Sara- 
jevo. (Sept.) 

STORY OF TEMPLE DRAKE, THE— Para- 
mount. — Life of an erotic Southern girl (Miriam 
Hopkins), conquered by gangster Jack LaRue. 
Sordid, repellent. (July) 

STRANGE CASE OF TOM MOONEY, THE— 

First Division. — Newsreel material showing Mooney's 
side of this noted case. Effectively done. (Oct.) 

STRANGER'S RETURN, THE— M-G-M— The 
folks secretly detest rich, crotchety farmer Lionel 
Barrymorc — all except city granddaughter Miriam 
Hopkins. Grand "back to the farm" feeling; 
superb acting. (Sept.) 

STRAWBERRY ROAN— Universal.— Ken May- 
nard and Ruth Hall good; but the horses are so fine, 
humans weren't needed. An exceptional Western. 
(Dec.) 

STUDY IN SCARLET, A— World Wide.— Has 
Reginald Owen as Sherlock Holmes, but Conan Doyle 
wouldn't know the story. Fair, (.-i Kg.) 

SUCKER MONEY— Holly wood Pictures.— A mis- 
erably done expose of fake mediums. (July) 

SUNSET PASS— Paramount.— A Western that is 
one — fine cast, fine action, gorgeous scenery. Worth 
anyone's time. (.4 Kg.) 

SUPERNATURAL — Paramount. — Carole Lom- 
bard attempted a spooky "transmigration of souls" 
thriller in this one. (July) 

SWEETHEART OF SIGMA CHI, THE— Mono- 
gram. — Buster Crabbe and Mary Carlisle ornament 
an otherwise so-so tale of college life. (Dec.) 

SYAMA — Carson Prod. — The elephant doings 
here might have made a one-reel short; otherwise, 
there's nothing. ( Nov.) 

TAMING THE JUNGLE— Invincible.— Another 
revelation of lion taming. Some interest, but not hot. 
(A Kg.) 



TARZAN THE FEARLESS— Principal.— Buster 
Crabbe doing Johnny Weissmuller stuff in a disjointed 
Tarzan tale. Indifferent film fare. (Nov.) 



• THIS DAY AND AGE— Paramount.— Cecil 
B. DeMille produces a grim but gripping story 
of boys who clean up on a gangster when the pi dice fail 
A challenging picture that everyone will talk about. 
(Ocl.) 



THIS IS AMERICA— Frederick Ullman, Jr. Prod. 
— Newsreel material, brilliantly selected and as- 
sembled by Gilbert Seldes, tells the story of America 
from 1917 to the present. Well worth seeing. (Oct.) 

• THREE-CORNERED MOON— Paramount. 
— Nicely done comedy about an impractical, 
happy family. Mary Boland the impractical mama; 
Claudette Colbert the daughter, in love with would- 
be author Hardie Albright. But Doctor Dick Arlen 
moves in and upsets things. (Ocl.) 

THUNDER OVER MEXICO— Sol Lesser Prod. 
— Russian genius Sergei Eisenstein's idea of Mexico's 
revolt against Diaz; breath-taking photography and 
scenery. (--Dig.) 

[ PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 111] 



TO STOP A 

COLD 

QUICK 

— Treat it in the First or 
Dry Stage! 

A COLD is nothing to treat lightly. It may 
end in something serious. A cold is an in- 
ternal infection — keep that in mind. It is an 
infection that usually passes thru three stages. 
The first — the Dry stage, the first 24 hours. 
The second — the Watery Secretion stage, from 1 
to 3 days. The third, the Mucous Secretion stage. 

The 4 Effects Necessary 

The thing to take upon catching cold is Grove's 
Laxative Bromo Quinine. It is expressly a cold 
remedy and it does the four things necessary. 

First, it opens the bowels, gently, but effec- 
tively, the first step in expelling a cold. Second, 
it combats the cold germs in the system and re- 
duces the fever. Third, it relieves the headache 
and that grippy feeling. Fourth, it tones the 
system and helps fortify against further attack. 

This is the treatment a cold requires and any- 
thing less is taking chances. 

Grove's Laxative Bromo Quinine is utterly 

harmless and perfectly safe to take. It is, and has 

been for years, the leading cold and grippe tablet 

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Grove's Laxative Bromo 
O'lininc comes in two sizes — 
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Buy the 50csizcas it gives you 
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Always ask for it by the full 
name and look for the letters 
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Resent a substitute as io 
attempt to "do" you. 




A Cold is an 
Internal Infection 

and Requires 
Internal Treatment 




GROVE'S 

BROMO 



LAXATIVE 

QUININE 



i8 



Photoplay Magazine for January, 1934 





GARBO'S TRIUITlPHflnT RETURn 

TO THE SCREEIT 




Greta Garbo in "Queen 
Christina" with John 
Gilbert, Ian Keith, Lewis 
Stone, Elizabeth Young, 
A Rouben Mamoulion 
Production, Associate 
Producer, WalterWanger 








Eugene Robert Richee 



TF Dorothea Wieck took the country by storm in "Maedchen in 
■*- Uniform," she has even more touching appeal in her first American 
film, "Cradle Song." That spiritual quality we all loved seems intensified 
tenfold by her garb as a novice, in this glimpse of her falling in love with 
the foundling left in her convent. She fairly radiates motherly tenderness 




Ernest A. Bachrach 



FRANCES DEE doesn't look very militant here. But that wistful 
appeal is just what melts the hearts of all sons of Mars. That's what 
she'll be called on to do in her next, "Rodney," where she has to straighten 
things out for a man who loves his horse above himself and his career. But 
after all her fine work heretofore we'd say Frances is just the girl to do it 




■ 






Clarence Sinclair Bull 



DAINTY Elizabeth Allan seems all rested now from the injury which 
took her out of one film. In fine shape to give us a treat by her work 
with Robert Montgomery in "The Mystery cf the Dead Police. " That 
elusive freshness so few seem to have, unquestionably is at its best 
here. It should provide welcome relief from the story's thrills and chills 




Bert Longworth 



AC ALL to Duty, might well be the title of this intimate study of Ann 
Dvorak, looking up from her script as she hears the summons to work 
in her recent picture, "College Coach." Do you suppose that "stool and 
chair" perch lends her added inspiration for her work? Anyway, it's all 
part of the dressing-room's charming informality, so plainly in evidence 





HAT IS IT A 



GIRL CAN DO «• -7. •.--•• 

eyes admiringly on 
her face? You'll get a hint by studying 
great portraits — notice how the face dom- 
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plexion must have animation — life. You 
have to get away from that dull, flat effect 
given by so many face powders! 

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try Coty Face Powder! It is by actual use 
that Coty proves its remarkable superiority 
— its superlative smoothness, its infinitesi- 
rruilly fine texture. No powder, at any 



price, is finer, purer, smoother. None pos- 
sesses that lasting, exquisite fragrance 
which Coty gives your face! 

A girl who selects her own true Coty 
tone looks like a glorious masterpiece, 
when other women— using dullish, blurry 
powders — seem like faded mono-tints, 
lifeless and undramatic! 

Men abominate, and cosmeticians warn 
against, that aging^'powdered look". Men 
admire, and cosmeticians endorse, the 
rich depth — the Portrait-Tone — which 
Coty Face Powder brings its clever users. 
When next you buy Face Powder, ask 
for Coty — you can trust its flattery! 




* 




FACE POWDER GIVES PRECIOUS 
^YXhWXX-NFW ANIMATION/ 

Artists know how tricky skin tones are to 
duplicate -yet Coty creates an exact powder 
mulch forflesh- and-blood complexions ! Coty 
Powder texture is amazing— finer, smooth- 
er than fine satin; caressing to the skin. 




HERE we have Marguerite Churchill, who doesn't seem much dis- 
tressed, even though she's a "Girl Without a Room" — and in Paris 
at that — in a film of the same name. But with Charles Farrell and high- 
hatted Walter Woolf helping her to find a domicile, perhaps she won't 
do so badly. Walter's dressy ways come from his Broadway experience 



Close-Ups and Long-Shots 



JESTING to the last, Texas Guinan died as fear- 
lessly as she had lived. Tex was a kindly, indeed a 
lovable, personality. In the days before she be- 
came famous she was a frequent visitor at Photo- 
play's editorial offices — then in Chicago — and I 
learned to know her for the generous, warm-hearted 
creature she was. 

Things were not going so well for her, yet she 
always burst in like a flood of sunshine, driving away 
the shadows of others. 



SOMETIMES she would rehearse for me her stage 
song and dance number, and those were golden 
moments to treasure. 

There was never much of a private performance, as 
you may well guess, for her uplifted voice and the thud 
of her flying feet brought every member of the 
Photoplay staff, down to the lowliest office boy, in a 
circle about her. 

And how her blonde hair would fly and her blue 
eyes flash! 



TEX drifted to New York, where she achieved fame 
as a night club hostess, the first woman, so far as 
I know, to take up this calling. The Texas Guinan 
Club, in New York City, achieved an international 
reputation. Celebrities from all over the world 
gathered there. 

Her cheery greeting to each guest, "Hello, Sucker," 
stamped her individuality like a trade-mark. 

Many actresses, famous on the screen and on 
Broadway, got their start on the floor of Tex's night 
club. Here it was that Ruby Keeler's toes began to 
twinkle, Barbara Stanwyck came to dancing fame, 
Peggy Shannon made her debut. Just three of the 
many that Tex started on their careers. 

She had much of the showmanship qualities of 
Barnum and was generous in the exploitations of 
others as well as of herself. 

Tex flourished in the heyday of night club life. 
Perhaps the type of entertainment she sponsored is 
now on the wane. Tex, however, was always able to 
meet life on its own terms. She had the talent to 
adjust herself to new and changing conditions. 

The last picture she made was "Broadway Thru a 
Keyhole," and it is on Broadway that she will be most 
missed. 



PRINCES visit Hollywood while kings and dukes 
ponder over it at home. A friend of mine, traveling 
from Paris to Calais, found himself alone in the com- 
partment of a coach with an Englishman, who was 
entirely concentrated on the mysteries of a cross-word 
puzzle. 

Finally the Englishman looked up and asked 
abruptly, "You are an American, aren't you?" 

My friend admitting that he was, the Englishman 
said, "Perhaps you can help me. What American 
motion picture colony is a four letter word?" 

My friend thought for a moment and laughed. 
"Why, Reno of course," he answered. 

Evidently those English don't know the difference 
between making pictures and divorcing actors. 

Incidentally, my friend discovered a little later that 
the diligent cross-wordist was a duke. 



DOUG FAIRBANKS' separation from Mary 
Pickford was news that rolled 'round the world. 
Now there is reason to believe that the rift in the lute 
has been mended and that Doug may resume his 
position as Lord of Pickfair. 

Mary, for the moment, has shut herself off from 
contact with the press. If a reconciliation is in the 
air, she is evidently determined to say nothing for 
publication that might present new obstacles to a 
reunion. Over-zealous outsiders really caused the 
separation. 



HOLLYWOOD can laugh at itself as boister- 
ously, and certainly as sincerely, as any cynic. 
You remember "Once in a Lifetime," the picture that 
burlesqued studio methods. 

In "The Blonde Bombshell," Hollywood gives 
itself another Gargantuan laugh. Hollywood's sacred 
ballyhoo is kidded unmercifully and every actor plays 
his role with unmistakable relish. In this picture 
Hollywood says things about itself it might resent 
coming from an outsider. 

Only the mentally undeveloped take themselves too 
seriously. 

The sophisticated believe in a front, not for its own 
value, but for its effect upon the less informed. 

When Hollywood can produce a satirical riot like 
"The Blonde Bombshell," no further argument need 
be advanced that pictures have grown up. 

9.R 



REMEMBER the quarter which George Raft 
nipped so accurately and disconcertingly in 
"Scarface" — the one which brought him his first real 
screen fame? 

Well, it wasn't a quarter. It was a nickel. Further- 
more, George still has it among his keepsakes. 

"But," he says, "don't think I won't spend it if 
things ever get tough." 



IT seems only the other day that no movie actor felt 
safe until he had a studio contract locked up in his 
safe deposit box. But now the dotted line is some- 
thing to be avoided. 

This is the hour of the free lance, and an actor can 
often make more money by simply agreeing to make 
two or three pictures a year for a studio, with the 
privilege of making pictures for any company he 
desires in the interim. 



AL TOGR APH seekers in Hollywood are going en- 
tirely beyond the bounds of decency in their 
quest for signatures of the stars. At two funerals they 
forced themselves to the front at a moment when the 
thoughts of the mourners were turned to the sacred 
services for the dead. 

At the graveside, raucous voices of these intruders 
were heard demanding the coveted autographs. At 
times the situation grew entirely out of hand. 



UNDOUBTEDLY the autograph hunters who 
behaved so disgracefully were persons who make 
a business of gathei ing and selling signatures of 
players. 

The stars generously and good naturedly respond to 
requests for their handwriting, but if demonstrations 
of this sort continue there is likely to be a marked 
decline in their complaisance. 



EDMUND LOWE is scheduled for a dozen pictures 
in several studios and Gary Cooper, Miriam Hop- 
kins and Fredric March do not want their options 
taken up when their contracts expire. They feel they 
could do better on a free lance basis. 

John and Lionel Barrymore have arrangements to 
work between M-G-M and RKO-Radio; Ann.llarding 
and Constance Bennett between 20th Century and 
RKO-Radio. And others enjoy the same status. 



WHEN you pause to figure it out, "Alice in 
Wonderland" has no villain, no hero, no sex 
and no love-interest ! 

And to think — that story lias been getting by for 
years ! 

We dare some intrepid scenario writer to heard a 
producer in his den and try to sell him an original 
story lacking all these so-called vital elements. 

Three guesses — who will land on whose ear in what 
alley? 



LAST month we told you about the tide of Broad- 
way players to Hollywood. While this tide con- 
tinues, there is a counter drift. At the present time 
there are eighty players who have found their way 
back to the New York stage. 

Those returning to Broadway are not, however, 
necessarily deserting the screen. Some of them are 
going into winter stage productions. Others will 
alternate between film and stage. 

There is, of course, a certain percentage who, for 
one reason or another, are through with pictures. 

A dozen of those snared by the shrewd New York 
impresarios practically received their acting training 
in the talkies. It seems to have become a game be- 
tween Broadway and Hollywood. Tit for tat. 

It all makes for better-rounded, more versatile 
actors, so the public is the gainer by this interchange. 

26 



WHAT a difference just a few pages make! 
When Warners bought "Anthony Adverse" 
for filming, the rumor went around the studio that the 
book had eight big, rich parts in it. Every leading 
actor and actress on the lot rushed out to buy a copy 
to see if he or she wasn't just the person to play it. 

Imagine their confusion when the volume was un- 
wrapped at home and found to consist of no less than 
1250 pages! So far none have definitely applied 
for roles. 

Thev haven't been able to read that fast! 



THE talkies introduced the theater's unification, 
both in plot and action. Compare the earlier 
talkies, such as "The Doctor's Secret" and "The Last 
of Mrs. Cheyney," with the silents that preceded the 
sound era. A formula was established which, with 
few variations, has lasted more than five years. 

But now Director Clarence Brown believes a new 
trend has set in. He cites his "Night Flight" as a 
picture, which, lacking a well defined plot, has never- 
theless received an impressive reception throughout 
the country. 

Pure narrative has always been the literature of the 
people. Any interesting story, no matter how it may 
wander, always has arrested and always will arrest 
attention. Earlier novels of the Spanish, French and 
English were nothing more than a series of episodes 
strung together, with one "hero" animating the action. 



AFTER several centuries we seem to be coming 
back to the same point in the fiction cycle. 
Hervey Allen's recent romance, "Anthony Adverse," 
is a striking instance of this tendency. 

Other recent examples on the screen in accord with 
Mr. Brown's idea are "The Power and the Glory" and 
"Alice in Wonderland." 

Kathryn Dougherty 



Photoplay Magazine for January, 1934 



2 7 



13 



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PHANTOM DADDIES 




The wistful little chap above is Kenyon Clar- 
ence Sills, who some day may see his famous 
father in the last role Milton Sills played — 
the ferocious Wolf Larson in "The Sea Wolf" 



KENYON CLARENCE SILLS, bow and 
arrows in hand, played in the beautiful 
gardens which his father, Milton Sills, 
had planted. Kenyon is six years old. 
Like the sons of other movie stars who are 
deceased, his is a strange predicament. If he 
attends a picture show, he faces the possibility 
of suddenly being confronted with a re-issue of 
some old film in which his father played. There, 
daddy would be seen very much alive, portray- 
ing human emotions. And yet a phantom that 
at the end of the play would disappear into no- 
where. The apparition would, of course, give no 
heed to the fact that out in the audience was a 
little chap who used to climb on his knee to 
"ride a horse to Banbury Cross"; to pillow a 
tousled head on his broad shoulder while the 
sandman was coming; or to hear a fairy story. 
No, the figure on the screen would take no 
notice and the little fellow out front would have 
driven deep into his heart the feeling that he was 
seeing his father and not being recognized. Not 
a nod, not a smile, not a sign of recognition, 
whatsoever. And that would hurt. 

It is a situation which has caused hours of 
anxiety and dread to the widows of deceased 
stars in Hollywood. 

"Up to the present time," Doris Kenyon told 
me, "our boy has seen but two pictures — 
Mickey Mouse and one of my own. I fear to 
have him attend the theaters, for there is no 
telling what he may see." 



Securely locked in a storage vault, 
Doris has a print of "The Sea Wolf," 
the last picture Milton Sills was to 
make. The film was given to her by the 
Fox Company shortly after the great 
actor's death in September, 1930. 
Kenyon, the son, was then just three 
years old. 

In "The Sea Wolf," Milton played 
the role of Wolf Larson, the most famous 
fictional character created by Jack 
London — a ruthless, hard-boiled, two- 
fisted sea captain who enforces his power 
with brute strength. He beats down his 
ship's officers, quells uprisings with a 
club, throws his cook to the sharks. He 
is seen in the dives of Singapore and the 
hell-holes East of Suez, drinking rum, 
associating with women of the water- 
front and bullying the beachcombers. 
In the end, his crew mutinies, his eyes 
are seared with a hot poker, and his ship, 
"The Ghost," becomes his funeral pyre. 



of the SCREEN 



Their children fear 
that they will unex- 
pectedly meet them 

By A. L. Wooldridge 



"It's one of the most terrifying pictures he ever 
made," Doris says. "At the same time, it's a magni- 
ficent piece of artistry." 

Will Doris Kenyon ever show this picture to her son? 
Would you, if you were in her place? Will she chance 
leaving an impression on her boy's mind that his daddy 
was that hulking, bullying, snarling "salt" seen driving 
men about in "The Sea Wolf"? 

Kenyon, a manly, courteous little fellow, had drifted 
back from his archery and was listening. 

"Kenyon," I said, "do you remember your father?" 

"Indeed I do," he replied. "I remember him well." 

"And what do you recall most?" I continued. 

Without a moment's hesitation he said: 

"His carrying me in his arms through 
the gardens and telling me about the 
flowers — and the trees, and the things 
that grow." 

"I purpose keeping remem- 
brances of his father about him 
always," Doris said. 

She arose and brought a book 
which, she said, is her son's in- 
dividual property. On the first 





Wally and Elsie Ferguson 
from "Forever." Dorothy 
Davenport Reid has a print, 
and some day, if Wallace 
Jr. wants to, he'll see it 



page is a picture of Sills holding 
Kenyon in his arms, a baby. It 
was the last one taken of the two 
together. Then there was a 
letter written by Prof. Albert 
Einstein, another by George Arliss, 
a third by Sir James Jeans, and so 
on. A carefully preserved letter 
written by Milton who was aboard a 
train the night Kenyon was born, said, in 
part: 



May 6, 1927. 



Wally Reid, Jr. 
has more than a 
hint of his noted 
father in his looks. 
He remembers 
Wally, too — but 
what a heartache 
it gives him to see 
his father's films! 



Fred Thomson 
was one of the 
cleanest men that 
ever graced a 
screen. But his 
son may at some 
time see Fred as 
the notorious! out- 
law Jesse James! 



Kenvon Clarence Sills. 



Dear Sir: As I have not yet had the pleasure 
of meeting you. I address you thus. (There fol- 
lows a beautiful tribute to the mother who 
suffered so to bring him into the world. The 
letter concludes as follows:) 

As for my part, we will be rivals for your 
mother's affections. You will be the well-spring 
of our happiness, whereas I will merely be a tiny 
rivulet from which she will occasionally quaff. 
May all the blessings attend you from this 
moment into a very ripe and mellow old age 
when the undersigned will be but a memory — 
if that. 

Your Father. 

A letter from his mother also is in the treasured 

book. [ PLEASE TURN" TO PACE 102 ] 




"What is a house with- 
out a baby?" said Mrs. 
March. "Well," I said, 
"we have a baby. You 
remember, don't you?" 



Twenty Years After 



IT'S really only five years since my 
advent into the movies, but 1 
wanted to get a lift into the story 
of those years, so I lifted my title 
from Alexander Dumas. 

Yes, it's five years since I signed 
my contract. For me, they've been 
years of quite good health, despite the 
contention of my enemies that they've 
seen me looking pale at option time. 

Now, half a decade is a long time, anyway you look at it, so 
I feel it's high time to review my career on what romanticists 
call "the silver screen," but which is really a square of tightly 
strung glass beads. 

Which only goes to show that things aren't always what 
they appear to be. Like me, for instance. I got into the movies 



"Why, Freddie March 
hasn't been that long 
in pictures!' No, 
no, but read on now 



because I once portrayed John Barry- 
more in a play and people said that I 
looked just like him. 

It used to rankle me (and if you've 
never been rankled, you don't know 
what you're missing) when people 
would say: "I saw you when you 
played the part on the stage. You 
looked just like Barrvmore." Not that 
I wouldn't rather look like him than 
like a lot of other people I could name, but it was much the 
same as coming to Hollywood after winning a newspaper con- 
test and having people point at you and say: "You know who 
that is? That's the Hyena Man." I didn't want to be John 
Barrvmore or the Hyena Man. 

When I signed my contract, I [ please turn to pace 107 ] 



By Fredric March as told to Cromwell MacKechnie 



Qn 



rr Pll Be at Doc Law's 



vr> 



Yi 



Revealing where Will 
Rogers spends his 
evenings, and why 

By Kirtley Baskette 



"EP," declared Doc Law, diverting his gaze from the 
artistic luster he was applying to an ice-cream soda 
glass for a squint at the door, "I wouldn't be a bit sur- 
prised to see Bill happen in any minute now. About 
time he's showing up." 

When Doc Law speaks of "Bill," he means his crony, Will 
Rogers, who lives a ways up the canyon from Doc's drug-store 
and refreshment parlor, just off the Coast Highway at the 
mouth of Santa Monica Canyon, out of Hollywood. 

Each day, past the inconspicuous little beach corner where 
Doc's drug-store, a barbecue counter, souvenir stand and 
sundry other establishments invite ocean bathers, llash the 
shining automobiles of Hollywood's stars, en route to Malibu, 
up the coast. Few, in passing, even notice the sign around the 
corner which reads, "Burton C. Law, Drugs." 

Yet Burton C. Law, erstwhile motion picture character 
actor, now Doc Law, pharmacist, corner drug-store pro- 
prietor and buddy of Will Rogers, was making pictures before 
most of them had ever seen a camera, when Director Frank 
Borzage was getting from two to five dollars a day doing stunts, 
when Robert Leonard and Frank Lloyd were blood-and 
thunder flicker heroes, when Harold Lloyd was an 
ambitious pest of studio lots. 

But all that was almost twenty years 
ago. And Doc Law has been running his 
drug-store now for about eleven years. 
In fact, Doc had sort of forgotten 
about his days as a screen actor, 
until Bill Rogers moved into "the 
neighborhood," up the canyon a 
stretch, some six years ago, and 
started dropping in of evenings 
just to talk over old times, sit a 
spell and discuss politics, may- 
be, watching the people who 
are continually flowing in and 
out of the store, remarking 
about this and observing that, 
while Doc handled the desultory 
evening trade. 

In those six years, it has kind 
of gotten to be a habit for Will, 
when he feels "on the loose," to 
mosey down the canyon to Doc's 
drug-store, where he doesn't have to 
dress or put on any airs, where he can 
sit unnoticed back in the prescription 
room, among the paregoric and pills, the 
laudanum and elixirs, and peek through the cur- 
tains at a plain world he finds every bit as absorbing as 
Hollywood's dizzy sphere of which he is somewhat reluctantly a 
part. 

"I guess it must have been about fifteen years ago that I 
worked with Bill in a picture called 'Honest Hutch,' " remi- 
nisced Doc Law. "I recall I played an Italian character, but 
Bill was the whole show. 

" He always has been just naturally funny — still is. Why, it 
seems like just the way he says things makes them funny. I 
don't think he ever thinks much about what he says before he 
says it, either. Just spontaneous. Don't believe he ever par- 
ticularly planned to be funny in his life. That stuff he writes 




These two cronies have a 
gay time reminiscing. Will 
Rogers and Doc Law, old- 
time character actor, now 
proprietor of a drug-store 
in Santa Monica Canyon 



for the newspapers — he just sits 
down and writes it right off, you 
can bet, as easy as he talks. 
"How does he talk? Why, just 
like he does in his pictures. Maybe 
not so much emphasis on that Okla- 
homa drawl, but pretty near the same. 
"The other night," remembered Doc, 
"Bill came in with Mrs. Rogers. Wasn't 
anyone in the store except myself and Mrs. Law. 
" 'Hello, everybody!' he said. 'Well, we got the kids 
all put away in their stalls, and me and the wife are on the loose. 
Can't tell where we'll end up, might end up anywhere — maybe 
in jail!' 

" It's real amusing sometimes the plain way Bill talks to 
people he meets. I remember not long ago, I was alone here 
one night when an Irish priest came in. While I was fixing him 
up, he mentioned that he understood Will Rogers lived around 
here. Right up the canyon, I told him. 

" Well, at that he got excited. It seems that Bill had been in 
Ireland when they had a bad fire over there somewhere, and he 
had flown right over to the place, [ please turn to page 93 ] 

31 



mazing Story Behind 



First exclusive story, told 
by Laurence Olivier, who 
lost his role to Gilbert 

By Virginia Maxwell 



ONCE in a lifetime, out of the kaleidoscope which is 
Hollywood, there comes an epic real-life drama, a 
quirk of fate so strange that it is almost unbelievable. 
This is what really happened to John Gilbert. 

A chance remark, tossed lightly by an assistant electrician 
and intended to be funny, was the turning point in John 
Gilbert's life. The axle which fate supplied to lift him high 
on the wheel of good fortune once again — to play opposite 
Garbo — from the depths of movie oblivion to which he had 
sunk in the last years. 

For the first time, this inside story is now told. By the 
actor who was brought six thousand miles on contract to 
play opposite Garbo in "Queen Christina," only to lose 
the role to Gilbert. 

Why? And how did it happen? 

It's a fascinating story, one of the few real-life dramas of 
the studio which come from Holly woodjonly too infrequently. 

To understand the great moment which fate threw to 
John Gilbert, we'll have to go back a few months. 

Garbo's new contract, in which she is permitted complete 
okay of who shall play as her lover and who shall not, had 
just been signed on her return from Europe. Garbo looked 
at many "tests." And could not find the type of lover she 
demanded in "Queen Christina." Then they brought in 
films and ran them off for the great Garbo to study. 

"Westward Passage," in which Ann Harding was starred, 
flashed upon the screen of M-G-M's 
private projection room. In it 
played a personable young English 
actor — Laurence Olivier. 

Garbo signalled for the film to 
stop. And in one queenly command, 
Laurence Olivier was decided as 
the man to play her screen lover in 
"Queen Christina." 



METRO consulted their files. He 
wasn't in Hollywood. Olivier 
had returned to London and was 
starring in a British stage play. He 
had always been a stage star and 
pictures had been merely a fling 
for him. 

London Metro offices contacted 
Olivier that very night. And be- 
fore the first light of dawn had 
pierced London's famous fog, Laur- 
ence Olivier was signing his name 
on the dotted line to one of the 
most enviable picture contracts 
ever offered. It meant giving up 
his role on the stage. It meant a 
six thousand mile jaunt, across sea 
and land, to Hollywood. He made 
the trip willingly — eagerly, followed 
by the trumpet and fanfare of a 
world-wide publicity campaign. 
Olivier was Garbo's new screen 
lover, and the world must know. 

32 






¥ ■ 


















j^ 




K M g 


I 


^ ! 






1 ■ 



■ A 

Mb 



There seems to be a magnetic 
harmony between them which 
makes their love scenes real 



What happened from then on is Olivier's 
own story — told exclusively for the first 
time to Photoplay. 

"The day I was introduced to Greta," he 
said, in his boyish, naive way, "I realized 
at once she was going to be difficult to know. 
She's shy as an antelope. And when I tried 
to warm her to my own personality with a 
little conversation, she answered only in 
monosyllables. 

" Garbo is really the mythical person 
people have imagined," he explained quickly. 
"She seems to live entirely within herself, 
unaffected by any of the little things to 
which most mortals are humanized. A rare, 







It was a strange twist of fate that put Gilbert 
in "Queen Christina." And all on the set 
admitted that he casts a magic spell over Garbo 



exotic person, yet so different from any other 
woman in the world, that she is a fascinating 
mixture of shyness and mystery. 

" Garbo was wearing loose lounging pa- 
jamas, a cigarette hung between her slender 
fingers, a script of the picture carried con- 
stantly under one arm. 

" She never rehearses. But for this unusual 
role, the studio executives had persuaded her 
to do some rehearsing before the actual 'takes.' 



"The stage was set for our most important scene — when, as 
Don Antonio, I meet Garbo in her boudoir at the inn and there 
discover the warm, tender woman beneath the boyish mas- 
querade. 

"And this is the part of my story I shall always look back 
upon with a mixture of amazement and disappointment. 

"The director explained that I was to come forward, grasp 
Garbo's slender body tenderly, look into her eyes and, in the 
gesture, awaken the passion within her — that passion for 
which she is later willing to give up the Swedish throne. 

"I went into my role giving it everything I had. But at the 
touch of my hand Garbo became frigid. I could feel the sudden 
tautness of her; her eyes as stony and expressionless as if she ' 
were a woman of marble. 

"Rouben Mamoulian, ace director who knew exactly what 

he wanted, came quietly over and spoke to Garbo. He 

asked her to warm up to me — to try to bring some fire into 

her eyes — some expression of tenderness into the lovely 

curves of her rich, warm mouth. 

"We tried it again. But Garbo was unmoved. She, the 

great actress, whom even-one expected to go into this 

tender scene with convincing abandon, was as frigid to my 

embrace as if she were a woman of stone. 

"Mamoulian came over again. He asked me to talk to 

Garbo — off the set. To try to break down this intangible 

barrier which had risen between us; this cross current of 

magnetism completely out of harmony with each other. 

We walked away a little; smoked together, tried to talk 

small talk. Then we came back and went into the scene 

again. 

" Garbo froze up as before. The director, realizing with his 
keen sense of screen values that Garbo's attitude would register 
cold, was desperate. Suddenly he flung down the script, 
called a halt on everything and turned to his assistants. 

"In heaven's name, is there any man Garbo will warm to?" 
he cried. 

One of the electricians, trying to be funny, shouted that 
Gilbert was the only man Garbo ever went ga-ga over. 

"Get him! Get him here," the 
director shouted. "Get Gilbert 
and let's get some emotion into 
this scene!" 

"They sent for Gilbert then. 
To use his presence merely as a 
stimulant to Garbo's emotional 
depth. 



" T TOOK off my costume and John 
J- Gilbert got into it. As Don 
Antonio, he looked the part. And 
as I stepped aside, ready for Gilbert 
to warm Garbo to the role, an 
amazing thing happened, Garbo's 
face softened; into her eyes came a 
strange, beautiful light. Some- 
thing seemed to be happening deep 
down inside her. A magic spell, 
this emotion which John Gilbert 
stirred within her when he took 
Garbo in his arms and whispered 
those tender phrases. 

"We were watching the real 
thing, an astonishing reaction — 
Garbo's thrilling to the man she 
once had loved. 

"The director was delighted. 
And what was to have been merely 
a rehearsal between Gilbert and 
Garbo became a real shot. Gilbert 
took my place. I relinquished the 

[ PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 101 ] 



Laurence Olivier, who came 6,000 
miles to play the part, then will- 
ingly relinquished it to Gilbert 



33 




SUEEN CHRISTINA pronounces a benedic- 
tion upon her people before she abdicates 
the throne of Sweden. With outstretched arms 
they pleaded with her to reconsider. This is 
(me of the most intensely dramatic moments 
in the great movie story of the magnificent 

3k 



Swedish queen. And Garbo, as Christina, has 
the most impressive dramatic role of her 
career. Gowned in pure white, there is a classic 
beauty in the simplicity of her appearance. On 
her head she wears no crown. Down from her 
throne, she faces her despairing subjects. 



On the extreme right of the picture stands 
the handsome Spanish envoy, Antonio Pimin- 
telli (John Gilbert), whom the queen loves. 

Behind A ntonio, his head bowed with sorrow, 
is the Chancellor Oxenslierna (Lewis Stone), 
always faithful to Christina, and fearful now. 




I'hoto liv Charles Rhodes 



The only happy face in the entire assembly is 
that of the scheming Magnus (Ian Keith). 
Standing at the corner of the stone pillar, wear- 
ing a richly embroidered coat, he might be 
taken for the queen's lover, Antonio, so closely 
do they resemble each other. 



Queen Christina's abdication is a matter of 
history. It took place in the latter part of the 
Seventeenth Century. For the movie pro- 
duction, Director Rouben Mamoulian has in- 
sisted that the throne room be carefully re- 
produced and that every detail of Swedish 



court life be faithfully followed. The picture 
is true to its time. No historian could quibble 
with its authenticity. 

It is a glorious role in a beautiful production 
for Garbo — and one that she has cherished for 
a long, long time. 

2 35 



How Sylvia Changed Ruth 




* 




A photo of Ruth, made three years before she went 
to Hollywood, while playing in "The Little Minister" on 
the New York stage. Her nose was broad and rounded 
at the tip — quite all right on the stage, but bad in films 

36 



ONE morning I went to treat Elsie Janis and found her 
mother, who was alive then, almost in tears. 
" Ruth is sick! " she said before I had time to take off 
my hat. "You must go right to her. 

"It's Ruth Chatterton." And with that she practically 
shoved me out the door. 

Ruth had just come to Hollywood then. I knew she was 
living in Marie Prevost's house. 

I rang the doorbell and a maid opened the door a crack. The 
house was almost dark. Silently she beckoned me up the stairs, 
and pointing to a bedroom door she whispered that I might go 
in. The room was pitch dark. Every shade was drawn. 

"How do you do?" I said to the darkness. There was no 
answer. 

I went over and pulled the curtains open a little way. Then 
I could see someone lying in a big bed, her face entirely covered 
with gauze. 

"Good heavens!" I said. "What's wrong with you? You 
look like an Egyptian mummy." 

Slowly Ruth raised herself up on one elbow and lifted a 
corner of the gauze to peep out at me. "Sunburn," she mur- 
mured. "And there wasn't even any sun. Richard Barthel- 
mess and I were out fishing — five hours on the water. I got 
this. It's dreadful." 

That was my introduction to Ruth Chatterton. 

When she was cured of the sunburn I looked her over for real 
defects. 

Her nerves were shot. She had come to Hollywood from the 
stage. This was just before talkies came in and she had not 
been able to get a job. Fine actress though she was, her nose 
and her figure held her back. 

THEY told her at the studio that her nose photographed badly 
and that discouraged her. Also, she had lumps of fat above 
her hips at the back, large calves and her arms were too thin. 
I shall never forget how relieved she was when I told her I 
could help her — for she knew that her whole future depended 
upon it. 

Now, I have hesitated telling what I did for Ruth Chatter- 
ton's nose, because I'm afraid that if you girls try to do it, you 
won't do it right. But in these articles I have promised to tell 
everything I know and I'm not going to stop at this stage of the 
game. I'm going to let you in on the secret of shaping noses. 
But it is something that has to be carefully done. And if you 
do it yourself — and you can do it yourself — you must promise 
that you will follow directions. Guard the secret well, girls. 
I've never told it to anyone before! 

Ruth had a little fatty bump on the end of her nose and this 
is what I did: If you try it, be as careful as if you were modeling 
something beautiful in marble. Place the forefinger of each 
hand on either side of the bump. Then press very, very gently. 
You must not press hard for that will 
make your nose red and bulbous. Do 
not press for more than half a 
minute at one time. But do it 
over and over each day. Then 
with the thumb and fore- 
finger of the right hand 
work down the nose from 
the top of the bridge 
very gently and lightly 
massage the bump of 
fat you want removed. 
In other words, model 
your nose as if it were 
clay, but model it with 
a very slight pressure. 

Now work on the rest 
of the face, for those 
glands affect the nose. 
With the middle finger 
of either hand gently 
rub from the side of the 
nostrils outwards in a 



Chattertons Nose and Figure 



«' 



' YLVIA has beautified many of 
►Jour most famous stars. Every 
month, in PHOTOPLAY Magazine, 
she tells you how she did it, and 
how you can work the same 
beauty miracles for yourself, at 
home. She will be glad to write 
you personally, too, without 
charge. On page 92 are some of 
her answers, and directions for 
getting advice free from this 
most famous masseuse. 



slightly upward movement. When you're doing this do not rub 
the nostrils but merely around them. 

I do not believe in hot and cold application, alternated. It 
makes the skin flabby. And I know that ice should never be 
used directly upon the face, for that dries and hardens the skin. 
However, cold water is excellent and will put plenty of pep into 
your skin. 

So, in the general nose treatment, include this: Wash the 
face in luke warm water and soap suds. Rinse the suds off with 
warm water. Have two or three small Turkish towels handy. 
Soak one in ice cold water and spread it over the face. As soon 
as the coldness goes out of one towel, use another. Spend about 
fifteen minutes a day on this treatment. You'll find that it will 
take away that bulbous look from the nose. 

It all takes infinite time and patience — shaping the nose — 
but anyone can do it. 

As for Ruth's figure — it was just fat in spots. She did not 
need to reduce all over. In fact, her arms needed building up. 
So I did not put her on a strenuous diet. The way I took off the 
fat from the back of her hips and the calves of the legs was by 
stretching. I made her relax and then I stretched her. You can 
do it for yourselves like this: 

LIE on the floor. Relax. Relax every muscle and feel your 
body becoming heavy, as if it were going to sink right 
through the floor. Then with your muscles still relaxed begin to 
stretch slowly, and feel an enormous pull. Stretch the muscles 
that you want reduced. It's the lazy girl's way of reducing, 
but it shows results. 

It is best to lie on the floor on your back while stretching, 
with your toes caught under some heavy piece of furniture. Or, 
you can make your husband or a girl friend hold your feet down. 
Then, with your feet held, pull and stretch, pull and stretch. 
Do you feel that getting at the fat? You bet you do! 

Now you've got to concentrate on the muscles that need to 
be stretched off. You can feel the muscles pulling in your 
shoulder blades. You can feel the pull in the calves of your 
legs and in the hips. When you feel that, you'll know you're 
on the right track. 

Of course, there will be stubborn places that won't respond. 
These must be pinched and squeezed off. 

But I had to do more than reduce Ruth. I had to try to keep 
her cheered up. She could not understand why she wasn't able 
to obtain a job in pictures. 

"You're a swell actress," I used to tell her. "You've told me 
so yourself." I had seen her on the stage in "The Devil's Plum 
Tree," and I knew she was good. "Don't let Hollywood get 
you down." I saw her the night she got her first chance — in a 
silent picture wdth Emil Jannings. He had seen dozens of 
tests of other actresses. When he saw Ruth's test he said, 
"The girl in the picture is supposed to be naughty. This girl 
looks the part." [ please turn to page 92 ] 




Before Ruth Chatterton got a movi e contract, Sylvia was 
called in to beautify her nose. In this picture, taken 
after she became a star, you will notice how Ruth's 
nose became well-shaped, correctly narrow at the tip 

37 




NO man, they say, is a hero to his valet. And the guy 
who serves the human race while they eat is pretty 
well up on the lowdown, too. 

So Joe Mann, the celebrated Hollywood maitre 
d'kotel, knows the screen stars pretty much as they are. Joe 
has presided at their table for years; for eighteen years, to be 
exact, at Hollywood's famous dine-and-dance resorts. Cur- 

38 



Joe Mann dower left-hand corner) is a celebrated maitre d'hotel who sees the screen stars as 
they are. Above Joe is Richard Dix — the biggest eater Joe knows. Charlie Chaplin and Paulette 
Goddard are way up in the corner — because they always ask Joe for a table away from the 
crowds. And that's Charlie Farrell laughing with Virginia Valli, in the center. The family circle 
on the upper right is Eddie, Julia and the five little Cantors. And the gentleman watching them 
is Bill Powell. Down in the lower center is Von Stroheim's profile, with Lilyan Tashman next to 
him and, right around the circle: Ann Harding, Chevalier, Ruth Chatterton, Frank Woody, 
Helen Twelvetrees, Mary Pickford, and Mary Brian talking to Dick Powell. The quartet occupy- 
ing the front limelight are newlyweds Hal Rosson and Jean Harlow, and Franchot with Joan 



rently Joe is host at the Blossom Room in the Roosevelt Hotel, 
whither, at some time or another, most of the stars wend their 
hungry way. 

Of all the scintillating, captivating personalities of the silver 
sheet, Jean Harlow is Joe's favorite. In a general sort of way 
he might be said to have something of a crush on her, and all 
because she's such a perfect lady with a knife and fork. 

"Miss Harlow generally comes here to dinner with her new 
husband and a party of friends," said Joe. "Never alone. 
And does she appreciate good service! More than anyone I 
know! If anyone in her party fails to leave what she considers 
an adequate tip, she leaves it out of her own purse — and is 
she the autograph seekers' idea of heaven! It's really a won- 
der to me how such a gracious lady can portray the sveltely- 
sinning screen ladies she does. She must be a wonderful 
actress!" 

You will notice that Joe speaks of Jean mostly in exclamation 
points. 

Another of Joe's favorites is Mary Fickford, whom he says 
is not only queen of Hollywood as a whole but of the Blossom 
Room in particular. Her table is a regular court, with the lords 
and ladies of filmdom bending the knee to Mary's courtly, 
regal little bow. But where Jean loves chicken Mary prefers 
fish — broiled salmon steak above anything. And eats scarcely 
enough of that to feed a humming-bird. 

" Charlie Farrell is the friendliest person who ever comes 
here," Joe declares, "while Ann Harding is the ritziest, and 



ernes : 




By Henry M. Fine 

[LIU S T K A I B 1) 1! V F 1< A \ K D O B I A S 



Bess Meredyth, screen writer and wife of Director Michael 
Curtiz, the most lavish hostess. Warner Baxter is by all odds 
the most democratic — half of the time you find him in the 
kitchen shaking hands with the help; Greta Garbo is the most 
dignified, and Mary Brian the sweetest." 

Ann Harding, by the way, goes for the solid foods — steaks 
and fried chicken — which is scarcely indicative of those 



spirituelle roles of hers. But the biggest eater who patronizes 
the Blossom Room is Richard Dix. A filet mignon is just an 
appetizer to him. He eats — and eats — -consuming sirloin after 
sirloin, broiled rare, with copious gobs of corn and baked 
potatoes. When he's finished, he just gets up and goes. 

"See you again, Joe," he says. But Joe knows it's time 
to lay in another side of beef. [ please turn to page 98 ] 

39 




Tex's last movie — her farewell to us 
— was "Broadway Thru A Keyhole" 



By Nina Remen 



And Now Taps Sound for Tex! 



TEX GUINAN'S passing away has shocked Hollywood. 
They mourn her passing as a great character of Broad- 
way. And a dozen top-notch stars of pictures today are 
reminiscing, as into their memories creeps the big 
moment of their early days — that moment when Broadway's 
big sister gave them a first chance and made audiences respond 
with her ballyhoo bark of: "Give the little girl a great big 
hand." 

There's Ruby Keeler, for instance. And Barbara Stanwyck; 
Peggy Shannon, whose red hair dazzled the Guinan night club 
guests; Claire Luce, blonde and pretty who married a million- 
aire and went into pictures after the Follies; Pearl Eaton, 
whom Ziegfeld found at Guinan's club and who graduated 
from the Follies into the studios, later to marry Richard C. 
Enderly with one of the most dazzling weddings Hollywood 
has yet to know; Bee Jackson, the shimmy queen ofTex'sown 
cabaret, who later became nationally famous as a dancer. 

All looking back to those first days when, as starry-eyed 
youngsters, dazzled by their first glimpse of Broadway's inner 
circle, they thought Fate had showered them with gifts be- 
cause the great Guinan had singled them out for a try-out. 

Yes, there are two other well known Hollywood celebrities 



who had their first opportunity under Tex Guinan's guiding 
hand. Sigmund Romberg. You've heard his delightful, en- 
chanting melodies in pictures and on the stage since those 
days — an artist in a class by himself. Remember "Viennese 
Nights" and "The Desert Song"? Only a little while back, a 
piano player in Guinan's first slummy ;joint over on the East 
Side, Romberg was one of many theatrical folk out of work 
who could eat if they'd give a little free entertainment. Last 
year Romberg received $3,000 for a half hour radio broadcast. 

And Eric Von Stroheim — the great director whose pictures 
have been hailed as masterpieces by critics. Von once worked 
as a waiter at Guinan's first club which she called "Gypsy 
Land." 

Von Stroheim wasn't really a waiter, however. He was a 
great artist, struggling for recognition. But even great artists 
get hungry once in a while. And Von found sustenance in 
Guinan's recognition of genius long before any other person 
realized Von Stroheim had something real to offer. 

He waited on tables. And in between the coming of patrons, 
he and Tex Guinan engaged in long, fascinating talks about 
movies and what could be done with this medium of expression 
if only one might get a chance to [ please turn to page 100 ] 



A host of Hollywood stars owe their start to the Night Club Queen 



40 




Elmer Fryer 



TLJIS name is Chief Thunder Horse, of the Sioux tribe. Under the 
bronje make-up, and in spite of the black braids, you may recognize 
Dick Barthelmess. Dick was recently inducted into the Sioux tribe and 
made a tribal leader by the famous chief, Standing Bear. As the Indian 
hero of "Massacre," Barthelmess should give a convincing performance 



a vies 




MARION 
DA VIES has 
for many years been 
queen of Holly 
wood's society. And, 
as befits a queen, she 
lives in a palace and 
here friends are 
royally entertained 




THE marine room is 
one of the more in' 
formal rooms of the house 
— where small parties are 
held and games are 
played. It is entirely 
panelled in genuine Eng' 
lish walnut and furnished 
with fine period pieces. 
Note the massive beauty 
of the big library desk 



THIS is the main din' 
ing room, used for 
formal dinner parties. 
The paintings are all 
original old masters. 
These and the beautiful 
Oriental rug give the 
room a rare richness of 
color. The dazzling array 
of silver is old English 
sterling serving pieces 



House at Santa Monica 




THE lovely lady 
of the house, 
Miss Davies, divides 
her time these days 
between social life at 
home and work at the 
studio. She recently 
finished work on 
"Going Hollywood" 



Photos by- 
Clarence Sinclair Bull 



THE music room, one 
of the smaller rooms, 
is brightly decorated, 
with patterned draperies, 
a lovely white mantel' 
piece, and a marble-top 
table. Ceiling is painted 
with murals. This room, 
like the others pictured 
here, commands a splendid 
view of the ocean front 



THE gold room is the 
most elaborate room 
in the house. The walls 
are decorated in gold-leaf 
against a gold back' 
ground. The draperies 
are gold brocade and the 
chairs are upholstered in 
the same material. It is 
the room used for very 
formal social functions 





Elmer Fryer 



QHE'S known as the hard-luck lady of Hollywood, and the pluckiest 
girl on the screen. Every time things look bright for Mae Clarke, 
there's an ambulance just around the corner. But in spite of illnesses and 
tough breaks, Mae retains her beauty and her courage. Here's hoping 
1934 is full of happiness for her. Her next feature is "Lady Killer" 



Look Out, Jack, for Ma 



r>r> 



t 



If she grabbed the 
Oakie spotlight in 
her first film 
what's coming? 

By Sara Hamilton 



n; 



"OW, Ma, listen." 

'Now, look here, 
Jack Oakie, you listen. 
Why can't I be a movie 
star if I want to? Go on and tell 
me that. Give me three good 
reasons." 

"Well— " 

"Just as I thought. You can't 
think of a thing to say. Not a 
single reason." Mrs. Evelyn Of- 
field (she's adopted the name 
Oakie for her screen name) peered 
in the mirror. 

"When you come right down 
to it," she observed, "Jean Har- 
low's hair is no whiter than mine. 
Is it?" 

"Aw, Ma, you — " 

"Hush. Has Mae West any 
more curves than I've got? Tell 
me that, Jack, go on and tell me." 

"Well—" 

"Keep still. And tell me this. 
Has anyone had more experience 
at playing your Ma than I have? 
Your own mother? Now, answer 
that one." 

"Well—" 

"Stop talking so much. I 
know I'm sixty-five, Jack. I 
know that and I'm proud of it. 
For let me tell you, young man, 
all the best actresses in this busi- 
ness are over fifty. Look at 
Marie Dressier. Look at May 
Robson. Look at Alison Skip- 
worth." 

"Ah, now, Ma, you look at 
them, I — " 

"And there isn't a young whip- 
persnapper in the movies half as 
good. Say something. Don't sit there like a bump on a log." 

"Well—" 

"Good. It's all settled then. You need a mother in this 
new picture 'Too Much Harmony' and, my boy, you've got 
one. Right here at home. And I'm playing the part in the 
picture. Always wanted to be a movie star anyhow, so I 
might as well start now while I'm still young, and get going. 
Now, don't you think I'm right?" 

"No, I—" 

"That's a good boy. I knew you'd agree. Now, when do 
we start?" 

AND so began the career of one Mrs. Evelyn Oakie. 
And once begun it kept growing like a snowball rolling 
down hill. Stealing all her son's thunder and loving it. All 
Hollywood began chuckling and grinning at the comical and 
unique situation of having one's own limelight taken away by 
one's own "ma." Was it fun? 

For instance, into the Paramount commissary at noontime, 




Right to the center table marches Mrs. Oakie, stopping here and there to sign 
autographs. Only way Jack gets any attention these days, is by being nice to "Ma" 



with its quota of writers, reporters and amazed spectators, 
would sweep Ma Oakie. Head high. Blue eyes twinkling. 
Her grand face covered with make-up. Beaming. Right to 
the very center of the dining-room, to the most conspicuous 
table marches "Ma." Bowing, smiling. Deliberately creating 
an entrance. Oh, boy. 

And while every eye was focused on "Ma," in would steal 
Jack. Unobserved and unsung. Usually the center of attrac- 
tion, he now would sit strangely quiet and subdued. Uncertain 
as to just what had happened all of a sudden and why. While 
"Ma" signed dozens of autographs and blew kisses to the 
balcony. 

Was it a riot? Hollywood's famous wisecracker with nothing 
left to say. 

"Now, Ma," Jack observed the first day she reported to the 
studio, "I don't want you to think anything I do around here 
is strange or anything. I mean I'm kinda used to being my- 
self, and if I feel like wading in the fish pond — why, I wade. 
They kinda expect it of me, see? [ please turn to page 98 ] 

45 



Mi A * The Monthly 

York S1TIJ10U71CITI& Broadcast of 



\>f IRIAM HOPKINS and King Vidor were 
dining in the Beverly Hills Brown Derby 
of a Sunday Eve — but not together. With 
backs very pointedly turned. Miriam was in 
a party with Lubitsch, and King with a non- 
professional young lady. 

Apropos of the Vidors, Eleanor Boardman 
Vidor is in Europe, much in the company of 
Harry D'Arrast. There is a strong rumor 
they will be married. 

TWTARY ANN is one of the largest 
elephants in captivity and usually 
takes direction like a veteran. But 
she felt a trifle stubborn the other 
morning during a scene in "Jimmy 
and Sally" — and you know what a 
lot an elephant has to be stubborn 
with. . . . 

Finally up spoke Jimmy Dunn, 
with a bright solution. 

"Why don't they put her on 
casters?" 

N argument between Cary Grant and 
Virginia Cherrill nipped their marriage 
plans in the bud. 




Constance Bennett and Gilbert Roland 
at the preview of their film, "After 
Tonight," the first photo of them taken 
together off screen. Gilbert doesn't 
always attend previews without ''a 
necktie. The Marquis was in Paris 



NOW that it has been settled that the 
costumes Ginger Rogers and twenty- 
four chorus girls will wear in their 
version of Sally Rand's fan dance will weigh 
one and one-half ounces, instead of one-half 
ounce, (each, of course) Paramount has put 
in an order for forty-seven mirrors, four feet 
wide and twelve feet high, to be used to the 
best advantage in the dance. 

•"THE actors wearing masks in "Alice in 
■*■ Wonderland" couldn't hear through them. 
They had no way of telling when the other 
characters had stopped talking, so a wig-wag 
system was invented, using lights. The red 
light started the Duchess; a white light, and 
the Cook went into action. 

V\ THEN Adrienne Ames divorced Stephen 
*^ and married Bruce Cabot at Carlsbad, 
New Mexico, she was scheduled to play in 
Paramount's, "The Trumpet Blows," but has 
been replaced by Frances Drake, the English 
stage importation. Coincidence or? — 

J, 6 



Little Maria Sieber, who played the role of her mother Marlene Dietrich, 
as the child Catherine the Great of Russia. Now the truant officer s 
after her, but she's finished her part, so what has she to worry about? 



Hollywood Goings-Oni 



^\X BAER is a knockout in that knockout 
picture, "The Prizefighter and the Lady." 
He's burning up hearts, too, right and left and 
he's doing a Bill Powell-Carole Lombard, for 
Max took his ex-wife, Dorothy Dunbar, to a 
preview of his picture! 

pATSY RUTH MILLER is back in Holly- 
wood, after shedding a husband and ten 
pounds in Europe. The new heart is Abe 
Lyman, the old maestro. 

TIMMY DUNN doesn't seem to have the 
luck of the Irish. On the way to the marriage 
bureau Lona Andre thought twice. They re- 
turned without it. 

"E^THEL GREER, the circus fat 
"^lady, weighs 637 pounds; her 
husband only 140. 

When Ethel was working in Clara 
Bow's picture, "Hoopla," the hus- 
band visited the set. 

Watching Clara do a hula dance in 
a grass skirt, he said: 

"I never could see why some fel- 
lows go for these skinny girls." 




Thelma Todd found the Three Little Pigs— all stuffed— in a theater lobby, 
and started to take them home. But the big, bad wolf, in the person of the 
theater manager, caught Thelma, and the pigs are back in the lobby 



A small fortune has been spent on these 
youngsters, and yet they remain charm- 
ingly unaffected. They are Sydney and 
Charles Chaplin, Jr. who appear totally 
unconcerned about court battles be- 
tween parents Charlie andLita over them 



Y\ 7ELL, the Marquis evidently meant just 
that when he said, on the eve of his recent 
trip to Paris, it was purely for business reasons. 
He has returned to Hollywood and Constance 
Bennett. Connie worked with Gilbert Roland 
in the picture "After Tonight" in his absence. 

•"THE chorus men in "I Am Suzanne!" began 
by letting Lilian Harvey slip during an 
adagio rehearsal. This decorated her with 
ovely black and blue contusions on both legs 
and hips. Then they pelted her with cotton 
snow-balls. One must have been loaded be- 
cause it hit home and made her nose bleed. 
So they thought it was time to do something 
constructive — whereupon each contributed 
fifty cents and bought her a load of roses. 

T\ TALKING over to the Paramount com- 
v missary past "dressing-room row," one 
encounters a heavy, sweet exotic fragrance. 
On investigation, it proves to be the tuberoses 
in Marlene Dietrich's dressing room — hun- 
dreds of 'em. The favorite Dietrich flower. 




Art Director Hans Dreier shows Charlotte Henry and Director Norman 
McLeod the Duchess' house, designed for "Alice in Wonderland." Charlotte 
won't have trouble getting in that doorway after she nibbles the mushroom 



f~' , RETA GARBO undertook a man-size job 
^-^by breaking in a pair of riding boots she 
wears in "Queen Christina." 

TDAINTING her own house, with 
the assistance of her butler, Lupe 
Velez said: 

"Aw; we just put on the first coat, 
then let the decorators make it look 
like art." 

(CHARLES FARRELL was mentioned to 
^^*play opposite Janet Gaynor in "Carolina." 
Robert Young has been assigned for the role. 
Henry Garat, whom Janet wanted and got for 
"Adorable," is making a picture for Fox in 
Paris with Lili Damita. 

JIMMY DURANTE has patented his name. 
'If anyone wants to name a candy bar after 
him Jimmy wants a cut. Jimmy didn't think 
it necessary to patent his schnozzle. 

A T last Charlie Chaplin, Hollywood's last 
remaining sphinx, has spoken. The oc- 
casion was a national broadcast. Charlie was 



plainly fussed at first and muffed a few words. 
But he finally hit his stride to prove it is not 
the lack of a recording voice that has made 
him stick to pantomime. 

Will this first sweet taste of audibility result 
in a Chaplin talkie? 

AX7ALLACE FORD offers what he 

says is a new simile : "As out of 

luck as a moth in a nudist colony." 

JOHNNY WEISSMULLER has just set some 
sort of a record. Working on the "Tarzan" 
set 'til midnight Saturday, Johnny made a 
flying leap to join his party in a waiting car 
and drove the hundred miles to Palm Springs, 
there to disport himself with his Lupe in the 
pool — until it was time for him to play three 
hours of baseball. 

Following this came an afternoon in the 
desert on horseback, dinner, a Palm Springs 
evening and, at three in the morning, a start 
back to Culver City and the mines. 

Monday morning, promptly at eight, they 
tell us, Johnny was aboard an elephant, all 
made up to beguile his jungle love. 



•""THE attitude of Margaret Sullavan, Uni- 
x versal's new found star, toward Hollywood 
and pictures is becoming classic, although some 
believe just a little overdone. 

In reply to a telegram asking if she cared to 
put her card in local trade papers with the 
premiere of "Only Yesterday," came La 
Sullavan's answer, that she had "just seen the 
picture, and her next advertisement would be 
an obituary." 

This, when everyone was agreed that "Only 
Yesterday" was an excellent picture, and her 
own work outstanding. 

"VDU are going to see a new name in "Trigger," 
a fine character actress, whose name on 
the cast will read "Nan Sunderland." Her 
other name is Mrs. Walter Huston. She will 
play a mountaineer mother in this new Kath- 
arine Hepburn picture. 

r^HICO MARX, they say, called up 
^the Hollywood's Women's Ex- 
change and inquired what they had 
to offer for a slightly faded blonde 
with a small appetite. 

TT sounds like a motion picture comedy gag 
but those who were there say it actually 
happened at Buster Keaton's second wedding 
to Mae Scrivens Hawley. The first, you recall, 
was at Enscnada, Mexico, last January. The 




Wide World 



Remember Baby Peggy — one of 
the popular child stars of silent 
movies? Fifteen now, she uses 
her last name, Montgomery. 
Peggy's in "Eight Girls in a Boat" 



48 



second followed when Natalie's California 
divorce became final. 

Buster and Mae wanted to make certain 
everything was okay. 

Filling out the necessary blanks on the 
application for a license, the clerk asked Buster 
his occupation. 

"Well, some people will argue about it," 
replied Buster, "but I'm a motion picture 
actor." 

The clerk turned inquiringly toward Mr?. 
Hawley. 

"Nurse," she said. 

The clerk took it big. 

"Did you say nerts?" he exclaimed. 

/"* AMERAS prefer blondes, accord- 
ing to Bette Davis' mother — and 
as mother was a photographer, Bette 
took mother's advice and went 
blonde. 

/-"•LARENCE BROWN'S secretary. Marion 
^^Spies, was escorting a visiting group round 
the M-G-M lot. 

"Hey, Charlie," called Miss Spies kiddingly 
to an assistant director. "Can't we go visiting 
on the Garbo set?" 

Charlie's face took on an expression of acute 
distress, and he appeared momentarily tongue- 
tied. 

For there, in a big old limousine, stand- 





When Jack Woody, Jr. came to the studio to see his mother, Helen Twelve- 
trees, he wanted to show everybody on the set that he had learned to walk. 
Work halted while the cast of "King for a Night" stopped to watch him 



Just a couple of pals having a 
quiet smoke. Monko saw Dick 
Arlen with a pipe, and he insisted 
on having one, too. Dick, how- 
ever, didn't demand spectacles! 



ing by the stage door, was Garbo herself. She 
covered her face — and then slid off the seat, 
right onto the floor of the car. 

The party sauntered on, convinced that 
Garbo did not care to be seen! 

TTHE six girls picked by Busby Berkeley, 
famous New York dance director, have 
hung up a new Hollywood record. 

Six days after arriving in Hollywood, here is 
what they had accomplished: 

Blanche McDonald, who had won the title of 
"Miss California" in an Atlantic City beauty 
ccntest, had undergone an appendicitis opera- 
tion, with resulting complications. 

Marie Marks, "Miss Missouri," developed 
appendicitis almost immediately after her 
arrival in Hollywood. 

Marjorie Murphy, still another of the 
"Lucky Six," had tonsillitis and was confined 
to her bed. 

Claire Augerot put in a couple of days work 
and then joined the invalids via the influenza 
route. 

The remaining two kept right on working in 
"Hi, Nellie." 



"\X7HILE Helen Vinson was on her 
way to work one morning her 
car stalled at a busy street intersec- 
tion. 

It didn't flatly refuse to go. It 
merely made futile gasps and gurgles, 
occasionally lurching ahead a few 
feet. 

Traffic piled up behind Helen while 
the signals changed from green to 
red, from red to green, from green to 
red, and so on. 

Finally, a red-headed cop came up 
along side and said in a plaintive sort 
of tone: 

"What's the matter, lady? Haven't 
we got any colors you like?" 

CTILL confined to his bed at his home near 
Newhall, Bill Hart gets a terrific kick out of 

knowing his fans have not forgotten him 

although he has not made a picture since 1925. 
Bill receives about thirty letters a day. 

which is a lot more than some present day 

favorites receive. 

[ PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 118 ] 



/.Q 



Merry Ex-Wives 



THE Society for the Preven- 
tion of Divorce in Hollywood 
was in full swing. The girls, 
all famous in what are known 
as pictures, or — even more lightly — 
movies, were crowded about the 
small 82 x 125 snowwhite living- 
room of Lil Tashman. Decorated, 
of course, by Willie Haines (even to 
the china hop toads). 

All the members were in the room, 
that is, all except Bennett, the Con- 
stance, who, because she was at the 
moment unfriendly with Lil, refused 

to enter. And so stood outside the living-room window adding 
helpful suggestions to the proceedings within. And typically 
enough, the people within thought it neither odd nor unusual. 
Except to feel in a vague way that in some way Warner Bros., 
or even 20th Century, would pay extra for it. With the tax. 



An expose of former 
husbands to warn the 
innocent and brighten 
the happy family circle 

By Sara Hamilton 

ILLUSTRATED BY FRANK DOBIAS 




"Now girls," Lil began, "we're 
here to lay our cards on the genuine 
antique Louis Quatorze table. And 
talk plainly. This divorce business 
has got to stop. And for more 
reasons than one. Mainly, however, 
because all the men have been 
married and remarried until we're 
right back with the same weird indi- 
viduals some of us started with. 
Take the case of Lita Loma. What 
happened to Lita? After four de- 
lightful divorces, Lita married again 
only to discover two days after the 
wedding, her husband was one she'd had before. She recog- 
nized him by the strawberry frappe mark on his shoulder and 
the way he sang 'There'll Be a Hot Time in the Old Town, 
Tonight, My Baby' in his bath. The song dated him. She 
recognized him immediately as a 1905 number with a new 
paint job and slight carburetor adjustments. But you can't 
fool Lita. And so died another beautiful love in Hollywood. 

"As you know, girls, as far as I can remember, I've never been 

divorced, so I'll just sit back and 1st the rest of you get to 

business. It's been proposed that each one step forward, 

tell as briefly as possible all the faults and drawbacks to her 

past or present husband, so when it comes time to change 

husbands all over again, we girls may know ahead of time all 

their little eccentricities and be prepared to cope with them. 

And even understand them. For instance, there 

would be fewer divorces today in Hollywood if 

we but knew why certain husbands insisted 

upon throwing fish to Elsa Maxwell at every 

party or — — " 

"Who iss Elsa Maxwell?" drawled 

Dietrich from her corner, tugging at 

her mannish collar. 

"And so girls, go to it," said Lil. 

"And between speeches I'll model a 

few of my newest mid-winter frocks 

for your jealous disapproval." 

There was a loud sniff from 

Bennett's window. 

"Ladies," spoke up Chatterton, 

" I intend to be brief . I can and 

do honestly say this about 

'Rafe' Forbes. You'll find him 

a delightful dinner companion. A 



"Yoo hoo, Gary, wait for 
us." They rushed out, 
Connie Bennett leading, 
with Lil Tashman, ZaSu 
Pitts and Carole Lom- 
bard right behind. Every 
girl took up the chase 

an 



A 




of Hollywood 




marvelous conversationalist. A splendid gentleman. But he 
will insist that the compelling emotion or lyricism of Brahm's 
third symphony is not in every way comparable with Bee- 
thoven's piano concerto in G major." 

"Oh, that's awful," moaned little Mary Carlisle. "My 
uncle had that once and broke out all over. Why •" 

A nudge from Mrs. Fredric March silenced the wide-eyed 
Mary. 

" Girls," said Mrs. March, taking the floor. 
"I've never lost a husband, but still I think I 
ought to advise you about Freddie — " 

" Go on, go on," the girls urged. 

"Well, I hate to say this, but at the most 
unexpected times he wants to play 'Hyde 
and go Jekyll.' " 

"Goody, goody," clapped little Carlisle. 
"Can he play 'Heavy, heavy, what hangs 



over'? You sec, someone sits 

in a chair and " 

They gently rolled Mary un- 
der the davenport and stuffed 
cushions around the 
edges. Which 
only con- 



Mary they were 
about to play 
"Hyde and go 
Jekvll" and she was 
"it." 
"Now, go on," they 
said to Mrs. March. 
Well, it comes on him at the 
strangest times, as I said. Re 
cently at a formal dinner at our 
home, and right after the crepe suzettes (she 
paused to let this sink in), he fell to twitching." 
"To what?" 
"To twitching. Instantly I knew in another 

moment he'd either be a Hyde or a Jekyll " 

" Or a Barrymore," flipped Bennett from her window. 
Mrs. March sat down in the ermine covered chair 
(also by Willie Haines) in confusion. 

"Junior is okay," began Carole Lombard. 
"She means Bill Powell," someone whispered. 
"But the trouble with Junior is that he wants to be 
P/iilo Vance when I'm worn out after a hard day's 
work. He keeps insisting I'm a clue. I mean after a 
strenuous day's dieting it's too trying to come home 
and find Junior going under the davenport or up and 
down Dick Barthelmess' back with a spy glass. Or 
wanting me to be a clue and hide in the laundry bag 
so he can track me down. I mean I've spent more 
nights in the laundry bag [ please turn to page 104 ] 

51 



KATHARINE HEPBURN'S 



/ 






" So, it became very important to her to achieve, to 'be some- 
body.' And all the intense determination of this youngster 
was bent toward the realization of this ambition — really, I be- 
lieve, as a compensation for her plainness." 

There have been many attempts to explain Hepburn's suc- 
cess. Without beauty, without fame, this girl's name rang 
'round the world in less than six months after she had set foot 
on the sacred territory known as a motion picture lot. With her 
first picture, she forced hard-boiled Hollywood and a skeptical 
public to recognize her as a star. 

AND now, here was a recognized psychologist saying that 
her success was indirectly due to the fact that she had 
been a homely child! 

Mr. Fielding's theory sounded logical, and it certainly was an 
interesting explanation. Neither could it be lightly dismissed, 
for he is an authority on problems of human behavior, and the 
author of several books, including "Love and the Sex Emotions." 

"You believe then," we tracked him down, "that Hepburn, 
as a child, had an inferiority complex which made her ambitious 
to excel and spurred her on to success." 

"Exactly," he answered. 

" Well, what about all these other homely little girls who have 
inferiority complexes because they don't have curls? Very few 
of them turn out to be Hepburns!" 

"True," the psychologist admitted. "We have to concede, 
of course, that Miss Hepburn has talent. But talent very often 
remains buried and undeveloped. I believe that Miss Hep- 
burn's genius might have remained latent and unobserved if the 
tremendous urge to achieve had not spurred her on. 

" However," he continued, "if you asked me to name the most 
potent factor that accounts for her spectacular success, I should 
say it is her great good fortune in the matter of parents." 

"You mean she inherited her ability?" 






Hepburn knows no fear because the bugaboo 
has never been planted in her mind. Yet her 
inferiority complex worked so far toward the 
"superiority" form, she was misunderstood 



I 



"F Katharine Hepburn had been pretty as a 
child, I don't believe she would ever have 
become famous." 

The man who spoke was William J. 
Fielding, eminent psychologist. His opinion 
sounded wild, and it commanded attention. 

"Hepburn was probably the ugly duckling 
among the children in her neighborhood," Mr. 
Fielding explained, "she was not a good-looking 
child. Being sensitive, she was keenly aware of 
this inferiority. 

"She saw prettier children — because of their 
physical charm — receiving the attention of 
adults and the admiration of playmates. 

"Like all children, she too craved the security 
of being admired, of getting praise and com- 
mendation. But she was intelligent enough to 
know she could not compete as a 'pretty child.' 

52 



- ,,-*•-- 




INFERIORITY COMPLEX 



This analysis of the 
eccentric star's emo- 
tional make-up, by an 
eminent psychologist, 
may surprise you 

By Virginia Maxwell 



"Oh no. I don't know about that,"' Mr. Fielding answered 
"I am speaking of the way her parents treated her as a child. 

"From what I understand of her childhood, she was treated 
as a personality, an individual. What is even more important, 
she was never made a victim of the 'you can't do that' bugaboo. 
Her parents treated her positively instead of negatively. They 
said 'yes' oftener than 'no.' They said 'do' instead of 'don't.' 

" Most of us are trained, by parents, to fear things before they 
happen. Well-meaning fathers and mothers build obstacles of 
fear in their children's paths — and often these obstacles are in- 
surmountable." 

Many adults can look back on their own childhood and see 
that Mr. Fielding is right. For most children, there is a con- 
stant parade of "can'ts" and "don'ts," checking them, restrain, 
ing them, making them uncertain and afraid. 

After they are grown up, they say to themselves, "Don't do 
that, you might get hurt," or "Be careful now, that isn't safe," 
or, "You can't do it, you never were good at that sort of thing! " 
Echoes from childhood ! And while these can'ts and don'ts may 




A diffei ,-nt Jo perhaps from the one visualized 
in reading "Little Women," Hepburn gives 
to this roie some of that hidden fire of 
determination William J. Fielding sees in her 



be imaginary — they are, none the less, very 
potent obstacles to success. 

It is true that Katharine Hepburn's parents 
did not repress her. She was a sensitive child, 
and, according to the psychologist, had an in- 
feriority complex. If her parents had thwarted 
her small ambitions as a child, if they had dis- 
couraged her with "can'ts" and made her un- 
certain by saying "don't" she might have grown 
up to be quite an ordinary young lady; one who 
now, in her middl: 



In the hills Hep- 
burn's spirit roves 
free as a bird. Few 
understand this 
quality. They call 
Katharine eccentric 



twenties, might be say 
ing, "Yes, I always 
loved the theater. Oh 
no! I never considered 
going on the stage! I'm 

[ PLEASE TURN TO 
PAGE 100 ] 

53 



ppermanns 



. ■ 




It is all very confusing. 
Those Wuppermann boys are 
always mixed up! But look 
carefully and get it straight 
now once and for all. From 
left to right: Frank, Mrs. 
Ralph, Mrs. Frank and Ralph 



YOU can't disgrace the 
name of Wuppermann!" 
said stately Airs. Wup- 
permann. Regal as Ham- 
let's queen mother, she drew her- 
self up to her full height and 
looked sternly down upon her son. 

At the moment her son was en- 
gaged in trying on a blond wig for 
the melodrama to be presented 
that night by the Dramatic Club 
of the Holy Trinity Church in 
Harlem. 

The boy looked at himself criti- 
cally in the mirror. 

"Being an actor isn't going to 
disgrace a name," he answered, 
carefully adjusting the wig. "Be- 
sides, I'll change mv name." 

"Well, Ralph, you'll still be a 
Wuppermann, and I simply will 
not— — " 

'Excuse me, mother, I'll be 
back in a second." And the boy 
in the wig ran downstairs to get 
the grease paint he had left on 
the kitchen window sill. 

Ralph had a little brother. His 
name was Frankie. They looked 
very much alike except that 
Frankie was still somewhat round- 
cheeked and cherubic looking, 
and didn't try to slick his curls 
down. He was the favorite bov 



This is the younger Wupper- 
mann — before he had thea- 
trical ambitions. Even then 
he resembled his brother 



h 



4 

%5 





1 



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£2m 



A 




y 



By Judith Stone 

This is the older Wupper- 
mann, when he was very 
young. He had no trouble at 
all winning ample attention 



soprano at St. Thomas' church. 
As yet Frankie had no theatrical 
ambitions. He was far more 
interested in chasing fire engines. 
But silently and fervently he 
hoped that Ralph would win the 
heated arguments with hisparents. 

And several years later when 
Ralph tossed up his job as clerk in 
a law office to take a small role 
in a stock company, Frank was as 
pleased as his mother was angry. 

Ralph kept his promise to Mrs. 
Wuppermann. He changed his 
name. He called himself Ralph 
Morgan. 

The young actor's rise on the 
New York stage was steady, and 
his position of prominence in the 
theater was soon established. 

Frank, in the meantime, was 
working for his father who was 
American distributor for an im- 
ported bitters. Frank's job was 
monotonous and his salary was 
seven dollars a week. 

But when he had "time off" he 
could go around to the Lambs 
Club and other famous haunts, 
where he was introduced, grandly, 
as "Ralph Morgan's brother." 

Finally, the routine at Mr. 
Wuppermann's place of business 
became too deadly for Frank. 
He ran away. He went to Las 
Vegas, New Mexico, to punch 
cows. But before he learned to 
throw a lasso, he was roped into 
a poker game — and cleaned out. 

[ PLEASE TURX TO PAGE 105 ] 



hk 




' ' ^^O W you know her and now you don ' t ! " 
-^^ Just to prove that the woman star of 
20th Century's new film, "Moulin Rouge," 
really is Connie Bennett, the lower picture 
shows how she appears in part of the story. 
The larger one shows her highly effective 
"dual role" disguise as a brunette French 
actress, used at several points in the action 



Select Your Pictures and You Won't 




* 



DESIGN FOR LIVING Paramount 



THREE artistic souls in Paris, with somewhat "uncon- 
ventional," shall we say, views of morals, and a triangle 
that reverses the usual order! That is, it's the girl, Miriam 
Hopkins, who just can't keep playwright Fredric March and 
artist Gary Cooper sorted out as lovers! The result promises 
to be highly sophisticated, and it is. 

Starting from the first "gentlemen's agreement" — that 
they'll just be friends all around — it goes through break- 
down after breakdown of this arrangement, with plenty of 
excitement, excellent acting and sparkle, all the way. Finally 
in despair Miriam seeks an answer by marrying Edward 
Everett Horton. But in the fadeout — well, see it! 

It's a daring theme, but artistically and sparklingly han- 
dled throughout, in Ernst Lubitsch's best style. 




* 



HAVANA WIDOWS— First National 



MANY attempts have been made to wring fun from 
Havana high-jinks on the part of playboy (and play- 
girl) Americans, but this one really rings the bell. 

Ex-burlesque chorines Joan Blondell and Glenda Farrell 
decide to take a short road to fun and wealth by trying their 
wiles on supposedly rich playboy Guy Kibbee, while under 
the influence of the Havana spirit. They get away to a good 
start, with Frank McHugh and Allen Jenkins, both in top 
form, figuring largely. But then how things go wrong — as 
wrong as they could in a Cuban election! 

The final twist adds a grand laugh, and proves that the 
tale was concocted by people who know their comedy. 

For an evening of real fun that will banish troubles, you 
can't go wrong on this. 

56 



The 



Shad 



ow 




A Review of the Neiv Pictures 




* 



LITTLE WOMEN~RKO-Radio 



IF this is not the finest picture in years, it is certainly 
among the sweetest, most lovable, and most exquisitely 
done. The Louisa M. Alcott classic story has actually been 
improved by its superbly beautiful screen translation, be- 
cause the rich character and depth possessed by the story 
have been freed from the somewhat saccharine sentimen- 
tality which overlaid them in the book. 

Certainly "Little Women" represents sheer genius in its 
human, intelligent direction by George Cukor, and in its 
artistic capture of the spirit of its period, the 1860's and 
1870's. It is a picture of triumphs — for Katharine Hepburn, 
who as Jo rises to a greatness scarcely rivaled by any other 
actress in Hollywood; for Frances Dee, Joan Bennett and 
Jean Parker, who give splendid performances as Jo's sisters; 
for Paul Lukas, Spring Byington, Douglass Montgomery, 
Edna May Oliver, Henry Stephenson — for every member of 
its perfectly selected cast. The story could not have been 
lived out in real life more realistically than we see it por- 
trayed on the screen. 

The story forces repeated tears, then deftly brushes each 
away with a smile, as a family of girls finds life drawing 
them relentlessly from the girlhood they loved. Whatever 
your taste in pictures, you will feel its charm, you will sense 
the joys and sorrows of the family as keenly as they, because 
this picture is a genuine masterpiece of portraying and 
kindling emotion. 



Have to Complain About the Bad Ones 



The Best Pictures of the Month 

LITTLE WOMEN THE PRIZEFIGHTER AND THE LADY 

DESIGN FOR LIVING HAVANA WIDOWS 

ONLY YESTERDAY THE HOUSE ON 56TH STREET 

DUCK SOUP THE MAD GAME 



The Best Performances of the Month 

Katharine Hepburn in "Little Women'* 

Paul Lukas in "Little Women" 

Max Baer in "The Prizefighter and the Lady" 

Otto Kruger in "The Prizefighter and the Lady" 

Gary Cooper in "Design for Living" 

Fredric March in "Design for Living" 

Margaret Sullavan in "Only Yesterday" 

Kay Francis in "The House on 56th Street" 

Dorothea Wieck in "Cradle Song" 

Chester Morris in "King for a Night" 

Richard Aden in "Hell and High Water" 

Casts of all photoplays reviewed will be found on page 116 




* 



THE PRIZEFIGHTER AND THE LADY—M-G-M 



MAX BAER wins! Not only did he make the best prize- 
fight picture ever shown, but he serves unmistakable 
notice on Hollywood that he's challenging every "male 
menace" known to screendom for the championship with the 
ladies! 

He isn't on the screen ten minutes before you hear the 
whispered comparisons running through the house. He 
backs this up with as smooth an acting job as though he'd 
been in Hollywood for years. And after his rousing fight 
with Camera (in person) there isn't a male sneer anywhere. 

The oft-told story shows him starting as a barroom 
bouncer, being recognized and built up by down-and-out 
"Professor" Walter Huston, former trainer of champions, 
until he cuts out Myrna Loy from gangster Otto Kruger and 
challenges Camera for the world championship. But success 
and the ladies turn his head, and he breaks with Myrna and 
Walter before the big fight. And how that fight wows the 
men folks! 

With Jack Dempsey (also in person) refereeing, Max and 
Primo sock each other through the ropes, down for the count 
of nine, and all the rest — and it's real socking, too. Of 
course, they took care to bring the story out right, but you'd 
never guess it just by watching. 

Finally, the story has real punch, and everyone in it, in- 
cluding Yince Barnett, turns in a gem of acting. So it's an 
entertainment knockout for everybody. 




it 



ONLY YESTERDAY— Universal 



A REAL star blazes forth in the cinema heavens this 
time, and no mistake! After seeing this simple, but in- 
tensely moving play, you'll always have a place on your 
movie-going program whenever Margaret Sullavan is billed! 

It's the simple story of how Margaret loves John Boles, 
not wisely, but too well — with the consequences to be ex- 
pected when he goes to war without knowing what has 
happened. She won't tell — not even years later when their 
love is rekindled, in spite of his marriage — until she is 
dying. Then a letter reveals it, in time to give him new in- 
centive for living after the stock market crash. 

That's the story, but the exquisite work turned in by 
Margaret Sullavan, the superb feeling of John Stahl's direc- 
tion, give it utter, compelling charm. 




■A- 



THE HOUSE ON 56TH STREET— Warners 



AN epic quality and Kay Francis' superb performance 
of a rich role, lift this tale — based on the famous old 
Floradora Sextette — into poignant, compelling drama. 

It's a case of chorus girl Kay being too fascinating for her 
own happiness. After turning down admirer John Halliday, 
she marries Gene Raymond, only to have Halliday kill him- 
self in her house. Result — twenty years in prison for Kay, 
while hubby Gene is killed in the World War. 

Life means little to Kay after she gets out, except for her 
daughter, delightfully played by Margaret Lindsay. So it 
seems easy to drift into association with gambler Ricardo 
Cortez — until the daughter becomes involved, and Kay must 
face another and final tragedy. It's grandly done by all, and 
Kay is superb throughout. 

m 



The National Guide to Motion Pictures 



(RET. U S. PAT. OFF.) 



ft 



DUCK SOUP 
— Paramount 




& 



THE MAD 
GAME— Fox 



AGAIN the Four Marx Brothers crash through with a pack- 
age of hilarious nonsense that is rib-tickling fun for all who 
don't care whether their fun has reason to it. They're all 
mixed up this time in a revolution and other troubles in mythical 
Fredonia — and what a land it must be, judging from what 
happens! But the action is fast, the dialogue is faster, and the 
Marxes fastest of all. It's a riot! 



" CET a crook to catch a crook" — so they release beer baron 
WSpencer Tracy from prison to catch his former lieutenant, 
J. Carroll Naish, who's gone in for kidnapping. Spencer's glad 
to do it, after what J. Carrol did to him, and he gets his man. 
Claire Trevor supplies the love interest exceedingly well, and 
it is a powerful if somber treatment of the theme. Not for 
children. 



CRADLE 
SONG— 
Paramount 




FEMALE— 
First National 



AS in "Maedchen in Uniform," beautiful, sensitive Doro- 
thea Wieck infuses ethereal charm throughout this, her 
first American picture. In it she's a nun who pours out all her 
wealth of mother love upon a foundling left at the convent. Sir 
Guy Standing, Evelyn Venable, and Louise Dresser add finely 
played roles. Some may not care for the unexciting theme, but 
if you appreciate charm in acting, here it is. 



BRIGHT chatter and amusing situations prove that a big 
business girl is just female after all. Ruth Chatterton is head 
of a large motor company and the boys around the office are 
mere game for her until she meets young inventor George Brent. 
He convinces her he is different and even makes her like him as 
boss. An excellent Chatterton portrayal; watch for Ferdinand 
Gottschalk as Pettigrew. 



KING FOR 
A NIGHT— 
Universal 




HOOPLA- 
Fox 



CHESTER MORRIS as Kid Gloves, minister's son, turns 
prize-fighter. You become more and more fond of this 
likable, cocky youngster as the film unreels. Helen Twelve- 
trees, Kid's sister, considers him above all else, and he re- 
ciprocates her affection. This picture should make a big hit 
with fight fans. Chester and Grant Mitchell turn in grand 
performances. 



CLARA BOW should be a natural for the writhing and 
wriggling carnival dancer in the favorite stage play, "The 
Barker," but it doesn't pan out that way. She vamps Richard 
Cromwell, son of barker Preston Foster, per agreement with 
Minna Gombell, discarded sweetie of Preston, and there's con- 
siderable yardage of Clara that her followers might enjoy 
looking at it. But as a tale it won't thrill. 



ZR 



Saves Yo ur Picture Time and Money 



SON OF A 
SAILOR— 
First National 




TAKE A 

CHANCE— 

Paramount 



AS a swaggering sailor with an expansive imagination and a 
glib tongue, Joe E. Brown covers a lot of ground in his 
rollicking way, sampling everything from a gold braid dinner to 
Thelma Todd as a brunette siren — including a "pick up" by the 
admiral's granddaughter, a ride in a pilot-less plane and an 
exclusive borne party. Lots of clean fun and okay for Brown 
admirers. 



JAMES DUNN steps out of romance and shows a real talent 
for comedy in this musical. He and Cliff Edwards are tent- 
show crooks, who want June Knight built up on Broadway, 
through Lilian Bond's influence with producer Buddy Rogers. 
Excellent musical numbers, constant mix-ups thanks to the 
boys' crooked instincts, and good acting, make this a pleasing 
variation on the usual "back stage" tale. 



COLLEGE 
COACH— 
Warners 




CHRIS- 
TOPHER 
BEAN— 
M-G-M 



FOOTBALL is portrayed as unscrupulous, hard-headed busi- 
ness. Coach Pat O'Brien buys up his talent and bribes pass- 
ing grades for his team, to the disgust of student Dick Powell. 
Pat's neglected wife (Ann Dvorak) takes on football hero Lyle 
Talbot, who does a grand job of being a smarty. Coach and 
huskies stop at nothing to win the game, but you'll like O'Brien 
anyway. Fast. 



AS Abby, lifelong maid in the family, Marie Dressier bosses 
Doctor Lionel Barrymore, helps his daughter (Helen 
Mack) elope with Russell Hardie, and quarrels with the doctor's 
wife (Beulah Bondi) and spoiled daughter (Helen Shipman). 
Abby alone realizes the genius of the late Christopher Bean, 
whose paintings, unappreciated and long in the doctor's posses- 
sion, soar in price. Good entertainment. 



WHITE 

WOMAN— 

Paramount 




MY WOMAN 
— Columbia 



HERE'S strong enough horror for anyone! Charles Laugh- 
ton as a sort of jungle Nero, rules an African kingdom, 
where he shelters cast-off Carole Lombard. But when she falls 
in love with Kent Taylor, Charles' evil genius flares forth, and 
ugh! What blood-curdling events do follow! A revolt of the 
jungle tribes ends it; and you'll have seen a masterpiece of 
thrills and chills. Not for children. 



NEVER raise your husband to be a radio star, preaches this 
picture in which Helen Twelvetrees loyally uses the attrac- 
tion she has for radio big-shot Victor Jory, to get her hubby, 
Wally Ford, an ether break. He's a riot, but can't stand suc- 
cess. Drink, a society siren, and the swelled head get him the 
sack and give Victor the victory. 

[ ADDITIONAL REVIEWS ON PAGE 109 ] 




With all the odds against him, W. C. Fields clowned 
himself to success. For he knew that to be a great 
comedian, a man must first learn to laugh at himself 



HIS friend, Henry Clive, the artist, has autographed a 
painting to him "of infinite variety." The life of 
W. C. Fields has been just that. 

His earliest recollection was of thunder and light- 
ning. He was looking out of the window and across the street — 
there were horses in a field running around frightened. He was 
frightened also. This was in a village called Rising Sun, a 
suburb of Philadelphia. 

His father was a commission merchant and had a place near 
the wharf. He seldom made any money, but managed to keep 
busy riding around in his wagon. Every Friday the hay wagons 
came loaded to the market. Bill followed the wagons and col- 
lected stray bits of hay for his father's horse. "Of course, you 
must not steal it," said the father, "but if you can grab a few 
hands full from the wagons it will be all right." 

Bill had the misfortune of being the eldest child in a poverty- 
stricken family. He attended school about four years. 

He worked in a cigar store at nine years of age. His salary 
was one dollar a week. The store carried one brand of cigar, 
which sold for three cents. If a customer asked for a ten or 
twenty cent cigar, he was given the three cent brand, and 
charged the higher price. 

60 



The 

Clown Who 

Juggled 

Apples 



His audiences did 
not know whether 
to laugh or to cry 

By Jim Tully 



Thus, early the future great pantomimist learned 
the sad trickeries of necessity. 

The hours of work were very long for so small a 
boy. Now, in affluent and famous manhood, he re- 
members with bitterness the agony he endured while 
trying to remain awake. One night, in closing the 
shop, he was so sleepy that he took hold of the large 
hot chimney of the kerosene lamp. He carries the 
scar of the burn today. 

As a consequence of what the shopkeeper con- 
sidered carelessness, the boy was discharged. 

THE Fields family moved a great deal during the 
comedian's boyhood. They partook of the religion 
most prevalent in the neighborhood. As there were 
more Quaker churches than those of other denomina- 
tions, Bill said, "We were Quakers more than any- 
thing else." 

Bill's next job was that of cash boy in a large 

clothing store. About ten at the time, there came 

over him, as so often happens to high spirited boys, a 

revulsion to the early treadmill of labor. His mother 

awakened him on the morning of a heavy snow and 

blizzard in December. He must be at work from a 

suburb by eight o'clock. The cars could be made to run with 

difficulty. The snow was above his knees. Insufficiently 

clothed, with five cents carefare from his mother, he walked a 

mile in the heavy snow, and finally caught a car that took him 

to the city. 

Once at work, he proceeded to do even-thing that would get 
him discharged. All was ov^iooked on the blizzardly morning 
until at last, in desperation, h alked through a skylight inside 
the building. Even then th >roprietor did not wish to dis- 
charge him. Would the boy say he was sorry? He would not. 
And thus the store parted with the services of its most gifted 
and irascible cash boy. 

When spring came to Philadelphia, Bill sodded the yard for 
his father. Boylike, he left a rake near the gate, its teeth 
pointing heavenward. The father walked home, stepped 
blithely on the rake. The long hickory handle sprang upward 
even more blithely, and cracked the father of the future Zieg- 
feld sensation squarely on his troubled forehead. 

Few men have poise when cracked in the forehead with a 
rake, especially if a son and heir happens to be laughing nearby. 
The irate father chased his son away. 
"When I returned after many [ please turn to page 108 ] 




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EVENING 



Otto Dyar 

yOU must have a duplicate of this charming lame gown 
which Rita Kaufman has designed for Helen Vinson to 
wear in "As Husbands Go." It is one of those ideal 
holiday party dresses — formal yet not so much so that you 
couldn't wear it to dinner and theater. The ruffled collar 
is of the gold lame lined with blue taffeta. Fullness at hem 



ANOTHER perfect holiday frock is this one, at right, 
worn by Fay Wray in "Master of Men." The satin 
bodice is cut low in front but Kalloch has discreetly covered 
the shoulders with a collar-like effect. The twisted halter 
about the neck is an amusing idea and can be removed if 
you prefer. Two clips and a wide bracelet are accents 

Irving Lippman 







FASHIONS 
















AND ostrich again. The lovely gown, above, of pale 
green chiffon is lavishly trimmed with uncurled ostrich 
feathers of the same shade. Travis Banton designed it for 
Marguerite Churchill to wear in "Girl Without a Room." 
The ostrich is massed below the shoulders on the gown, the 
chiffon cape is trimmed with it, too. A romantic dress 



THE tunic for evening! Here it is at its best as worn by 
Fay Wray in "Master of Men." Fay has included this in 
her personal wardrobe and recently wore it to a premiere 
in Hollywood. The tunic is entirefy beaded with a high 
neckline which is slit to the waist in back. The skirt be- 
neath is of matching satin, rather full with a long train 

Irving Lippman 



Hollywood Puts Brighter Frocks 




J. Van Trees, Sr. 

LEST you think that the fox cape is part of Sally 
Blane's costume above, I must tell you that it is her 
own, worn for the occasion in her new picture "Advice 
to the Lovelorn."' Bright contrasting vestee and sash 
give vivid accent to the dark silk. Amusing tubular 
buttons, don't you think? An unusual skirt detail 



T is Kalloch's waggish idea to put cuffs above the 
elbows on this costume which June Collyer wears in 
"Before Midnight." They look like calla lily petals 
and are lined with the same gold silk that makes the 
collar and bow on the brown tunic. Don't fear that 
the cuffs won't tuck in coat sleeves — they will! 

Shafer 



- 



Under Winter Coats says ^s^r 




Kenneth Alexander 

ABOVE, Loretta Young wears a formal afternoon 
dress in "Born to Be Bad.'" Gwen Wakeling, 
who designed it, must have known how grand it 
would be for you because she has made it in burgundy 
colored dull velvet with naive collar of gold kid. 
The long peplum flares above the ankle length skirt 



HEATHER ANGEL is fast gaining a big fashion fol- 
lowing with the younger set — she knows so well 
how to pick youthful clothes. At right, she wears 
a Royer design from film "7 Lives Were Changed." 
Bright dark blue and red contrast here. The top gives 
a jacket effect though actually it is in one with the skirt 

Otto Dvar 




Hurrell 



IT'S grand to welcome 
charming Lila Lee back 
to the screen again. She 
poses here in a black 
dinner gown from her 
personal wardrobe. It's 
the picture of simplicity 
with an interesting sailor- 
like collar and a big bow 
to save it from too great 
a severity. The favorite 
sheath-like silhouette 
again — very flattering to 
Lila. In silk bengaline 



here sponsored by PHOTOPLAY 
Magazine and worn by famous 
stars in latest motion pictures, 
now may be secured for your 
own wardrobe from leading de- 
partment and ready-to-wear 
stores in many localities. . . . 
Faithful copies of these smartly 
styled and moderately-priced 
garments, of which those shown 
in this issue of PHOTOPLAY 
are typical, are on display this 
month in the stores of those 
representative merchants whose 
firm names are conveniently listed 
for you on Page 115 



s^ 



Otto Dyar 



THIS hostess gown 
which Helen Vinson 
wears in "As Husbands 
Go," is so good looking 
that it has been copied 
for you as a negligee in 
velvet. What a perfect 
Christmas gift! Rhine- 
stone buttons offset a 
double breasted bodice 
effect and rhinestone 
clips trim the belt. Note 
the high collar closing. 
Rita Kaufman designed it 



ANY way you look 
at it, this is a grand 
picture of the hand- 
some Novarro. But 
Hollywood can't hold 
Ramon since he got a 
taste of the concert 
stage. While singing 
in Europe Ramon met 
Jeanette MacDonald 
and, together with 
Irving Thalberg, they 
planned to make "The 
Cat and the Fiddle" 
upon their return to 
the States. Now that 
the movie is finished, 
Ramon isturningagainto 
flesh-and-blood audi- 
ences. He will open 
his second concert tour 
in his home town 
— Durango, Mexico 

Hurrell 





T^RANCIS LEDERER, young Czecho-Slovakian actor, was a star in 
the theaters of Europe and the matinee idol of Broadway before he 
came to Hollywood. His first American movie will be "Man of Two 
Worlds" — story of an Eskimo who leaves Land of the Midnight Sun 
to invade civilization. Here he is with Sarah Padden in scene from film 



Pinch Hitters 

That Came 
Through 



By Ruth Rankin 



BECAUSE a jack-rabbit jumped in Raoul Walsh's 
eye, Warner Baxter got a real break in the movies. 
It was when Walsh was directing and playing the 
lead in " In Old Arizona." The ghastly accident cost 
Raoul the sight of his eye, and threw the Fox studio into 
a panic. They had to get someone to replace Walsh — 
and get him pronto! 

The next day a young actor was on his way out of his 
humble little house, going to sell automobiles. Holly- 
wood wasn't strong for him. He had stuck it out as long as 
he could. Now he had been offered a steady job, and he 
was starting out on his first day's work as a salesman. 

The telephone rang, just as he closed the front door. 

"Let it ring," said Warner. But he paused. The phone 
rang insistently. "Maybe it might be something," the 
thought flashed, "something about pictures." 

So Warner went back and answered the telephone. In 
two minutes he had completely erased from his mind the 
idea of selling cars. Not only did Baxter pinch-hit for 
Walsh in the lead, but he gave 
an interpretation that won him 
the Academy Award for the 
best performance of the year! 

" In Old Arizona" was one of 
the very best of the first talkies, 
and Baxter's resonant voice, 
which had won him success on 
the stage, made him an impor- 
tant contender for success in 
the new medium. Fox wasted 
no time signing him to a long- 
term contract — and Warner 
has been there ever since. 

HOLLYWOOD is a land of 
miracles as well as heart- 
break. And while thousands 
wait, hoping against hope for a 
break in pictures, once in a 
blue moon an actor or actress 
drops out of a part, another 
is hurriedly drafted into serv- 
ice — and a star is made. 

Sometimes it's an unfortu- 
nate accident or illness that 
gives the pinch hitter his 
break. And several times the 
miracle has come about when a 
star staged a walk-out. 

Take Jimmy Cagney's walk- 
out for example. This sassy, 
young Irishman smashed his 
way out of small bits at the 
Warners Studio, and sky-rock- 
eted overnight into a line-up at 
the box-office. But, outside of 
a small boost, his salary remained at the same modest sum. 

So Mrs. Cagney's red-headed Jimmy took a walk-out. He 
landed in New York — and he stayed there. He knew very well 




Ivan Lebedeff's name might have remained 
obscure if he hadn't been asked to pinch hit 
for Asther in "The Blonde Bombshell" 



that his studio had bought the big 
stage hit, " Blessed Event," for him 
— and the part of the fast-speaking 
columnist was a Cagney natural. 
They had to come to terms. 

There followed a long-distance 
controversy that burned up the 
wires. Warners threatened suit — 
and Jimmy threatened to become a 
doctor. Then suddenly, there was 
silence. 

Warners had found another 
"boy." His name was Lee Tracy. 
He could talk sixteen to the dozen, 
he could act — and how. Warners 
had a great bang-up success in 
"Blessed Event." They had cre- 
ated a new star. 

Incidentally, they got the old one 
back as good as new — and the med- 
ical profession lost a doctor with a 
phenomenal bedside manner! Was 
everybody happy? Okay, America! 

Which brings us, with a bound, 
to a lad named Winchell — Walter, to start with. Universal had 
a swell story all polished up, waiting for him. They called it, 
appropriately, "Okay, America!" 

69 



Actors Who Made "Breaks" Good 




Carole Lombard was 
teamed with Clark Gable 
and scored a success in 
"No Man of Her Own," 
because another big star 
had gone temperamental 



Winchell arrived in the midst 
of ninety per cent of his sub- 
ject matter — or Hollywood — 
and immediately developed 
tax-trouble. 

He was making $2,000 a 
week in salary and commis- 
sions on his column. For 
$6,500 every week he did three 
broadcasts. In addition, vari- 
ous and sundry hundreds a 
week were paid him for per- 
sonal appearances. Before 
vaudeville collapsed, he had 
rated $7,500 at the Palace. He 
was going to get $75,000 for 
playing himself in ''Okay 
America!" 

When the frenzied finance 
was straightened out, taxes, 
etc., paid, Walter figured he 
would have just $30,000 left 
out of the seventy-five. So he 
called it quits, and decided to 
be in California for his health 
only. He had arrived originally 
to recuperate from a break- 
down, and the picture was 
going to be a part of the "rest." 

Over at Universal was Lew Ayres, who hit the top in "All 
Quiet on the Western Front" — and Lew had been hitting the 
ceiling for another good part, ever since that memorable per- 
formance. 

So Lew, as unlike W.W. as herring and whipped cream, 



stepped in and played the part. And gave 
it a whale of a performance, which pro- 
pelled him right back up in the starry con- 
stellation. 

Still under the Winchell influence, we 
proceed to "Broadway Thru A Keyhole," 
Winchell's story for the new 20th Century 
Company, over which the Jolson one-sock 
battle took place. 

Peggy Hopkins Joyce was signed to play 
an important part — and walked out in a 
huff after discovering a striking similarity 
between Peggy Hopkins Joyce and the 
character she was supposed to play. Lilvan 
Tashman took up the torch — and went to 
the hospital a few days later with an acute 
appendix. This left the situation in a very 
dismal dither indeed. 

With a burst of inspiration, casting di- 
rector Rufus LeMaire recalled an old test 
he made sometime before of an actress 
named Blossom Seeley, one of the pioneer 
coon-shouters, an immensely popular 
Broadway entertainer. Zanuck looked at 
the test, and the trick was turned. All 
Blossom had to do was make the touch- 
down in the last two minutes of play — and 
Blossom scored. It was her one big chance, 
she realized it, played it to the hilt, and 
now she's right in line for 
a Mae West bombshell- 
success. 



K 



Reluctantly they cast Lee Tracy in "Blessed Event" 
when Jimmy Cagney walked out. And Tracy, the 
substitute, crashed through to stardom with a smash 



walk-outs is that of Nils Asther 
Bombshell." Nils was to do the 
Harlow picture. 

Then suddenly Nils decided 
wouldn't play the part. 



UT here's a double- 
barreled example of 
pinch-hitting, in which 
everybody comes out 
practically even. 

Jack LaRue, then un- 
known to pictures, was 
slated to play an impor- 
tant part in "Scarface." 
He was found to be too 
tall for Paul Muni. So 
another lad, with a face 
also new to pictures, 
played the part. His 
name was George Raft. 

Two years later George 
Raft, now in the spot of 
the privileged to say 
"yes" or "no," said "no" 
to the part of Trigger in 
"The Story of Temple 
Drake." It was a good 
fight while it lasted, and 
Jack LaRue, hitherto 
just a "rod-man" in 
small parts, played the 
role of Trigger. It would 
take some thinking to 
think up a nastier guy 
than Trigger. ButLaRue 
imbued him with a 
murky, sinister unholi- 
ness that you couldn't 
shove out of mind in a 
hurry. It was his Big 
Moment — and he took it 
big. So did the audience. 

Famous among recent 

I-don't -like -t he-part 

s departure from "The Blonde 

role of the Marquis in the Jean 

the role was inadequate. He 

[ PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 103 ] 



70 2 




LILIAN HARVEY and Gene Raymond get charm- 
ingly confidential. And the puppets in the back- 
ground won't interfere — not unless somebody pulls a 
lot of wires! Lilian and Gene are making "I Am 
Suzanne!" in which the puppets are important, too 



71 



Winners of $1,500 



Correct Solutions 

July 

Helen Twelvetrees 

Sylvia Sidney 

Gary Cooper 

Leslie Howard 

August 
Joan Bennett 
Heather Angel 

Cary Grant 
Richard Arlen 

September 

Ruby Keeler 

Mary Carlisle 

Dorothy Jordan 

Marion Davies 



THE Movie Muddles have been un- 
scrambled! The judges, after an 
exceptionally difficult task, have 
selected the eighty-four cash prize 
winners in Photoplay's annual mid-sum- 
mer contest, which was the first Movie 
Muddles contest ever conducted by any 
publication. 

And as you read this, letter carriers in 
various parts of the United States, Canada 
and Mexico will be delivering checks rang- 
ing from $500 to $5 to the fortunate par- 
ticipants in one of the most novel and 
interesting contests ever presented to fol- 
lowers of the screen stars. 

In three issues of Photoplay Magazine, 
the July, August and September numbers, 
appeared the Muddles. The parts of 
these were so arranged by the contestants 
that eight strips, when properly selected 
and properly interwoven, presented the 
picture of one actor or actress, while the 
remaining eight presented the picture of 
another actor or actress. 

It was also possible, by a different in- 
terweaving, to obtain the pictures of two 
other actors, actresses, or of an actor and 
actress, with the sixteen strips. 

Despite this seeming muddle, contest- 
ants wove the strips together presenting 
the correct pictures with such remarkable 
skill and neatness, as well as accuracy, 

that the judges had a muddle of their own in selecting the prize 
winners from the thousands of solutions entered in the contest — 
solutions that poured in from every State in the Union, from 
Canada, Mexico, and even farther away. A glance at the list 
of prize winners will show how widespread the interest was in 
this unusual and fascinating contest. 

A staff experienced in work of this kind made a preliminary 
examination of every solution submitted, preparatory to ar- 
ranging and classifying entries for the later inspection and 
decision of the judges. 

This staff was on the lookout for errors. Any entry that was 

72 




Just a very small number of the entries in Photoplay's Movie Muddle Contest 



incorrectly assembled or had any error in naming either a star 
or a picture in which the star appeared was removed from con- 
sideration. 

Those which passed this preliminary test were then grouped 
for further examination, and it was noticeable that a high 
degree of skill and taste was evident in the way these entries 
met the requirement that each picture be accompanied, not 
only by the name of the star, but by the name of a picture in 
which the star appeared. Some presented the names only of 
the plays; but many used the review of the picture printed in 
Photoplay, and some even added the cast. 






for Movie Muddles 




The Prize Winners 

First Prize, $500.00 

Mil died Butler 

1611 Slattery Bldg. 

Shreveport, La. 

Second Prize, $250.00 

Howard Radatz 

1815 48th Street 

Kenosha, Wis. 

Third Prize, $100.00 

Peggy Castle 

General Delivery 

Tampa, Florida 

Fourth Prize, $50.00 

Myrtle Lubold 

24 W. 69th St.. Apt. 7-B 

New York, N. Y. 

(Additional prize winners on page 96 i 



You can well appreciate the Judges' task in selecting the eighty-four prize winners 



Because one of the rules of the contest specified that, aside 
from accuracy in solving the Muddles and giving the required 
names, neatness and simplicity in the contestants' methods of 
submitting the solutions would count, hours of debate were 
required before the judges could make the final selection of 
prize winners. 

Elaborate presentations, such as were presented in previous 
contests, were conspicuous by their absence. 

The offering of Mildred Butler, of Shreveport, La., showing 
exceptional neatness in the assembling of the muddled pictures, 
was finally selected for the first prize of $500. 



Second prize, of $250, was carried off 
by Howard Radatz, of Kenosha, Wis. 

Peggy Castle, of Tampa, Fla., was 
awarded the third prize of $100. 

Myrtle Lubold, New York City, cap- 
tured the fourth prize of $50. 

Mildred Butler, winner of the first 
prize, in a letter to the contest judges 
after she was advised her solution was 
being considered as one of the prize 
winners, said: 

"I'm so excited over the possibility of 
winning even a small prize in a contest 
that I'm not able to think very well. 
The first thing I would do would be to 
pay some bills. My father has been out 
of work for two years and my mother 
has had a very serious operation that 
resulted in a doctor, nurse and sanitarium 
bill that simply ran out of all pro- 
portions. My salary as a stenographer 
just wouldn't make ends meet on all the 
expenses connected with maintaining a 
home. Well, if I got a prize I'd pay all 
those bills, and breathe freely once more. 
If there was enough left, my mother 
could take a short trip. Then with the 
$5.00 left over, I'd go out and buy a hat 
I saw in the window. I forgot to say, of 
course, I'd give ten per cent of it to 
charity." 

"It is indeed gratifying to me that my 
efforts in this contest have been appreciated to such an extent 
that I can share in the prize money," wrote Howard Radatz, 
winner of the second prize. "It surprised and thrilled me 
beyond description to hear such welcome news. Being a factory 
worker at present unemployed, it can readily be seen how 
advantageous a money prize will be after the struggles of the 
last three years. It is, indeed, a godsend, for which I am 
grateful to Photoplay. There are bills to pay, clothes to buy 
and the satisfaction and joy of having money that I may do 
my part in the 'Buy Now' campaign going on all over the 
country. In closing, I might add [ please turn to page 96 ] 

73 




EVEN Hollywood, blase town that it is, 
gasped at the outpouring of screen dig- 
nitaries that turned up for the opening 
of "The Bowery," the first picture to be re- 
leased by the new 20th Century Pictures com- 
pany, fathered by Joseph M. Schenck and 

74 



Darryl Zanuck. This exclusive photograph 
shows a part of the illustrious crowd that 
filed into the United Artists Theater in Los 
Angeles for the occasion. Appropriately 
enough (counting from the policeman at the 
left), the parade is headed by Mrs. Zanuck 



(Virginia Fox) and Mr. Zanuck. Then comes 
Joseph M. Schenck, and to his left, Marjorie 
King, escorted by one of the stars in the 
picture, George Raft, who plays Steve Brodie. 
Last on the left-hand page is Fay Wray, also 
in the film, and on the edge of the right-hand 







Photo by Charles Rhodes 



picture is her husband, John Monk Saunders. 
Over his shoulder you see Jeanette Mac- 
Donald, then Mary Pickford and the picture's 
soubrette, Pert Kelton (Pert has her hand up- 
raised). Right behind Pert we see Mrs. 
Charles Bigelow, mother of Jackie Cooper, 



who comes next, with Louis B. Mayer. Jackie 
is an important player in the film. Over Mr. 
Mayer's shoulder, we see the famed writer, 
Rupert Hughes; and next to him is Paulette 
Goddard, escorted by Charles Chaplin. The 
next in line is Eddie Cantor, squiring an old 



Broadway friend, Blossom Seeley; and behind 
Blossom, we see Sally O'Xeil, back in Holly- 
wood after a considerable absence from pic- 
tures. The last two in this parade of film 
notables are Russ Columbo and Sally Blane. 
And what a crowd in front! 

75 




News 



rom 



London 



By Kathlyn Hay den 

Photoplay's London Correspondent 



[AN you believe 
it! The English 
ipremiereof "The 
Private Life of 
Henry VIII" — and the 
picture was made in 
England — was weeks 
later than the first public 
showing in the United 
States. But maybe it 
took us English that long 
to gather the assemblage 
of notable first nighters 
that were present. 

The list of names of 
stately duchesses, beau- 
tiful actresses, states- 
men, playwrights and 
other celebrities who 
rubbed shoulders in the 
foyer would fill a whole 
page in Photoplay. 

And, miracle of mir- 
acles, there were actually 
searchlights in Leicester 
Square — an unheard of 

thing in staid old London! Newspaper photographers were 
there en masse and a motion picture camera was set up. Many 
ambitious mothers with their enterprising debutante daughters 
paused and posed before the lenses, not knowing there was no 
film in the camera. 

The young men responsible for this thought it a priceless 
joke. It never occurred to them that they could have coined 
money with their motion picture film of these great ones of 
England. 

CONCERNING Doug Fairbanks, Sr., there is a story being 
whispered in select Mayfair circles. It seems that Doug, 
according to the rumor, let the manager of the London sales- 

76 




Doug air-planed 300 miles every night- 



— To see pretty actress Gertrude Lawrence 



rooms of one of the highest priced cars in the world know that 
he might be a prospective purchaser. Immediately, in accord- 
ance with long established custom, the manager offered the star 
the use of a brand-new car, complete with a liveried chauffeur, 
for a twenty-four hour try-out. 

In this car Doug drove Prince George, the younger brother 
of the Prince of Wales, down to the studios at Elstree and 
showed him over the lot on which he and Alexander Korda 
preside. 

Doug wasn't quite sure whether or not he liked the car, so the 
next day he took a little party of notables to the races with the 
self-same driver at the wheel. When later the manager of the 
motor salesrooms phoned one of Doug's secretaries, he was told 




H. B. Warner re-makes "Sorrell and Son" in England 



that the star decided the car wasn't 
quite what he wanted. 
A touch of Scotch thrift? 

AS for young Doug, he traveled 
three hundred miles every 
night — the round trip from Elstree 
to Manchester, where Gertrude 
Lawrence appeared in "Nymph 
Errant" (a musical show being 
tried out) , now running in London. 
To make the journey, young 
Doug chartered a private airplane, 
which permitted him to remain on 
the set of the picture he is making, 
" Catherine the Great," as late as 
seven o'clock in the evening and 
still be in his front row seat in time 
for the rise of the first act curtain 
of "Nymph Errant" in Man- 
chester. 

He and Gertrude are seen at some 
one of the smart London night 
clubs every night in the week. 
Both deny any truth in the per- 
sistent rumor that an engagement 
is in the offing. 

WITH Charles Laughton, at 
the premiere of "Henry 
VIII," were his five "wives" — and 
they were as lovely in the flesh as 
they are on the screen. Laughton 
told me that Korda had succeeded 
in persuading all of these English 
women to be adamant in their re- 
fusal to accept tempting offers 
that have already come their way 
from Hollywood. 

The girls are Binnie Barnes, 
Elsa Lanchester (Mrs. Charles 
Laughton), Merle Oberon, Everly 
Gregg and Wendy Barrie — as 




She adores London and wants to stay permanently 



lovely a quintette as you'd want 
to see. 

According to Laughton, the act- 
ing of these women has created 
something of a sensation in Holly- 
wood where "Henry VIII" has 
been on view. 

They have all promised Korda 
to keep on saying "No," however 
alluring the Hollywood offers may 
be. 

SPEAKING of girls who say 
"No" (sounds like a good title 
for a picture, what?) I had tea the 
other day at the Ritz with Dor- 
othy Hyson. 

You don't know her? You 
never heard of her? 

Dear, dear! 

Well, she only happened to have 
her name above Karloff's on bill- 
boards and in electric lights when 
the British-made film, "The 
Ghoul," was released here. 

And if you can top Karloff in 
England you're sonic star. 

DOROTHY is the daughter of 
thatotherperenniallyyouthful 
Dorothy — Dickson. And although 
she has lived almost all of her life 
on this side of the water she has 
an American accent you could cut 
with a knife. 

The interesting thing about her 
is the fact that she is probably the 
only human being in the world 
who ever had five separate offers 
from five different Hollywood 
studios — and turned them all 
down flat. 

[ PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 110 ] 

2 77 




Made exclusively for Photoplay by Renato Toppi 



"DUSTER KEATON didn't intend to be a comedian. His 
-*-* first role was a serious one. But when Buster was serious, 
he looked so funny — he got laughs in spite of himself! The 
dead-pan artist has joined the foreign invasion now and is 
planning to leave for England to make a movie over there 



75 



Helen Twelvetrees 
has lived four kinds 
of lives. Now hap- 
pily married to Jack 
Woody she is gradu- 
ally forgetting the 
bitter sorrows of the 
past and learning to 
laugh all over again 







I HAVE always been inclined to smile at that line about an 
actress having to "live" before she can really act. 
Probably you have, too. Don't you sometimes wonder 
just where the necessary "living" leaves off, and dramatic 
license begins? Hasn't it often seemed like glorified, gilded 
excuses for "living"? 

I had a firm grip on that conviction right up until eleven 
o'clock this morning, when Helen Twelvetrees proved that, like 
many other treasured theories, that one won't hold water when 
you meet it face to face. 

In her brief span of twenty-five years, Helen Twelvetrees 
has lived — both with and without quotes. This ethereal-look- 
ing little girl has lived four separate and distinct lives, and each 
as different as if it had been spent on a separate continent. 

And she had no more to say about it, no more control over it, 
than you would have had. 

Girls— even exquisite, poignantly beautiful little cream-and- 
gold girls — don't just go shopping for 
Destiny. D r> ± 1 

Helen explains it this way. " You can't D J ^ U l 



say 'I'll take one of these experiences, a couple of those over 
there trimmed in blue, and you might send along that stunning 
black one on approval.' 

"Before you are twenty you choose, blindly, what your im- 
pulses and emotions tell you to choose. Then you desperately 
try to re-shape, re-organize what you have drawn, into what 
you want it to be. It's a form of self-hypnosis, peculiar to 
women. They go on fixing over — building the merest suggestion 
of a good point here into a lasting virtue. Weeding out a bad 
one there, adroitly as they know how. It works — that is, it 
works if they have good material to start with." Helen's 
stricken blue eyes were remote, far away from her spacious, 
serene living-room, with the cool white flowers. 

Perhaps she was looking back at nineteen-year-old Helen 
Jurgens, just out of school, who married a young actor named 
Clark Twelvetrees, who was also nineteen. That was her 
second life — and what a life! 

The girl who had lived her sheltered 
A? ci n lc i n an( l P rotecte d girlhood in the comfortable 

IV unit I II Brooklyn Heights home, shielded by the 



79 



tender, loving care of a devoted father and mother, stepped 
blindly into a sea of turbulent emotions she never imagined 
possible — until it happened to her. A child who had never 
known bitterness, poverty, or the strange ways of man — a 
trusting, wide-eyed youngster and a perfect "natural" for cruel 
disillusionment. 

Life moved in on the new Mrs. Twelvetrees with a ven- 
geance. She soon discovered that her young husband, who 
could be so frantically in love with her, could be equally jealous, 
negligent, and — shall we say — temperamental? 

The two years that followed were as tragic an introduction 
to life as any young girl has ever had. Helen would just as 
soon have this part skipped over. In her new happiness she has 
forgotten it — so far as one can forget. But this second life is an 
integral and important part of her amazingly complete and 
separate four lives. It has been erased from her conscious 
memory. What she cannot erase is the look of one who has 
seen sorrow and tragedy that lingers in her sapphire-blue eyes. 

After Helen's outstanding performance in "An American 
Tragedy" and other plays on Broadway, she signed a contract 
with Fox. Helen set out for Hollywood with high hopes — and 
a difficult young husband. 

Their days of housekeeping in a furnished room were over. 
But plenty of new problems cropped up. 

CLARK Twelvetrees had no contract. And he was too young 
to get the best perspective on things. He adored his wife. 
She adored him. But his high emotionalism wore away the 
solid rock of Helen's love for him. 

"You can break a lovely vase," Helen said, thoughtfully, 
"and put it back together with painstaking care — gluing each 
separate fragment — until, at a distance, the mended places 
won't show. But it is never the same again. No matter how 
delicately you handle it, some day you will forget — and then 
the insecure, temporary makeshift will shatter in your hands." 

Helen Twelvetrees patched up her marriage until none of the 
original structure remained. The gentle girl who couldn't bear 
to hurt any living thing, allowed it to die a lingering, ghastly 
death for fully a year after a stronger-minded woman would 



have severed the tie abruptly, and started over without a back- 
ward look. 

Helen's next life was the play-girl. Oh yes, she was ripe for 
that. Where the laughter was loudest, the hour latest, there 
was Helen — disillusioned, bewildered, hysterically trying to be 
the life of the party. 

Her marriage left her a heritage of debts like an ominous 
cloud hovering over her head. And then — the climax. Her 
year's contract was up, and Fox made no offer to renew it. 

A BAFFLED, frail wisp of a youngster, about twenty-one, 
alone, broke, faced with debts that would stagger any 
man — not a remote hope to cling to. 

What does a girl do in a spot like that? 

She either goes back home, defeated, and is never heard of 
again, or she props up her chin and sees it through. 

Helen bought a ticket home. Then — she decided to stick it 
out in Hollywood. 

Soon she was rewarded with two good parts. The one in 
"The Grand Parade" led to "Her Man." Then "Millie." 

And Hollywood discovered it had been harboring, all un- 
aware, an at tress. 

I think Helen's life actually begins here. All that went before 
was preparation for the very real, full, happy existence that is 
now hers. 

Her five years in Hollywood have been filled with amazing 
development and experience. Fate exhausted all her whims on 
Helen — then capriciously turned and showered her with an 
abundance of the things she had so long been denied. A bril- 
liant career, a splendid dependable husband (Jack Woody), a 
beautiful baby, a lovely home set in the midst of spacious 
flowering gardens. 

Is it any wonder that the new Helen Twelvetrees is a radi- 
antly beautiful young woman, with the haunted look almost 
gone from her eyes — all gone, when she talks about her baby. 

In the spring of 1933, after she finished her first picture at 
Paramount, "A Bedtime Story," with Chevalier and Baby 
LeRoy, Helen said, " I felt right at home, working with a baby, 
and a man whom my husband [ please turn to page 91 ] 




There isn't even the gleam of a sock in his eye. For James Cagney has gone to the other extreme. He has donned a 
velour jacket and satin knee breeches, and he wins his ladies now by chucking them fondly under the chin! The 
recipient of this very gentle caress is Margaret Lindsay. She and Jimmy are playing together in "Lady Killer" 



80 



PHOTOPLAY'S 



Hollywood Beauty Sh 



All the beauty tricks of all the 
stars brought to you each month 

Conducted 
By Carolyn 
Van W y c k 




GLORIA STUART, 
costumed for the 
leading feminine role in 
ieloved," is appro- 
priately pictured with a 
favorite perfume that is 
the essence of Parisian 
loveliness. The top of 
the box lifts, the front 
falls forward to revea 
a flask of classic design 



A PERFUME gift to thrill any 
/Vfeminine heart is this ultra- 
modern inspiration, used by 
Carole Lombard. \t is an allur- 
ing, zestful scent, embodying the 
spirit of today. In insert, Carole's 

ovely hands hold the perfume in 
its outer covering, a chic box 
bound with metal and seal, after 
the manner of the French air mail.' 
Observe Carole's lacquered nails 

81 



CHRISTMAS NOTE 




IT'S adorable," says Lona Andre in "Take a 
iChance," of this cunning atomizer, designed 
for the traveler. The ingenious crystal bottle 
is enclosed in a smart green, red, blue or black 
leather case. It is evaporation and spill proof 



AKNICKKNACK that many girls will we 
come is this protective head covering o 
perforated cellophane, worn by Judith Allen. 
It keeps curls and make-up intact when dressing 
and protects your garments from lipstick 



82 




pOLLEEN MGORE had an orgy 
v — of Christmas shopping recently. 
Among her purchases is this pow- 
der set, for day and night, for every 
skin, in peachbloom and rachel 
tones. Boxed in lustrous silver, 
attractively beribboned in holiday 
mood. A gift to please everyone 




: ROM HOLLYWOOD 




AS enchanting as the luxurious 
bath powder which it holds, 
is this silver crystal glass container. 
Colleen Moore likes the delicate 
flesh tone of the powder and the 
soft lamb's wool puff. When the 
powder is gone, you will find 
many uses forthe lovely, unusual box 




'#•.<■ 



fw« 



SHIRLEY GREY, whom you will soon see in 
"Hold the Press," is using a foreign essence, 
a cross between a perfume and toilet water, 
that has sophisticates simply raving about it. 
Pungent, very de luxe, it is a gift divine 



ALMOST too beautiful," comments Colleen 
Moore of this gorgeously packaged per- 
fume, just off the boat from Paris. The fluted 
aeon, against a mirror etched with clock hands 
pointing to twelve, contains a heavenly odeur 



83 



■^tel 



4 



4ft» 



Last Minute 

Ideas For 
Beauty Gifts 



■ 



! 



A REMEMBRANCE 
/ \superb is this clear cut 
atomizer in crystal, smoke 
or amethyst, which de- 
lishts Lona Andre. Lona 
repeats the importance of 
perfuming yourself instead 
of your clothing. Inside 
neckline, neck, ears, hair, 
hands are strategic points 



*W*L 






* 



* f 



pOLLEEN MOORE 

> — likes the delicate, 
subtle whiff of 
sophistication classically 
bottled in crystal column 
with marbleized top. A 
perfume reflecting the 
glamour of life and love- 
liness. In perfect taste; 
suited to all occasions 



84 



THERE is a thrill, 
I an electric spark, 
in Helen Hayes' 
perfume choice, at- 
tuned to the mys- 
tery, beauty and 
soft magic of night. 
Both bottle and 
box d r z imag- 
inative creations 



DETTY FURNESS 

•-^prefers a touch 
of fragrance to her 
ears. Her favorite 
is an English gar- 
den bouquet, gay, 
bri 1 1 iant, as ex- 
hilarating asa 
flowerbed in June. 
New dropper bottle 

( For More Beauty Tips Turn to Page 94 ) 




CAMELS ARE MADE FROM FINER, MORE EXPENSIVE 
TOBACCOS THAN ANY OTHER POPULAR BRAND 



"Quality is just as important in 
cigarettes as in anything else. I prefer 
Camels because they are mild with- 
out being flat," says Mrs. Coolidge 
sincerely. "And I enjoy their full 
rich flavor — I never tire of their taste 
nor do they get on my nerves. Of 
course, I keep other brands in the 
house, too, in case some guest might 
want them, but I notice that Camels 



seem to be the general favorite." 
Camels keep right on tasting so 
good because of their costlier tobac- 
cos. They never make your nerves 
"jumpy," always give you a smoke 
that never tires. 

Leaf tobaccos for cigarettes can 
be bought from 50 a pound to §1.00 
— but Camel pays the millions more 
that insure your enjoyment. 



■ Mrs. J. Gardner Coolidge, 2nd 
divides her time charmingly be- 
tween her serenely spacious house 
in Brookline, Massachusetts and the 
Coolidge Island in Squam Lake. Her 
energy and enthusiasm are inex- 
haustible and besides closely super- 
vising the education of her four 
children she gardens a great deal, 
plays badminton and tennis, swims 
and climbs mountains. She loves 
dogs and raises dachshunds with 
great success. She gives charming 
dinners and her panned oysters in a 
tomato sauce are celebrated. She 
always smokes Camel cigarettes. 



Copyright. 1933, R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company 




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Ph-1-34 




THE culinary 
department may 
not hold any special 
charm for you most of 
the year. But during the 
holidays, almost every girl or 
woman has the urge to sur- 
prise the family with little 
delicacies of her own making. 
"Cookies," says Judith 
Allen, "have always been the 
most irresistible things turned 
out in a kitchen. You can 
vary them so much, cut fancy 
shapes, and really enjoy mak- 
ing them." 

One prime favorite, this 
time of year, is the old-fash- 
ioned New Year's Cake, with 
caraway seeds. Here is 
Judith's recipe: 

Beat 2 eggs until light, add 
1 cup sugar gradually. Then 
add 132 tablespoons caraway 
seeds, 1 cup thick cream and 
3 cups flour mixed and sifted 
with 3 teaspoons baking pow- 
der and 1 teaspoon salt. Place 
in refrigerator overnight to 
chill. Now pat out on floured 
board, and roll quarter of an 
inch thick. Cut into desired 
shapes with cutters. Bake on 
buttered sheet or tin in mod- 
erate oven until delicate 
brown. 

Another tempter: 
Butter Cookies — Cream one 
pound butter until smooth, 
add 1 cup sugar. Beat 2 egg 
yolks and add. Then rind of 
half a lemon, grated. Sift 6 
cups flour, 1 teaspoon baking 
powder and 1 teaspoon salt. 



Cookies 




When the spicy, enchanting aromas drift out, Judith 
Allen, like most of us girls, is lured kitchenward. 
Here she is mixing batter for Date and Nut Sticks 



Now add juice of half 
a lemon. Mix to smooth 

dough, and chill several 
hours. Roll out on floured 
board, brush over top with 
unbeaten white of egg, cut in 
shapes desired. Sprinkle 
sugar over cookies and add 
nuts, cocoanut, maraschino 
cherry or any decoration you 
like. 

Bake fifteen minutes in 
moderate oven. Shown with 
cocoanut, upper right hand 
corner of illustration. 

Spice Cookies — Cream % 
cup butter and P-j cups 
sugar, add 2 beaten eggs. 
Then 1 cup seeded raisins, 1 
teaspoon each cinnamon, 
cloves, nutmeg, and alter- 
nately, 2 x/ 2 cups flour sifted 
with 34 teaspoon salt, and 3 
tablespoons sour milk in 
which 1 teaspoon soda has 
been dissolved. Chopped 
nuts may be added. Drop by 
teaspoons on buttered tins. 
Bake in hot oven until light 
brown. Pictured at bottom 
of illustration. 

Date and Nat Sticks— Beat 
2 eggs until light, add % cup 
powdered sugar, 1 cup each 
chopped walnuts and dates. 
Add 3 tablespoons flour grad- 
ually, sifted with 1 teaspoon 
baking powder and pinch of 
salt. 

Spread in shallow oblong 
pans, buttered. Bake in 
moderate oven. Cut in strips 
before cold. Shown in upper 
left hand corner. 

87 



88 



Photoplay Magazine for January, 1934 




•• W hvn a man begins to 
take you for grant eil* looh 
out! Capture for gourself 
glamorous eomplexion 
loveliness the tvuy the Sereen 
Stars do. 3Men are always 
stirred by lovely shin!" 



She knows her husband really loves her still, and yet 
something that was precious has been lost. She is taken 
for granted, neglected. Love has grown humdrum, stale. 



DON'T let love grow humdrum!" 
This is the warning Helen Twelve- 
trees sends to the many perplexed 
women who write this charming screen 
star for advice. 

"When a man begins to take you 
for granted," she says, "look out!" 

Then she tells Hollywood's secret 
of winning — and holding — adora- 
tion. " Capture for yourself glamorous 
complexion loveliness. You can do 
it the way the screen stars do. Men 



Photoplay Magazine for January, 1934 





She learns the Hollywood secret — that a velvet-smooth, 
tender skin has a charm men can't resist. She begins to 
use the Hollywood way to this complexion loveliness. 



She begins to live over again the thrill of honeymoon 
days! Eager eyes search the new, seductive beauty of her 
face. Now love is glamorous again, life is colorful, gay! 



are always stirred by lovely skin!" 

Of the 694 important Hollywood 
actresses, including all stars, actually 
686 use Lux Toilet Soap to keep their 
complexions always lovely. It is the 
official soap in all the large film 
studios. 

Don't be satisfied with a skin that 
just "gets by." Have a skin flawlessly 
lovely— irresistible. Begin today to use 
fragrant, white Lux Toilet Soap regu- 
larly, just as Helen Twelvetrees does! 




the Beauty 
Soap of the 
Stars make 
your skin 
Lrlamorous 



Ask The A 



nswei 



M 



an 




It's too late to run out now, Charlie. The old Answer Man has broken 
down and here confesses everything to your growing army of admirers 



CHARLES BUTTERWORTH gave the 
tall, dark and handsome heroes a run for 
honors this month. The readers are just 
crazy about his line of comedy and his daffy 
expressions, and call him a first-rate picture 
stealer. They are so persistent in asking about 
him, that I'll just have to confess all I know. 

Although he has often been taken for an 
Englishman, Charlie is an Indiana boy, born 
in South Bend, July 26, 1899. As a lad his one 
ambition was to be a piano tuner. This idea 
fell through when he woke up to the fact that 
he was graduating from Notre Dame Univer- 
sity with a law degree. And all the time he 
thought he was studying medicine. He passed 
the Indiana State bar exams and hung out his 
shingle. Two years it hung and then he de- 
cided he would try journalism. Wrote the 
obituary of a prominent South Bend citizen, 
only to find that the man wasn't even sick. 
For this he was fired. 

Took to doing a single in vaudeville and 
played every barn that would book his act. 
Bookings became scarce and he secured a job 
as secretary to J. P. McEvoy, playwright and 
humorist. Through J. P. he was cast in "Amer- 
icana," in which he delivered his famous "Ro- 



90 



tary Club" speech and sent the audience into 
convulsions. Following this he played promi- 
nent stage roles in "Allez Oop," "Good Boy," 
and "Sweet Adeline." While appearing in the 
latter, Warners signed him up and he made 
his movie bow in "The Life of the Party" 
with Winnie Lightner. 

Charlie is 5 feet, 7 inches tall; weighs 135 
and has light brown hair and blue eyes. His 
sole interest in politics is to study the ward- 
robes of the Congressmen. He gets grand ideas 
for funny costumes from them. He is very 
fond of fishing, but always falls asleep on the 
job. Can't you just hear him say, "Ah, the 
pity of it?" He is also fond of tennis, swim- 
ming and motoring. Has a wire-haired terrier 
who answers to the name of "Jerry." 

In the summer of 1932 Charlie left pictures 
and returned to Broadway to play in "Flying 
Colors." It was during the run of this play 
that he and Ethel Kenyon were married. 
Later he returned to pictures. His grand work 
in "Penthouse" with Warner Baxter won him 
a long term contract with M-G-M. 

Helen Lantz, Chicago, III. — William 
Haines has deserted pictures and is devoting 



Read This Before Asking Questions 

Avoid questions that call for unduly long an- 
swers, such as synopses of plays. Do not inquire 
concerning religion, scenario writing, or studio em- 
ployment. Write on only one side of the paper. 
Sign your full name and address. For a personal 
reply, enclose a stamped, self-addressed envelope. 



Casts and Addresses 

As these take up much space, we treat such sub- 
jects in a different way from other questions. For 
this kind of information, a stamped, self-addressed 
envelope must always be sent. Address all inquiries 
to Questions and Answers, Photoplay Magazine, 
22i W. 57th St., New York City. 



all his time to interior decorating. John Beal 
has returned to the New York stage. 

Lena Worhlet, Bluefield, W. Va. — The 
following stars appeared in "The Big Parade" 
— John Gilbert, Renee Adoree, Hobart Bos- 
worth, Claire McDowell, Claire Adams, Robert 
Ober, Tom O'Brien, Karl Dane and Rosita 
Marstini. 

Bonnie Ray Tyler, Moline, III. — Bonnie, 
how did you like the Jack LaRue story in our 
November issue? Some of the stars who cele- 
brate their birthdays in August are Dolores Del 
Rio, Sylvia Sidney, Myrna Loy, Buddy Rogers, 
Ann Dvorak, Ann Harding, Charles Farrell, 
Norma Shearer and Madge Evans. 

Helen Mattison, Exeter Boro, Penn. — 
Helen, when you ask questions, you certainly 
asks 'em. I'd have to sit down and write a 
book in order to give the information on the 
thirty-six stars you ask about. You see, actors 
and actresses come and go and it is rather a 
problem to keep track of them once they leave 
the screen. Lois Moran and Jean Arthur are 
appearing in plays on Broadway. Dolores Del 
Rio and Johnny Mack Brown are busy making 
pictures. Enid Bennett played the part of 
Jackie Cooper's mother in "Skippy." Send a 
stamped return envelope for the rest of the 
information. I haven't space for it here. 

Several Latin Women, Buenos Aires, 
S. A. — By the looks of the two-toned typing, 
two of you girls must have played a duet on the 
keys. Well, your "Prince of Dreams," Gene 
Raymond, was born in New York City on 
August 13, 1908. He is 5 feet, 10 inches tall; 
weighs 157 and has blond hair and blue eyes. 
Was educated in private schools. Entered 
pictures in 1931. Watch for him in "Brief 
Moment," "Flying Down to Rio" and "The 
House on 56th Street." His favorite recrea- 
tion is horseback riding. 

James Ryan, Mathmen, Mass. — In the 
English version of "Paddy, the Next Best 
Thing" made in 1923, Lillian Douglas played 
the role of Eileen, Paddy's sister. Darby 
Foster portrayed Laurence Blake which Warner 
Baxter did in the American talkie version. I 
have no information on the others you men- 
tion. 

A Fan, Clifton Forge, Va. — Dick Powell 
and Ruby Keeler will be seen together again. 
"Sweethearts Forever" is the picture. 

Alice Murdach, Bremerton, Wash. — 
Conrad Veidt was born in Berlin, Germany, 
January 22, 1893. He is 6 feet, 2 inches tall; 
weighs 165 and has brown hair and blue-gray 
eyes. Has been in pictures since 1917. In 
1927 and 1928 he made pictures in America. 



Photoplay Magazine for January, 1934 



9 1 



Design for Acting 

[ CONTINUED FROM I'AT.I SO 



resembles strikingly. Of course, the baby's so 
cute, they probably didn't even know I was in 
the picture. 

"Nothing like a baby to steal scenes — but if 
a scene has to be stolen, there isn't anyone 
I'd rather give it to! - ' 

SHE says it is a great relief not to have the 
responsibility of stardom any longer. And 
she means it. 

"I'm tired of taking the blame if the picture 
isn't good. Then, too, a star's years on the 
screen are limited. The featured player has 
many years. A star has too much footage in 
the picture." 

Helen is the screen's Premiere Mistress of 
Contradictions. 

She looks so exquisitely angelic — and usually 
plays naughty girls. 

" Naturally, I don't want to be typed," she 
said, "but the fact remains — usually the bad 
girls are the good parts. 

"Seems to me I'm the perpetually pure-at- 
heart street-walker, always drooping over bars 
while some director says, 'Now, Helen, you 
must be very sweet about this naughty line. 
Remember, you haven't the faintest idea what 
it means!' " 

Helen says she never gets tired of working, 
and she never intends to stop. 

"I don't know what to do when I'm idle, 
having worked steadily since leaving school. 
I hope to work always, until I'm a doddering 
old character woman, even if I have to pay 
them to let me!" 

But Helen admits she is going to leave the 
screen again for a little while (whisper), be- 
cause sometime she wants her young son, Jack 
■\Yoody, Jr., to have a little sister. 

And then the last and best of Helen Twelve- 
trees' four lives will be magnificently com- 
plete! 




wac amlle n. 



MOTHER GOOSE a la HOLLYWOOD 

Stan Laurel has no fat 
His partner has no lean, 
And so betwixt them both 
They make a good screen team 




These knitted outfits started out even. 
Same manufacturer. Bought in the 
same department store. Same price. 
Same size. Same soft wooliness! 

In the picture above they are worn 
by the same baby. 

What makes the differences? The 
washing, my dears! The suit on the 
right was washed correctly with pure, 
fluffy IVORY SNOW which dissolves 
perfectly in LUKEWARM water. The 
other one wasn't. 

YOU CAN DO IT! 

In the column at the right are direc- 
tions for washing wools SAFELY. 
Read them carefully and follow them 
exactly to get perfect results. 



1. Lay garment on paper and cut or 
draw outline to show size. 

2. Make a generous lukewarm Ivory 
Snow suds. You can safely use enough 
SNOW to make big, rich suds because 
Ivory Snow is pure. 

3. Don't rub. A big fluffy Ivory Snow 
suds saves rubbing. Cup garment in 
your hands and squeeze suds through. 
Two sudsings are better than one. 

4. Rinse in 3 lukewarm waters of the 
same temperature as your SNOW 
suds. Squeeze out as much water as 
possible without twisting or wringing. 

5. Lay garment on your paper pattern 
and pull it back gently to size. Dry it 
flat away from heat. 




How Sylvia Changed Ruth Chatterton's Nose and Figure 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 37 ] 



That night she was very happy and humble. 
''I shall never forget Emil Jannings for giving 
me this part," she said. 

In a few months she was a sensation on the 
screen. She began to realize her importance, 
and many of the people she worked with did 
not like her. You see, they didn't understand 
that a stage actress has a different attitude 
from picture people. 

In Hollywood everybody is called by his 
first name. Ruth insisted upon being called 
"Miss Chatterton." 

Once when a fresh little office boy said, 
"Hello, Ruth," she was furious. 

ALL of this — her long wait for success, her 
sudden rise to fame and the fact that she 
wasn't popular with her set workers — made her 
nervous and tense. Once Ralph Forbes, who 
was then her husband, said to me, "Can't you 
do something to make Ruth's figure more 
supple?" 

"You bet I can," I said. For I knew that 
she needed grace and ease to put over her roles 
on the screen. 

You girls, in order to be graceful, must have 
supple muscles. You must never tighten up. 



To get rid of the tension which makes you stiff 
and awkward, massage your spine well every 
night and every morning, paying particular 
attention to the back of the neck. That's 
where the tenseness is. Then with your hands 
work under the shoulder muscles, so your arms 
will be free and graceful. Whenever a muscle 
is tight, dig into that muscle and massage the 
nervousness right out of it. Act as if you were 
a football player or a prize-fighter and that you 
were your own trainer. Those men are always 
supple because their muscles are kept limbered 
up. 

Take plenty of stretching exercises. Dance 
by yourself to a good snappy tune on the radio. 
Whenever you feel yourself getting tense, relax 
every muscle in your body. You must think 
of it constantly, but this continual remember- 
ing to relax will give you grace and poise. Take 
it easy, girls. 

Put pep and spring into your walk but keep 
those muscles supple. Grace will do wonders 
for your figure and will cover a multitude of 
sins. 

As I've said, Ruth didn't need to go on a 
strenuous reducing diet. One of her favorite 
dishes is fish. One night as I was leaving, 



Ralph Forbes called me into the kitchen and 
said, "Here — take these fish. I'm fed up with 
fish. I never wish to see another one again." 
There were six lovely mountain trout and I 
took them gladly, but I've often wondered 
what Ruth said to Ralph when she found that 
he had given them away. 

As a matter of fact, Ruth needed fish in her 
diet. 

You see, since she was so nervous, she could 
not have stimulating food. 

She loved steaks — which are not good for a 
nervous person. She liked highly seasoned 
food which I would not let her have. I would 
not allow her to use pepper. 

T\ 7HEN you're suffering from nerves you 
** must stay away from these stimulating 
foods. You must eat the simplest dishes, 
cooked simply. 

Heavy meats and high seasonings are abso- 
lutely out! And don't forget it! I never let 
Ruth Chatterton forget! 

Now get busy! You can completely remodel 
yourselves if you'll just do everything I tell 
you. But be careful of that nose massage. 
Take it easy! 



Answers by Sylvia 



CORRECTING BAD POSTURE 

Dear Madame Sylvia: 

You must help me with my posture. I have 
a horrible walk. My shoulders slope and my 
lower jaw sticks out. What can I do? 

F. G., Fort Smith, Ark. 

No one can help you with your posture but 
yourself! If your shoulders slope — hold them 
up. If your jaw sticks out — hold it in! You 
can take back-bending exercises to strengthen 
the muscles in your back. You can build your- 
self up generally and acquire some pep and 
vigor; but the task of holding up your shoulders 
and holding in your chin is a job that you do 
simply by having will power and stick-to-it- 
ive-ness. 

I've told this before but perhaps some of you 
don't remember it. A grand way to hold your 
shoulders up is to get a friend of yours to give 
you a good, hard sock on the back every time 
you slump. 

That will make you remember! 

DIET FOR COMPLEXION 

Dear Sylvia: 

Will you please repeat the complexion diet 
that you gave Jean Harlow? Thank you. 

Mrs. R. H. T., Pueblo, Colo. 

Okay — here you are! Once a month for'five 
days, consecutively, do this: Take a quart box 
of raspberries or cherries and, without rinsing 
them, put in cold water over a slow fire. Use 
just enough water to cover them. Boil slowly 
for about an hour. Spread a double layer of 
cheesecloth in a sieve and let the juice strain 
through this overnight. 

Drink a glass of this juice the first thing in 
the morning. 

Two hours after you've taken the juice drink 
a glass of skimmed milk. Drink a glass of 
skimmed milk every two hours until you've 
had six or seven glasses. 

Just before going to bed, drink a glass of 
grapefruit juice. 

When raspberries or cherries aren't in 

92 



TROUBLES, bothers, worries— 
what a joy it is, girls, to be able to 
help! You see here the kind of help- 
ful advice Aunt Sylvia gives others. 
If you want help, simply write Sylvia, 
care of PHOTOPLAY Magazine, 221 
West 57th Street, New York City, en- 
closing a stamped, self-addressed en- 
velope. No obligation — glad I can be 
of assistance. 

SYLVIA 



season use tomato juice instead. That will 
make your skin clear and beautiful. 

CORRECTING LINED EYES 

Dear Sylvia: 

I have lines around my eyes and wish there 
was something I could do before it is too late. 
B. H. T., St. Paul, Minn. 

It's a good thing to do something now but 
don't get the idea that it is ever too late. 
There's always time to be beautiful. Those 
lines come from nerves and strain. Every 
night before you go to sleep, lie in bed and 
very gently, in a rotating movement, lightly 
massage at the corner of each eye — the comer 
nearer the ears. 

Then, with the eyes closed, gently tap the 
eyelids with the cushions of the fingertips. 
Also work with your two hands at the spine at 
the nape of the neck. People with lines around 
their eyes are usually nervous. Relax as much 
as you can. 

FATTY LUMPS 

My Dear Madame Sylvia: 

I've taken the hip exercises you have given 
and find them wonderful, but there's one stub- 
born lump of fat just above the hips that won't 
come off. Can you tell me something to do for 
that? Also I want to take this time to tell you 
that I have enjoyed your recent radio pro- 
grams immensely. 

R. W., New York City 



I'm glad you like the programs. I have a lot 
of fun doing them. Now about those lumps of 
fat. Certainly, there are lots of stubborn 
lumps that exercise won't take off. But you 
can squeeze those lumps off with your own two 
hands. 

Just dig in and squeeze and don't be afraid 
of hurting yourself. Then put a Turkish towel 
over the lump and pound on it with the flat of 
your hand. 

Squeeze and pound — that will take bumps 
down. 

WHEN PEP IS LACKING 

Dear Sylvia: 

I don't know what's wrong with me. I seem 
to be physically okay, but I just don't have 
any pep. What should I do? 

B. McD., Washington, D. C. 

Maybe you're anemic. In that case you 
should eat plenty of liver and drink as much 
turnip-top juice as you can. Also liver extract. 
Maybe you're eating too much rich food and 
not getting enough exercise. Eat simple foods 
cooked simply. 

Begin the morning with a cool shower and 
a good rub with a rough towel. 

Then exercise for fifteen minutes. You 
didn't tell me whether you are over or under 
weight, so it's hard for me to advise. 

SMOOTHING A WRINKLED NECK 

Dear Madame Sylvia: 

My complexion is pretty good but the skin 
on my neck is coarse and lined. How can I 
correct this defect? 

C. V., Chattanooga, Tenn. 

The reason your neck is lined is because you 
don't treat it as well as you treat your face. 
Whenever you use cold cream and lotions on 
your face use them on your neck, too. And 
when you're massaging your face carry the 
strokes on to your neck. Lots of girls neglect 
the tender skin of the neck. Get in the habit of 
giving it careful attention. 



Photoplay Magazine for January, 1934 



'Til Be at Doc Law's 



V99 



[ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 31 ] 

put on a benefit performance and raised about 
six hundred dollars for the homeless people. 
This Catholic father came from there, and he 
said he'd give anything to meet Will Rogers. 

"Right at that minute, believe it or not, in 
Bill walked! Of course, I introduced the 
priest, who grabbed him, and I thought he was 
going to wrestle him right there. He was 
pumping Bill's arm and telling him what a 
great fellow he thought he was. That sincere 
enthusiasm warmed my heart. 

"The funny part of it is that before he left, 
Bill was talking to him just as if he was a cow- 
boy pal of his." 

"TNOC drew a large beaker of foaming three- 
■'-^point-two from the suds-dripping nozzle 
of his new drug-store department, and raised 
it above his close-clipped Buffalo Bill goatee. 

"The night beer came back," he related, "I 
had a hunch. Bill would be dropping in. You 
know he doesn't touch tobacco in any form or 
any kind of hard liquor, but he does enjoy a 
good glass of beer every now and then. Of 
course, I knew that there wasn't any use of 
having any beer at the store, because you 
couldn't get enough then to last a minute, so I 
kept what I could get hold of up at the house. 

"Sure enough, Bill wandered in a little later 
and said he would kind of like to sample the 
new stuff so he'd know what everybody was 
talking about 

" ' Come on up to the house, then,' I told 
him, 'and we'll see what it's like.' 

" 'Okay, Doc,' said Bill. 

"So we tried out the brew in the kitchen of 
my house, which, of course, isn't anything like 
the place Bill's got up there on the hill. But 
that never made any difference to him. He's 
happiest, I think, when he's comfortable in his 
overalls, boots and an old slouch hat, and when 
he's in plain surroundings — so I didn't worry 
about serving the refreshments in the kitchen. 

"Speaking about houses, I remember one 
time I told Bill if I ever got enough money, I 
was going to build me a house high up on a 
hill, all by itself. 

"T already got one,' said Bill, 'but that 
doesn't mean a thing. Why, I never know 
what I'll meet on that trail leadin' down the 
hill from my place. You ought to see the 
critters that gather along that stretch.' 

'"""["HEN Bill grinned and told me about the 

*■ time not long ago when he was leaving in a 
hurry for the East. His wife rushed around 
the house packing his suitcases and getting him 
ready to leave in double time so he could make 
the train which left in a few minutes. 

"Bill rushed out of the house and on down 
the driveway to the gate, and there was a 
whole crowd of people waiting for him. Sales- 
men, solicitors, autograph hunters and people 
that had always wanted to meet him, waiting 
for him to come out. He was in an awful 
hurry, but he couldn't just pass right on by all 
those people waiting there to see him. It 
wouldn't have been nice, he said. So he 
stopped and talked to all of them. 

' 'When I got through,' Bill said, 'doggone 
if I hadn't missed the train!' 

"What's that?" queried Doc Law. "Why 
doesn't he keep his gate locked? Oh, he does. 
It's locked all the time — tighter 'n a drum. 
But that doesn't keep anybody out. 

"No, because the key is hanging right 
around the back of the gate-post; it's easy to 
reach around there and get it. Everybody 
knows that. How do they know it? Why, he 
tells them, of course!" 

Doc Law grinned and shook his head ex- 
pressively as he hurried away up the counter to 
assist a customer. 

"That's Bill Rogers," he chuckled over his 
shoulder. 



Elided \-Yyy^znu Wru, 
o&mmjyn ioy cyvd of 10 ujcrwwa 



93 



Ol£A 



/ 





• Strange that no one ever did any- 
thing about them! Until Phoenix 
decided that never again need any 
woman wear a stocking top that: 
1— Gagged the thighs. 2 — Drifted 
around on the knees. 3 — Failed to 
meet the garters. 4 — Bunched up 
clumsily because it was too long. . . 
So Phoenix launched Custom-Fit Top, 
which stretches both ways. It fits you 
as though it had been made for you 
and you alone. And it can be gartered 
to any length without fear of garter 
runs. Phoenix Custom-Fit Top is smart 
Hollywood's choice. Women like the 
"long mileage" foot and Certified 
Silk, too. The pair, $1 to $1.95. 



PHOENIX 

"GIBSON GIRL" 

COLORS 

For wear wifh the lovely 
off-shades of the early 
1900's which have been 
revived for our Fall 
costumes — Phoenix has 
created "Gibson Girl" 
Hosiery colors. Tally-ho, 
Tandem, Brownstone — 
and many others! See 
them in your favorite 
shop, and consult the 
free Phoenix Customers' 
Individual Fashion Serv- 
ice found on the counter. 



HER FROCK — a custom model by 
TRAVIS BANTON, Hollywood's famous 
designer. HER HOSE— PHOENIX with 
CUSTOM-FIT TOP. JUNE CLYDE of 
Universal wears this costume (Above). 



PHOEIMIX HOSIERY 
wiih CUSTOM-FIT TOP 




First Aid For The 
Gift Shopping List 



By Carolyn Van Wyck 



a gay lipstick that does wonders for a particular 
person, a powder that brings forth all the 
natural beauty of her skin, a perfume that is 
memorable, you cannot be quickly forgotten. 

And here let me add a thought in this matter 
of perfume giving. To be fine and in perfect 
taste, perfume need no longer be an expensive 
consideration, for you can buy costly brands 
now in small vials, perfect for the purse or 
dressing-table. Realizing the urgency of these 
lean years, many manufacturers have been 
\\ ise enough to bottle their precious fragrances 
in junior bottles, well within reach of every- 
one. Coupled with a gay handkerchief, the 
smallest of perfume remembrances will grace 
M>ck, tree or package with delight. 

Then there are your more de luxe perfume 
confections, a number of which are pictured 
in the front pages of this department, where 
creative art has inspired nectar and ambrosia 
in scents as well as containers of great beauty. 

Considering gifts from the very practical 



A B O V E , 

/\ F I o r i n e 

McKinney illus- 
trates a new idea 
in cream applica- 
tion. That rubber 
applicator helps 
cleanse, tone and 
clear the skin. Be- 
low, Dolores Del 
Rio, between 
scenes for "Fly- 
i n g Down to 
Rio," dusts pow- 
der from lashes 
and brows with a 
small, thin brush. 



V\ THAT in all the world, except an engage- 
** ment or wedding ring, has that sweet 
mystery and sentimental appeal of a Christmas 
gift package? There, safe in its tissue wrap- 
pings and gay ribbon, lies a token for just you. 
You may guess what it is, even shake it, smell 
it, but you cannot know. And if you are good 
and really want the full benediction of a Merry 
Christmas, you will not open it until at least 
Christmas Eve. 

Every year Christmas shopping becomes 
more of a problem, largely, I think, because 
human imagination is forever deluging the 
shops with things to delight and thrill the 
feminine heart. 

Following the example of the Hollywood 
stars and giving beauty seems to me more in 
accord with this season than all the other gift 
notions rolled into one. Giving beauty some- 
how seems an enduring thought. It makes the 
giver unforgettable as it sometimes makes the 
receiver, too. If you have been wise to choose 

H 



OUR Christmas list is full 
of suggestions for gifts 
and will also tell you of the 
newest perfumes, powders 
and other grand things. It 
is yours on request, as well 
as hair, skin, manicure and 
personal daintiness leaflets. 
Enclose separate stamped, 
self-addressed envelope for 
each leaflet. Carolyn Van 
Wyck, PHOTOPLAY 
Magazine, 221 West 57th 
Street, New York City. 



aspect, where is the woman who is not grate- 
ful for a combination of cleansing cream, night 
cream and tonic — the basic beauty prepara- 
tions? You may purchase these separately, 
or more likely find them combined in attrac- 
tive sets in all prices and sizes. 

Lipsticks usually make a big hit. There are 
myriad grand ones from which to choose, as 
well as combination packages of different tones. 
One box contains three in popular tones suit- 
able for all types, according to whim. A smart 
affair in black and white comes for the evening 
bag. 

A manicure kit gift often starts the receiver 
well on the path to lovely fingertips. And 
what is more important today? You can buy 
these from practical, modest sets at about fifty 
cents on upward. This idea is a life-saver for 
the small sister who bites her nails or is care- 
less about them. Give her a kit and watch 
the transformation. 

TF the Christmas spirit completely overcomes 
-'■you and you want to do a true human kind- 
ness to friend, sister, mother or grandmother, 
remember the permanent wave certificates that 
many shops feature at Christmas. A gay cer- 
tificate, resembling a counterfeit bill, reminds 
the receiver that a permanent wave awaits her 
whenever she would like to make an appoint- 
ment. Here is a gift whose beauty is lasting 
and uplifting. 

Compacts are never superfluous on the gift 
list. Where is the girl who ever had too 
many? These are modern day budget sug- 
gestions, too. One that caught my eye re- 
cently is gold washed in appearance with em- 
bellishment of simulated coral or turquoise, 
guaranteed to add a touch of glamour to any 
user. The wooden ones are cunning, too, and 
sometimes permit the addition of metal ini- 
tials, a very personal idea. For the girl who 
likes lots of powder, those big, pan-cake 
affairs are perfect. Formerly, they were models 
of luxury, but charming ones now come for a 
dollar or less. 

Lovely perfume bottles, atomizers and pow- 
der boxes always send me into a dither. I 
want them all, and, apparently, so do others. 
A gift of this type is always as welcome as a 
glorious day. It doesn't matter how many one 
has; a new arrival always gets first place. 

WHEN you come to the male members of 
your family, remember them in this class, 
too. There are the usual shaving appurte- 
nances, often topped with an after-shave lotion. 
This makes a big hit. Don't I know how 
brothers, husbands and fathers ransack the 
bath cabinet, often stealing our favorite lotion 
in lieu of possessing one themselves? 

For the person interested in her home, 
imagination runs riot. There is a fine soap 
that you can buy literally by the yard. A 
yard, cut in convenient rectangles, is nicely 
boxed. There are a dozen and one gadgets 
that any bathroom will welcome and that can 
be used by a whole family. 

If you go haywire on this job of last-minute 
gift shopping, I suggest that you walk through 
the toilet goods department of any good shop. 
You will not be at loss for long. 

With this beauty giving idea in mind, you 
bring to this season of seasons some of the 
meaning of that first star over Bethlehem and 
help make it a Happy and Merry Christmas. 








30 "0 

o O j> 

c 2 

n 5 





3? 



A strange discovery. ..an exciting test 

Faded skin blooms again with new life 



Women have proved what a scientist believed: that a natural substance 
in Junis Cream produces remarkable results when applied to skin. 



YOUTH at middle age is more 
alluringthan at seventeen. What 
a pity then that by the time most 
women reach 40, youth has departed 
from their skins. 

A scientist knew that as skin grows 
old it loses a certain substance — a 
substance which makes skin fresh, 
alluring — glamorous. So he got some 
of this natural substance in pure 
form. He put it into the finest facial 
cream he could develop. Women tried 
it and their skins grew clearer, more 
transparent. Age lines melted into 
the soft curves of youth. Skin 
awakened. 

Sebisol- what it is 

The natural skin-softening sub- 
stance the scientist put into Junis 
Cream he named sebisol. Sebisol is 
part of the chemical substance of 



your own skin. It is essential to every 
living cell. It is so rare, we had to 
search the world to find a sufficient 
supply. Pepsodent Junis Cream con- 
tains pure sebisol. That, we believe, 
explains why Junis Cream does 
thrilling things. Whether sebisol alone 
brings these results we cannot say. 
But this we are told by women: 
Pepsodent Junis Cream does for their 
skins what other creams do not. 

You need ?io other cream 

As you apply Junis Cream, feel it 
penetrate and cleanse. Feel it soften 
and refresh. Note how rapidly it 
spreads — so light in texture. Thus 
you realize why Junis Cream is both 
a cleansing and a night cream. 

Many creams contain large quan- 
tities of wax. Junis Cream does not. 
Wax tends to clog the pores. 



PEPSOjesj 



We invite you to make this test 

Try Pepsodent Junis Cream at our 
expense. We believe you will be de- 
lighted with results. You be the 
judge. Junis Cream, we think, will 
thrill you as it has thousands of 
other women who have tried it. Send 
the coupon at once. 

THE PEPSODENT CO., CHICAGO 

NOTE : This offer is available only 
to residents of the United States. 



CREAM 

GENEROUS SUPPLY FREE m&'*m 

We want you to try Pepsodent 
Junis Facial Cream and see 
how truly revolutionary it is. 



Jin 



NAME.. 

ADDRESS 



JUNIS CREAM IS A PEPSODENT PRODUCT 



CITY. 



This coupon is not good after June 30. 193A 



^ 




Winners of $1,500 for Movie Muddles 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 73 



that one item which I will now be able to secure 
with ease is my monthly copy of Photoplay — 
my favorite magazine." 

PEGGY CASTLE, who was awarded third 
prize, revealed that her parents are in the in- 
terior of revolutionary torn Cuba. She added: 
"If I should be fortunate enough to win one of 
the prizes, it would, I think, make me believe in 
Santa Claus again. There is but one channel 
into which every cent would be poured — the 
perusal of literature. My star is a far-fetched 
one, but my one ambition in life has been to 
achieve a place in the literary world. Even to 
think that a stepping stone may be placed in 
my path seems almost too good to be true." 

And Myrtle Lubold, who was awarded 
fourth prize, wrote: 

"Were I to be so fortunate as to be the 
recipient of a Photoplay prize, I would con- 
sider same as a blessing bestowed in a time of 
urgent need. I have been upset of late, worry- 
ing how I would be in a position to remit for 



medical services rendered in a recent operation. 
Any surplus remaining would be expended 
toward the purchase of a winter coat for a 
dear friend who has been out of work for over 
three years. The latter in itself would be a 
service deeply appreciated and sorely needed. 

"It has been a real pleasure to compete in 
this Photoplay contest, as the problems were 
extremely interesting and enticing. Of course, 
I must admit that I was assisted greatly by 
the photographs illustrated in past copies of 
your wonderful magazine. Being a steady 
reader, I have learned to know the prominent 
movie stars by sight and the rest was a matter 
of careful planning and tireless patience." 

It was extremely evident that many readers 
of Photoplay look forward with interest to 
this annual contest. Letters accompanying 
many of the entries bear out that statement. 
Also — and this should encourage many who 
did not win a prize this year — many a prize- 
winner in this contest did not win with previous 
entries, but by coming back, won this time. 



Of course, this was not considered in award- 
ing prizes, for this was done without reference 
to anything but the entry itself; but later we 
found this to be true. So we say to all who 
did not win this time: "There will be another 
chance next year, and what you learned this 
time should help you then." 

A ND above all, Photoplay is happy to note 
•**the high degree of pleasure so many of its 
contestants took just in working out the 
Muddles, entirely apart from prizes. Many 
of them wrote to say how much enjoyment it 
gave them to test their knowledge and skill in 
this way, and that should they win a prize, it 
would be just that much extra enjoyment. 

Unquestionably, this year's Movie Muddles 
were a source of keen enjoyment in themselves 
— and Photoplay is happy to have offered a 
contest so pleasing from its very nature, with- 
out regard to the prizes offered. 

The prize winners, in addition to the first 
four named, are as follows: 



Additional Prize Winners 



$10 PRIZE WINNERS 

Madeline E. Baker 
698 McMillam Ave., Winnipeg, Canada 

Otto Raabe 
1103 Douglas, Burlingame, Calif. 

Miss Consuelo Romero 
138 S. Townsend St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Herbert W. Jarand 

56 Willowdale Ave., Outremont, Montreal. Q. 

Canada 

Luis Zaldidor 
2-A Industria 56, Tacubaya, Mexico 

Mrs. Charles O. Greenlee, Jr. 
523 N. 9th St., Fort Dodge, Iowa 

Kenneth D. Burdick 
24 N. 10th St., Kansas City, Kan. 

Evelyn L. Svedeman 
82 Seaver St., Stoughton, Mass. 

Catherine Quinn 
4th Floor, Watson Bldg., Cleveland, Ohio 

Mrs. J. K. Dyer 
2094 Monroe Ave., Memphis, Tenn. 

Marie E. Lewis 
542 N. E. San Rafael St., Portland, Ore. 

R. J. McGrath 
833 University Ave., Syracuse, N. V. 

Charles Woodhams 
4430}4 N. Seeley Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Helen C. Barker 
5823 Christian St., Philadelphia. Penna. 

Miss Lillie Neyphe 
2136 X. W. 12th St., Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Mrs. Mamie Cardarel 
66 S. Myrtle St., Vineland, N. J. 

W. B. McGrew 
2320 E. 9th St., Des Moines, Iowa 

Mrs. Richard B. Smith 
933 Main St., Honesdale, Penna. 

Carl O. Froelich 
2125 S. 88th St., West Allis, Wis. 

Mrs. Helen Spears 
817 N. Main St., Mitchell, S. D. 



Mrs. R. H. Houghton 

3605 19th Ave., Kenosha, Wis. 

Charles Stevenson 
P. O. Box 791, Menlo Park, Calif. 

Mary Alice Gray 
1027 8th Ave., New Brighton, Penna. 

Mary C. Miller 
866,4 N. Jefferson St., Springfield, Mo. 

Erica Haxka Gorecki 

c/o Bastable & Co., 15 E. 53rd St., New York, 

N. Y. 

Mrs. Palmer M. Hanson 
Scobey, Mont. 

Mrs. Madeline N. Ward 
4716 Lyndale Ave., So., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Eleanor R. Dusbane 
254 S. Cayuga St., Williamsville, N. Y. 

Mrs. Kathryn Schmidt 
780 N. Avalon, Memphis, Tenn. 

Clarence Frommader 
R. R. 2, Ft. Atkinson, Wis. 

Dorothy Grimes 
420 W. 65th St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Daniel Ross 
1138 S. Richmond St., Chicago, 111. 

Anna Pschampke 
4943 W. 8th St., Philadelphia, Penna. 

Elizabeth LaFine 
1509 S. Central Park Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Martha M. Rippell 
90 N. Pearl St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Ingerid Arvesen 
4325 W. 6th St., Duluth, Minn. 

Leona Luther 
1425 S. 88th St., West Allis, Wis. 

Anna C. Glass 
3815 W. Grenshaw St., Chicago, 111. 

John L. Thompson 
235 S. Hood St., Lynchburg, Va. 

Margaret T. Howell 
112 S. Milton Ave., Clarendon, Va. 



$5 PRIZE WINNERS 

Mary Elizabeth Jones 
241 Shaubut St., Mankato, Minn. 

Boris Belsky 
2703 Buot St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Betty Allenwood 
1635 Lewis Drive, Lake Wood, Ohio 

Jennie Broudy 
440 E. 67th St., Chicago, 111. 

Mrs. Arthur J. Ess 
515 Griggs Place, E. Aurora, N. Y. 

Tom Allen 
15 Laird St., Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, Canada 

Herman H. Lefkowitz 
1216 Laugham Ave., Camden, N. J. 

Mrs. E. D. Lintz 
Warrington, Fla. 

Miss Wynona Bacon 
1630 California St., Denver, Colo. 

Miss Elizabeth Ferris 
Macon, Miss. 

Marion L. Harrington 
38 Gard Ave., Bronxville, N. Y. 

Elise A. Meyer 
2836 Lombardy Ct., Augusta, Ga. 

Mrs. George Foley 
1000 16th St., Racine, Wis. 

Mrs. Fred Naiden 
408 N. 9th St., Marshalltown, Iowa 

Mrs. Hallis Webster 
4626 W. Capitol Drive, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Wm. J. Brazier 
Box 8, Woodbury Heights, N. J. 

Mrs. J. R. Perry 
544 E. Main St., New Iberia, La. 

Mrs. Mary Bookw alter 
160 E. 11th St., Upland, Calif. 

Theodore Torrison 
4023 Quail Ave., Robbinsdale, Minn. 

Miss Maud Petithory 
P. O. Box 1228, Jacksonville, Fla. 

Mrs. Anna Hasenzahl 
63 Rossford Ave., Ft. Thomas, Ky. 



96 



Photoplay Magazine for January, 1934 






Mrs. Anna Palmer 
922 S. Kennilworth Ave., Oak Park, 111. 

Millie Williams 
116 N. 6th St., Box 795, Livingston, Mont. 

Mrs. R. M. Bf.xmxghoff 
North Main St., Columbiana, Ohio 

Alma Herman 
723 E. 8th St., Little Rock, Ark. 

Versa Marie Jenks 
3800 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, Colo. 

Joseph Kocik 
3434 Highland Ave., Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

Miss Lillian Graham 
309 Arcadian Ave., Waukesha. Wis. 

Mrs. Gaylord A. Wood 
4310 N. Pennsylvania St., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Dorothy A. Wilson 
4330 W. Beach, Gulfport, Miss. 

Garry Richardson 
1925 Pine St., Murphysboro, 111. 

Mildred L. Murphy 
9J4 Mill St., Athens, Ohio 

Miss Carol L. Graham 
340 Church St., Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

Frances H. Mellor 
70 Maplewood Ave., Maplewood, N. J. 

Leon Nurnberg 
121 S. 25th St., Omaha, Neb. 

H. E. Kerr 
1102 Shelby St., Seattle, Wash. 

David C. Mayfield 
1629 Clarkson St., Denver, Colo. 

Mrs. Henry Veazey 
R. R. 1, Auburn, Ind. 

Alice Pearson 
5324 Meridian, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Yvette Wilcox 
240 N. Larchmont Blvd., Los Angeles. Calif. 




MOTHER GOOSE a la HOLLYWOOD 

Hickory, dickory, dock 
Two mice ran up the clock 
The clock struck one 
"Which one?" Schnoz puns 
Hickory, dickory, dock 



KGDL 

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Ka>i 



KGDL 



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CORK TIPPED 



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Three good reasons KOOLS 
■will become your favorite ciga- 
rette: They're mildly menthol- 
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matter how often you light up. 
They're cork-tipped; won't stick 
to lips. And each package carries 
a FREE coupon — 85 bring a 
bridge set (2 decks) of initialed 
Congress Quality U. S. Playing 

Cards other premiums. (Offer 

good in U.S.A. only). 

CELLOPHANE WRAPPED 

Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp., 
Louisville, Ky. 



CORK-TIPPED...! 5* /br TWENTY 



Look Out, Jack, for "Ma"! 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 45 ] 



You gotta get attention in this game, you 
know. So try to understand." 

"Tsk," was all Ma said as she peered behind 
the couch in Jack's dressing-room and ex- 
tracted three socks unmated, an old sweater 
and some other miscellany. 

" *Y"OU see," Jack went on, "a fella's got to 

*■ live up to his reputation. So don't think 
it funny no matter what I do. I mean they 
expect it — see. It's all a part of the game. 
There's always someone around to pick up that 
stuff and it's good publicity. 

" You gotta do it if you want to get ahead. 
I don't want you to be embarrassed, or any- 
thing, Ma. Course I know you won't under- 
stand about the publicity angle or — " 

" What's that bicycle doing out there? " Ma 
interrupted. 

"Oh, belongs to one of the messenger boys, 
I guess. I — " At the look of interest on her 
face, Jack stopped. And stared. "Ma, listen, 
you ain't — " 

"My, it looks like such a nice bicycle. I 
haven't ridden a bicycle for years. I was just 
thinking, Jack, I'll bet I could ride it clear 
around this parkway three times without fall- 
ing off more than twice." 

"Ma, you wouldn't." 

But Ma was off. Zip. Around the bend she 
tore while Four Marxes coming unexpectedly 
around the corner, took to the fire escapes. 
"Yoo hoo, Jack, look," she called at the first 
lap, "I'm still on." 

At the sound of the revelry (and did Ma put 
it on!) there was a sudden opening of dressing- 
room doors. Heads, famous heads, were thrust 
out. 

At the second lap there were cheers from the 
grandstand. Ma was going over big. 

"Let go the handle bars," the Marx Brothers 
urged from the various fire escapes. Bing 
Crosby and Gary Cooper leaned from their 
dressing-room windows. 

"Give her more rope, Ma," Gary called. 

At the third lap there was wild acclaim. 
" Shucks, I could do better if I had more room," 
Ma boasted. 

"Say, there's a swell place on the back lot," 
someone suggested, and that was enough. Ma, 
the bicycle and the former Oakie audience 
were off for the back lot while, on his dressing- 
room steps, alone and forsaken, sat Mrs. 
Offield's little boy, Jack. 

"Gee," he muttered to himself, "Gee, does 
Ma 'ketch on.' " 



He was right. Ma's famous ride made seven- 
teen movie columns and twenty-two headlines 
in three days. 

A %'ivacious, bright-eyed little person is this 
mother of Jack's, with a never-to-be-downed 
spirit that catches and spreads to everyone 
about her. Exactly as a lighted match to a dry 
forest. And with the same devastating result. 
She's sure fire. 

She spends hours pouring over her scrap 
book into which every line, every word that has 
ever been written about Jack, is pasted. But 
right alongside of it, and don't you forget it, is 
her own publicity. And she's had plenty of it 
in her amazing life. 

The daughter of a minister back in Sedalia, 
Mo., and the wife of a prominent banker, Ma 
was a pioneer in this business of getting out of 
a home and doing things. There never has 
been any mustiness in the front parlor of her 
life. 

The "Offield School of Expression" was 
famous in those parts. And those plays that 
Ma put on and directed! Dear me. Were they 
something? When her husband died and 
things went kind of wrong for this little woman, 
nothing daunted, she came on to Xew York 
with two children and seven dollars. And got 
a job teaching philosophy at Columbia Univer- 
sity. Made good, too. 

She's written several books of philosophy 
and some mighty good poetry and can wise- 
crack Jack out of his suspenders. She knows 
practically all the answers and it's no use. You 
can't keep her down. And now that she's 
launched herself on a movie career — look out. 
One small bit in "Too Much Harmony," and 
look where Ma is today. All over the place, as 
a matter of fact. 

"AND I'll just bet," she said, "there isn't 
■**-another movie actress in the business that 
has her own fan following before she even be- 
gins her career. Look at these. Dozens and 
dozens of letters from girls all over the country 
who have been my pupils. Now, show me 
another beginner with a following like that. 
Just show me." 

She phoned Jack at home one evening from 
the studio. "I'll be late, honey," she said. 

"Thought you finished your part this after- 
noon," Jack said. 

"Oh, I did, son. But there was such a nice 
little girl here from one of the magazines want- 
ing an interview with you, and two of the 
nicest gentlemen reporters from the papers 



wanting material. So, knowing you must be 
awfully tired and all, I told them not to bother 
you, son. I'd take the interviews, if they 
didn't mind. So I'm getting interviewed now." 

There was a gurgling sound at the other end 
of the phone. 

"And oh, Jackie, wait. You'd better just go 
ahead and eat dinner without me." 

"Why, Ma. Where you going?" 

"Well, I just thought I'd run over to the 
Brown Derby tonight and let myself be seen 
with the other stars. And I suppose I'll be 
signing autographs 'till all hours of the night, 
so you better not wait up for me." 

There was the sound of a falling body on the 
other end of the wire. 

AT the gala premiere of "Too Much Har- 
■*»-mony," there was Ma. Dressed to kill, and 
bowing from left to right. "Look, look," the 
fans said, nudging one another. "There's Mrs. 
Oakie. Yoo hoo, Mrs. Oakie, could we have 
your autograph?" And Jack held Ma's purse 
while Ma signed. And this, mind you, on one 
small bit in one picture. Heaven help Garbo if 
Ma ever gets going. You just can't down Ev. 
What it takes, Ev's got. 

"You know," she confided to Jack when the 
picture was about to be released, "I'd love to 
see how I'm going over in the big cities." 

" Great," roared Jack, "you're practically on 
your way." And hurried right out to buy Ma 
a ticket to New York. 

Now, he thought, I can get a little publicity 
for myself. A little for myself wouldn't be so 
bad for a change. 

Next day the headlines screamed the story, 
"Mrs. Oakie brings her own rocking chair to 
New York." Pages, columns, were written 
about Ma's chair. If she'd thought up a 
giraffe or a pet tiger, she couldn't have done 
better. And Ma sat blithely on in New York 
in her rocking chair being interviewed and 
photographed. And she rocked right on to 
Washington. Gathering the spotlight as a 
farmer gathers in the sheaves. 

While out in Hollywood a rather droopy 
young play boy sat forlornly on his dressing- 
room steps and thought. He didn't want to 
play anymore. Everyone was too busy watch- 
ing Ma to notice. 

There's one thing he knew. His Ma had 
given him a spanking. She'd stolen the 
thunder right out from under his nose. 

And even he had to grin about it. 

She's that cute. 



Do Screen Stars Act Like Human Beings? 



Although Dix is the biggest eater, it doesn't 
follow that he pays the largest checks. For 
instance, one afternoon, Joe says, young Junior 
Laemmle came in with Eph Asher and Director 
Charles Rogers for lunch. 

"Bring us a little caviar, Joe," Junior in- 
structed. "The doctor said I should eat 
caviar today." 

Joe did. At the Roosevelt, caviar is served 
at $2.50 a portion, but when Joe brought the 
portion, Junior told him to leave the box. Be- 
tween the three of them they ate all the caviar 
it contained. 

Consequently, Joe tendered a check for $38. 

"What, Joe — I'm not going to pay $38 for 
lunch here, am I? " Junior wanted to know. 

"Not if you don't want to, Mr. Laemmle," 
countered Joe. "But that's what you ate." 

98 



[ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 39] 

The gentleman who craves the most serv- 
ice, declares Joe, is David O. Selznick. Also 
he's the most liberal tipper to pay for it — but 
he wants what he wants when he wants it, 
and that's quick. He eats as fast as he talks, 
and just as soon as he is through, Joe knows 
he can lead another party to the table, be- 
cause he will be leaving right on the dot. 

Bill Powell and Carole Lombard, Joe says, 
in their days as a family team, ate full course 
dinners holding hands under the table. They 
still go places together. They like boneless 
roast squabs stuffed with apples and pears, 
finished off with plenty of Camembert cheese. 
Maurice Chevalier comes in with his eternal 
secretary, Max Ruppa, and spends quite a lot 
of money on his dinner, but exhibits something 
of the French thrift under the plate. Marlene 



Dietrich drops in occasionally for a cup of 
coffee — nothing more. 

Ruth Chatterton, Joe says, is one of the 
most gracious ladies he has ever met. Her 
broad "A" resounds throughout the room, but 
once, when a couple from out of town desired 
to be introduced, she not only acknowledged 
the introduction but invited them over to her 
table and insisted upon paying the check— or 
her husband (at that time Ralph Forbes) did. 

Walter Huston always calls up before he 
comes and tells Joe how many there will be in 
his party. "Whatever you fix will be fine, 
Joe," he says. But Walter likes best English 
mutton chops, veal kidneys with mushrooms, 
cole slaw and fresh asparagus. His favorite 
dessert is baked Alaska. 

But the Blossom Room really brightens up 



Photoplay Magazine for January, 1934 



to its very brightest when the Eddie Cantors 
stroll in. 

".Mr. Cantor always comes with Mrs. Cantor 
and his five daughters," says Joe, "and quite 
often he has a pal or two. from Tin Pan Alley 
with him, too. 'Fix us up a nice dinner, Joe,' 
he says, '<7 la carte' — he really means table 
d'hSte, you know. We never give him a check, 
because he never carries any money. We 
always sign his name, tip the waiter the 
amount he desires, and then send the whole 
bill to him at his house. He says he doesn't 
want to have a good dinner spoiled by seeing 
what it costs." 

Another father who takes the family out in 
a big way is John Holes. John comes to the 
Blossom Room with Mrs. Boles and his little 
girl, and his entire evening is spent seeing that 
his young daughter has a good time. It's 
"honey" this and "honey" that as long as the 
evening lasts, according to Joe, and John pays 
in cash. Doing an exact about-face to Eddie 
Cantor, he abhors bills. 

"Charlie Chaplin comes in here frequently 
with Paulette Goddard," Joe remarked, "and 
he is the easiest of our patrons to please. Un- 
like so many of the others, he does not like to 
be in the limelight. He doesn't want a table 
on the dance floor, but prefers to retire to some 
dark corner. His favorite dish is Chinese 
chicken with noodles — and if we haven't any 
on the menu, I run around to the Chinese 
restaurant nearby, get some, and warm it up 
for him. Miss Goddard often prefers an 
avocado salad, but both of them are always 
charming and very simple to please." 

Another salad hound is Lilyan Tashman, 
who generally arrives at about noon with a 
lady friend or two — never with hubby Ed- 
mund Lowe. And, although she is generally 
conceded to be the "best dressed woman in 
Hollywood," Joe has never seen her in any- 
thing but very simple, though most becoming, 
gowns. But she eats enough salad to stock a 
garden. 

JOAN CRAWFORD and Franchot Tone often 
J come to dinner together. Joan likes white 
chicken meat and salad with a dressing made 
of olive oil and lemon juice. In the early days, 
Joe remembers, Joan used to eat anything and 
everything, but that's all changed now that 
she rides a bicycle and thinks of her figure. 

Joan dotes on children. If she happens to 
see one at any other table in the room, she 
gets up and goes over for a visit. And the chil- 
dren always like her. 

Greta Garbo used to come frequently to the 
Roosevelt for lunch, in the summer when the 
roof-garden was open. 

"All she wants," says Joe, "is just to be left 
alone. I seat her in a corner and take her 
order myself. She is always reserved and 
dignified, but never high-hat; and she treats 
those who wait on her like gentlefolk. Nat- 
urally, she is stared at a great deal, but she 
ignores these curious eyes — quite unlike Charlie 
Farrell, who will smile back, or like Eric Von 
Stroheim, who will often stand up and acknowl- 
edge the stare with a stiff, military bow." 

Jack Warner, the producer, is the exact op- 
posite. He'll greet everybody in sight as 
"pal," meanwhile eating cheese strudel. 

Ernst Lubitsch, the director whose light, 
whimsical touch has made his naughty-naugh- 
ties so delightful, also is everybody's friend. 
He greets bus boys and waiters as well as Joe 
with a handshake — and eats his beloved Ger- 
man reinbralen with the other hand. 

Mary Brian always comes in with a coterie 
of boy friends — different ones each time. She 
dislikes any fuss or special attention, and se- 
lects at random from anything on the menu. 

Another great favorite with Joe Mann and 
his waiters is little Helen Twelvetrees. She is 
always sweet and charming. She relies largely 
upon Joe to select a meal for her. 

So if you want to know who is Hollywood's 
greatest hostess, who possesses the friendliest 
spirit among all the tinsel and glitter, who is 
the most dignified peisonage at table, Joe will 
tell you without even stumbling over a syllable. 



99 



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Katharine Hepburn's Inferiority Complex 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 53 



not good-looking enough. Besides, I don't be- 
lieve I can act. I'd be scared to death, up in 
front of all those people! Anyhow, I don't 
think my voice is strong enough." 

Instead, her parents more or less left her to 
her own devices. 

If she wanted to play theater, as a child, her 
mother let her ransack the trunks in the attic, 
for a suitable costume. 

If she decided to turn her bedroom into a 
stage set for the day, nobody scolded her for 
pulling the furniture around. (But she knew 
she must put it back before bedtime!) 

Let her sing and holler — it's good for her 
lungs! Let her run, and jump and climb and 
"skin-the-cat" — it makes her strong and 
husky. 

Of course she can "chin" herself as many 
times as the boy next door — why not? 

Katie has muscles strong as steel. Let her 
ride on her pony 'cross country — she'll learn to 
stick on. 

Let her skate, learn to shoot, play ball with 
the boys. 

" CHE grew up and developed free from in- 

^hibitions in her emotional life and with al- 
most immeasurable vision and imagination," 
Mr. Fielding commented. " In childhood, the 
fear of doing something contrary to the wishes 
of papa or mama, and thus inviting reprimand, 
was quite an unknown experience for her. As 
a consequence, she was able to meet life with- 
out fearing to displease and unafraid of doing 
the thing that is not 'proper.' " 

This, then, explains the unusual conduct of 
this new star, the conduct which made even 
cynical, gay Hollywood sit up and lake notice. 

When Katie sat on a curb on the studio 
lot and calmly read her mail, the cynics 
nodded and shouted, "publicity seeker." 

When Katie refused to arrange her hair in 
the conventional mode, when she preferred to 
wear denim overalls and a sweat-shirt, again 
she was branded, "publicity hound." 

The opinion never phased her. She ignored 
it. 

"The so-called goofy tactics she resorts to," 
Mr. Fielding explained, "are simply another 
evidence of her resourcefulness, her freedom 
and lack of fear. They retlect, too, her early 
training. Her mother never made her self-con- 
scious by telling her she looked silly, or scolding 
her with the phrase, 'Nice little girls don't act 
that way!'" 





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She had never been in a movie then ! 
But after the students at Bryn Mawr 
presented "The Lady of the Moon," 
Hepburn, as Pandora, posed while a 
classmate took this picture of Katie 



No, Katharine Hepburn certainly isn't self- 
conscious. Consequently she always feels 
adequate, or "up to" a situation. Take for ex- 



ample, the incident at the opening of her latest 
picture, "Little Women." 

They previewed this picture in a tiny theater 
in Santa Ana. After it had been running about 
five minutes, the film broke. Several more 
minutes elapsed. The operators were unable 
to fix it properly. The audience was getting 
impatient. Suddenly Katharine Hepburn 
jumped on the stage, unsolicited, wearing her 
slacks and sweater. 

She put on an impromptu "personal appear- 
ance" show which so thoroughly engaged the 
attention of the audience that they forgot 
about the broken film. While they saw no 
picture that night, they left the theater satis- 
fied and pleased because Hepburn herself had 
entertained them with gay, informal chatter. 

If she had been frightened or uncertain, her 
impromptu entertainment might have been a 
flop. No evidence of an inferiority complex 
there ! 

"Many people would say," we commented 
to Mr. Fielding, "that Hepburn traded in her 
inferiority complex for a superiority complex!" 

'""THERE is no such thing," he answered. 

-*- "People are either normal or inferior. 
People whom we call 'conceited' or believe to 
have a feeling of superiority are usually strug- 
gling with an inferiority complex. They are 
trying to innate their ego and make everybody 
see how smart they are, or how intelligent they 
are or how strong they are. They don't be- 
lieve it themselves, but they feel they must 
try to impress others. 

"No, I should say that Hepburn now has a 
very healthy, normal viewpoint. Her path 
is not cluttered up with foolish fears and in- 
hibitions. There are no obstacles, for she 
refuses to recognize them. She cannot con- 
ceive of wanting to do something that cannot 
be done. And when she wants to do a thing, 
it must be done quickly, without delay." 

His comment brought to mind the incident 
when Hepburn suddenly turned on her heel 
one day after finishing "Morning Glory," 
waved goodbye to friends on the lot and was 
off like a flash in a high-powered airplane for 
New York. Dressed in overalls, no baggage, 
no encumbrances. She wanted to go, so she 
went. There was no fear of being unable to 
travel without cosmetics, without extra 
clothes. 

She is free as a bird to do as she wishes 
when the impulse strikes her. 



And Now Taps Sound for Tex! 



CONTINUED FROM PACE 40 



do it. No one knew then that Von Stroheim 
would climb to the enviable heights of direc- 
torial stardom. None but Tex Guinan whose 
faith in his talent never faltered. 

JOE FRISCO, who stuttered his way to fame 
with the aid of a long, black cigar on which he 
chewed feverishly, was one of Tex Guinan's 
proteges. She saw Joe smoking nervously one 
evening at a corner table over a twenty-five 
cent bowl of goulash and a nickel cup of coffee. 
Tex burst out laughing — he looked so funny. 
Frisco told her his troubles. 
"Always look like that, honey — you're a 
scream when you're worried," she advised 
him. It was those few wise words which 
carried Frisco to the heights, even to pictures 
when talkies first came in. A grand comedian 
whom Tex saw as a living caricature. 



Tex told me, only a few months ago, about 
Ruby Keeler's first job in her big night club 
when Tex had prospered plenty and all society 
bargained for ringside seats. 

"A swell little kid," Tex described her, 
"scared to death of Broadway. She thought 
the big bad wolf was hiding somewhere ready 
to eat her. Then along came Jolson and took 
her right out of circulation." 

Ruby Keeler learned the intricacies of tap 
dancing at Guinan's club. She was almost an 
amateur at it when Tex took her on. But those 
twinkling feet became a main attraction, as, 
night after night, Ruby stepped out and went 
into her routine. That little girl always got a 
great big hand and Tex Guinan, perched high 
on her stool, barking raucously at her Park 
Avenue patrons, never had to beg them to 
pound on the tables. A din of applause always 



followed Ruby's appearance. It was from here 
Ruby went on the Broadway stage and about 
the same time became the bride of Al Jolson. 

And Stanwyck. Insisting on getting a break. 
And seeing Tex Guinan about it personally. 

" She didn't have to look coy and sweet," 
Tex confided to me one afternoon in her little 
Eighth Street apartment. "That Stanwyck 
girl always knew what she wanted and how to 
get it. She's got a good head on her shoulders, 
a good clear head that she uses for more than 
a hat rack." 

SO Tex — the maker of Hollywood stars — 
passes on. And with her passing, myriad 
memories of other days are stirred, those early 
struggles for the first chance which every 
picture star in Hollywood today has had to go 
through. Goodbye, Tex. And a happy journey. 



100 



Photoplay Magazine for January, 1934 



IOI 



The Amazing Story 

Behind Garbo's 

Choice of Gilbert 

[ CONTINUED FROM l'AGE 33 ] 



role to him willingly. And today, looking back 
on this strange twist of events, I have no 
bitterness in my heart. Only a great respect 
for Gilbert's accomplishment and a decided 
realization that there must be spiritual har- 
mony between screen lovers if their scenes are 
to be truly convincing." 

Laurence Olivier was too modest to go on 
from there with his story. But it is known that 
Metro called him into their executive offices 
and offered him any other role in any other 
picture he cared to play. They had no fault 
to find with his acting. Olivier's is a polished 
technique, perfected through years of stage 
training and inherited from a long line of 
histrionic ancestors. His first love has always 
been the stage. Jed Harris wired, offering him 
a star role in "The Green Bay Tree," on 
Broadway. Olivier decided to accept it. 

Olivier is making a tremendous hit in the 
play, starring opposite his wife, Jill Esmond. 
Jill's been in pictures, too. Remember her as 
the society girl in "Is My Face Red?" with 
Ric Cortez? A lovely English voice and 
exquisite poise and not at all short on good 
looks. Perhaps that's why Olivier's work in 
the play is so convincing — he's inspired by 
his own wife's beauty and charm. 

And as this is being written I understand 
John Gilbert has done so well for himself in 
"Queen Christina" that he is being talked of 
as possible star in the new musical version of 
"The Merry Widow." 

Maurice Chevalier was signed for this role 
before he left for his vacation in France. And 
Maurice is considerably worried that he, too, 
may be replaced by John Gilbert as was 
Laurence Olivier. Just what Gilbert's future 
in talking pictures will be from now on will be 
an interesting speculation. The strange twist 
fate gave him when he thought he was really 
through. 




He's made many an Englishman 
laugh! And now Nigel Bruce, British 
funnyman, is going to act comical for 
Americans. Bruce has signed with 
Fox for a role in "I Am Suzanne" 



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Phantom Daddies of the Screen 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 29 



"Milton had no special plans for Kenyon." 
Doris said. "He was not particularly ambi- 
tious for him. All he asked was that he develop 
a fine character and become a fine citizen, and 
the rest would take care of itself. I have him 
in public school — he's in the second grade, too, 
at the age of six. He plays with the Barrymore 
children and, oh, he's such a manly little 
man!" 

Some day Kenyon will see the phantom of 
his father on the screen and hear his voice. 
What will his reaction be? Even Doris 
Kenyon would like to know. 

T\ T a neighborhood theater in Hollywood a 
^•year or two ago, a re-issue of an old-time 
racing thriller featuring Wally Reid was pro- 
jected on the screen. There he was. the 
debonair, smiling idol who had been admired 
by millions the world over. The audience saw 
him clamber into a low-hung car and send it 
hurtling around the track, crashing through a 
fence at a turn, spinning end for end, defying 
death and destruction and winning readily by 
the hero's margin, though somewhat worse off 
for the wear. 

The audience applauded wildly, because 
Wally Reid's thrillers were thrillers you couldn't 
forget. Each had its punch. 

Crumpled low in a theater seat this day was 
a lad vainly endeavoring to stifle half-audible 
sobs as the picture unreeled. 

His hair was sandy colored and mussed 
His eyes were blue — a sort of light hazel-blue 
and something about his general appearance 
seemed familiar, 

"Who is he?" a number of persons thought. 
" Don't we know him?" 

When the "thriller" was finished, a kindly 
woman leaned over the boy and asked: 

"What's the matter, son? Why are you 
crying?" 

"That." replied the boy, "that was my 
daddy!" 

William Wallace Reid was the boy. Billy 
Reid, they called him. Billy was slightly more 
than five years old when his illustrious father 
died in 1923. Once — and only once — has he 
run into one of his daddy's pictures unex- 
pectedly. Yet he fears or hesitates to approach 
a picture theater with a view of buying a 
ticket because of the possibility that he may 
again suddenly see before him that happy, sun- 
shine-radiating idol whom the world acclaimed 
— his father, in phantom figure. To this day — 
and Billy is sixteen now — he lives in constant 
dread, or fear, or anticipation. He doesn't 
know which. 

T OCKED in a storage vault, Mrs. Dorothy 
■'-'Davenport Reid, the widow, has prints of 
two pictures that Wally made — "Forever," a 
Peter Ibbetson story, and "Across the Conti- 
nent," a racing production. Ten years they 
have remained there undisturbed. Ten years 
more they may be there, undisturbed. 

"I haven't had the courage to get them out 
and run them," Mrs. Reid explained. "In 
' Forever,' Wally enacts the role of a man who 
goes mad and dies in prison. It's a terrible 
thing to see, and yet one of his masterpieces. I 
couldn't watch it again. Not now. Certainly 
I couldn't exhibit it to Billy or to Betty, our 
adopted daughter. 

" Betty is fourteen. She was only three 
when Wally passed on. She remembers him 
but dimly and has never seen him in motion. 
Her only conception of how he looked and 
acted will come from 'still' pictures and the 
phantom she will see when I get out 'Forever' 
and 'Across the Continent.' 

"I try to impress upon the minds of the two 
children that their father is still near them, 
that he is around and about them. I keep the 



house vitally alive with his pictures. I have 
books and books of them, and Billy and Betty 
sometimes go over them for hours together. 
Wally took Billy out in a racing car once and 
Billy has never forgotten it. To this day he 
has the racing 'bug,' and takes the greatest 
delight in tinkering with and driving a machine. 
He has appeared in one motion picture as a 
race driver and loves it." 

Billy was cast for the role of Carruthers in 
"Tom Brown of Culver," by Universal, but 
Mrs. Reid turned thumbs down upon it, be- 
cause to her it was not truly a Wallace Reid 
characterization. 

Strange, it seems that most of the picture 
stars are fated to make at least one hard- 
boiled production just prior to their death or 
departure from films. Take the case of Fred 




Little Fred Thomson, Jr., is the son 
of Frances Marion, well-known 
scenario writer. She says she will 
never consent to the child's seeing 
his father playing in the role of 
the notorious outlaw, Jesse James 



Thomson, one of the cleanest and most idolized 
of Western stars. Princeton graduate, ex- 
ecutive in the Boy Scouts of America, athlete 
who participated in the Olympic Games in 
Europe, amateur boxer and friend of Gene 
Tunney, an ordained minister, chaplain of the 
143rd Field Artillery in the World War, Fred 
was adored by American youth. When he died 
in 1928, he left a son, Fred Thomson, Jr., two 
years old, his "little pal." Fifth from the last 
picture Fred made was based on the life of 
Jesse James, this country's most notorious 
outlaw! 

Has little Fred, Jr., seen this production? 
Not on your life! Frances Marion, famous 
scenarist, his mother, has kept him scrupu- 
lously from any possibility of his seeing it. The 
production was a terrible "flop," and was 
retired soon after its initial showing. Fred 
Thomson admirers just wouldn't accept him as 
a bank looter, train robber and night-rider. 
They wanted him "clean," or not at all. 

Nevertheless, the menace existed, and there 



was no telling when little Fred would unex- 
pectedly see his daddy as a cold-blooded, ruth- 
less killer. One thing Fred, Jr., does see daily 
to remind him of his daddy is a beautiful white 
horse, Silver King, which Fred rode in all his 
pictures. Silver King is at home, "pensioned," 
of course, for the balance of his life. He will 
never again be seen in films, Frances Marion 
says. 

A NOTHER little "shaver," who for years 
■* *has faced the possibility of seeing his only 
known parent as a phantom, is Donald Mike 
Gallery, who was adopted from an Austin, 
Texas, orphanage by Barbara La Marr. Don 
knew nothing of his real father and mother 
when Barbara, "the too-beautiful girl," espied 
him in a crib and pleaded that she be made his 
foster-mother. Her own baby had died. 

"There's never been one day — not one hour 
— since they took my own little boy out of my 
arms," she cried, "that I haven't longed for the 
feel of a baby against my breast. Lots of 
nights I've waked up thinking I heard that 
little voice that has been still so long, calling 
me. Lots of times, as I opened the door to 
come in, I forgot and looked to see his little 
face." 

The impassioned plea of the glorious Barbara 
was heeded and little Don passed into her keep- 
ing while he still was in his swaddling clothes. 
He was three-and-a-half years old when Miss 
La Marr died at Altadena in 1926, and ZaSu 
Pitts and Tom Gallery adopted him. 

One of the pictures Barbara made, a little 
more than a year before her collapse, was "The 
Shooting of Dan McGrew," a Metro pro- 
duction based on the Robert W. Service poem 
of the same name. Barbara never wanted her 
little Don to see this picture. 

The poem recites a dramatic story of how on 
a night of incredible cold, a miner stumbled 
into the "Malamute saloon." The stranger 
goes to the battered old piano, plays sweet 
music upon it, then suddenly stops with a 
crash. And — 

"I want to state and my words are straight 

and I'll bet my poke they're true, 
That one of you is a hound of hell . . . and 

that one is Dan McGrew. 
Then I ducked my head and the lights went 

out and two guns blazed in the dark, 
And a woman screamed, and the lights 

went up and two men lay stiff and stark. 
Pitched on his head and pumped full of lead 

was Dangerous Dan McGrew, 
While the man from the creeks lay clutched 

to the breast of the lady that's known as 

Lou." 

Barbara, of course, was "the lady that's 
known as Lou." She was insistent that this 
be a chapter from her picture life which should 
be kept from Donald. It was too sordid. It 
carried a wrong impression of her. 

THERE are other children — lots of them — 
in the film colony who see either their dead 
father or mother moving life-like across the 
screen, but most of them have reached the age 
of understanding. There's Creighton Chaney, 
for example, son of the late Lon Chaney, 
greatest of all character actors. One of Creigh- 
ton's most prized possessions is a film showing 
his father making camp by the side of a stream 
away up in the Sierra Madre Mountain range. 
He has films showing his father moving happily 
about a cabin up there where the fishing was 
good. Money couldn't buy these possessions. 
Finally there is little ten year old Stratton 
Nomis, son of one of the greatest aerial stunt- 
ing daredevils that Hollywood ever had. Leo 
Nomis was killed in February of 1932 when, 



102 



Photoplay Magazine for January, 1934 



103 



engaged in a dog-fight with two other will- 
known aviators 1,500 feet up, he put his ship 
into a falling leaf for the kick of the picture. 

But something went wrong and instead of 
coming out of the falling leaf, the ship went 
into a tailspin and crashed. The engine buried 
itself a full eight feet in the ground. 

Little Stratton Nomis could look at that 
terrific air battle and truthfully cry out: 

"There — that was my daddy!" 

The credit, of course, went to the star of the 
picture — and audiences applauded him on all 
the moving picture screens throughout the 
country. But it was Leo Nomis' body that was 
taken to a little evergreen plot in one of Holly- 
wood's cemeteries. 

For that's life — and death — in Hollywood. 



Pinch Hitters That 
Came Through 

[ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 70 ] 



The studio, all agog, sent out an SOS for a 
substitute. 

In Hollywood was a good actor named Ivan 
Lebedeff, a cultured Russian. Once upon a 
time he had played important roles, but in 
recent years his talents had been lost in in- 
significant bits. 

Would he play the part of Harlow's foreign 
lover in her new picture? 

He had been waiting for a break like that for 
a long, long time! 

Lebedeff played the part — and he played it 
well. Once again he is in line tor important 
roles. But if Asther hadn't walked out — Lebe- 
deff's name might have remained hidden and 
obscure, listed at the end of casts. 

Then there was the time Paramount bent 
itself double and all the script writers tore their 
hair trying to keep Miriam Hopkins on the set. 
The picture was "No Man of Her Own." 
Miriam was to co-star with Gable, who was 
borrowed from M-G-M for the picture. 

Work began, and Miriam complained. First, 
the part was too weak, too saccharine. The 
script writers wrote and rewrote, trying to 
strengthen it. Then Miriam decided she was 
being over-shadowed by Gable. 

"pINALLY, Miriam went to lunch one day, 
*■ and didn't come back. She flew to Palm 
Springs. Studio executives phoned and tele- 
graphed. They begged, they pleaded, they 
threatened. 

Then they put Carole Lombard in the role. 

Carole scored a big success. The public liked 
her teamed with the great screen lover. Carole 
had played leads before, but the role that 
Miriam high-hatted greatly increased the Lom- 
bard lady's screen prestige and was an impor- 
tant addition to her list of successes. 

"The Way to Love," with Chevalier and 
Sylvia Sidney, was well in production, when 
Sylvia's throat trouble made it inadvisable for 
her to continue working. Europe seemed the 
best place to recover — so Sylvia sailed. 

The well-known panic was on. Finally dif- 
ficulties all around were solved happily by 
borrowing Ann Dvorak from Warners to play 
the vacated part — and it is the opinion of many 
critics that she was better suited to the char- 
acter than Miss Sidney. 

John Stahl, out at Universal, wanted Irene 
Dunne to play the girl in his "Only Yester- 
day." He wanted her so badly that absolutely 
no one else would do. This great epic was 
Stahl's pride and joy. It had been in prepara- 
tion for months. 

Finally Irene was set for the part — and then 
salary trouble set in. The proceedings were de- 
layed for so long that it was time for Irene to 
make a much-anticipated visit to Xew York to 
see her husband, and she refused to put it off. 

Things were in a terrible tangle. Ten leading 



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baby's-" 




Don't dilly-dally another minute, 
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So start your Ivory beauty treat- 
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skin silky-smooth. 

Ivory, you know, is so pure that 
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safest for your own complexion. 



And . . . stay far, far away from 
"beauty soaps" that may hide im- 
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And be a baby about your bath, 
too! Hot, dry rooms — raw, chilly 
winds! These days, your skin all 
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io 4 



Photoplay Magazine for January, 1934 



leashes 



WERE MEANT TO BE 



X^urlyl 




NO HEAT 
NO COSMETICS 
NO PRACTICING 



No one knows why that long, upward 
sweep of feminine lashes has always 
seemed so enchanting to the masculine 
mind — but it's so. And it used to be that 
(like curly hair) a girl either was born 
with the right kind or else — . Now there's 
a gadget: Kurlash. Slip your lashes in, 
and press the handles. That's all. Kur- 
lash won't break the lashes or hurt them 
in any way. In fact, it's used by a great 
man}' movie stars. If it isn't at your 
favorite department store, drug store or 
beauty shop, send $1 with the coupon. 
And after you've curled your lashes, you'll 
probably want to take other steps too. 



Kurlene: keeps your 
lashes and brows in con- 
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Shadette: gives mys- 
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four shades, brown, blue, 
green, violet. $1. 



Lashtint: darkens your 
lashes; waterproof. $1. 

LashpaC: compact mas- 
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Tweezette: to arch 
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r^urlash 



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Gentlemen: Here's one dollar. Please send Kurlash 
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In Canada, Kurlash Company of Canada, Toronto. 



Name- 



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Slate- 



young actresses were tested for the part. 
Finally, in desperation, Stahl went to New 
\ ork. There he saw an unknown actress play- 
ing a small part in the current Broadway suc- 
cess "Dinner at Eight." 

Those "in the know" say Margaret Sullavan 
has had the most magnificent chance at star- 
dom in the history of Hollywood handed to her 
on a silver platter. 

She is something fresh and new and entirely 
herself — with a great picture and an un- 
paralleled opportunity to prove it. 

But if Irene Dunne had not been a unique 
Hollywood wife, who preferred going to New 
York to see her husband to staying in Holly- 
wood and playing the sort of a part every 
actress prays for — would anyone have heard of 
Margaret Sullavan? 

CALLY FILERS made her debut on the Fox 
kw, lot, replacing Virginia Cherrill in a George 
O'Brien Western. Virginia sprained her ankle 
— Sally was more or less retired from the screen 
then and spending most of her time out on 
Hoot Gibson's ranch. But she could ride a 



horse — and somebody mentioned her as a 
candidate for the part. 

It didn't seem very important at the time 
but it led directly to Sally's great opportunity 
in "Bad Girl," on the same lot. 

AND now, what has Sally done but turned 
down "Jimmy and Sally" which was 
written for herself and Jimmy Dunn! 

Ee-magine! With that title all set and every- 
thing! She is newly married to Harry Joe 
Brown and doesn't care about being " teamed " 
with any other man — even in a picture. And 
anyway, she didn't like the story. 

So a lady who has been languishing in West- 
erns — even as Sally was herself, before her big 
chance — gets the lead opposite Jimmy. Her 
name is Claire Trevor, and she is one of the 
loveliest blondes in pictures. 

Will this part lead to a "Bad Girl" for 
Claire? 

They'll tell you in Hollywood it's all in the 
"breaks" you get. But often as not, it's in the 
breaks and sprains, tonsils and temperaments 
somebody else gets, too! 



Merry Ex- Wives of Hollywood 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 51 



than I can — " Carole broke down and 
sobbed. 

"Haven't you hid yet?" Mary Carlisle 
called from under the davenport. 

A quiet, dignified little blonde arose from 
her seat in the corner. 

"It's Mary Pickford," the whispers ran. 

"Who iss Mary Pickford?" asked Dietrich, 
fingering her necktie. 

"Listen," hissed Polly Moran, "if you 
weren't so darned shorts conscious, you'd 
know." 

"f^IRLS," said Mary simply, "you all know 
^--*of my recent grief, so I'll say just this. 
Never marry a leaper. They leap from chande- 
lier to chandelier. From continent to con- 
tinent. They even ride bareback on carpets. 
So please " 

She couldn't go on. 

Crawford, in her Adrian special number 123, 
arose and look around pleadingly. 

" Dodo and I were like two children at first," 
she said, giving it a little of scene four from 
"Possessed." 

"But, girls, I warn you, Douglas, as I had to 
call him when he grew up, won't remain a 
child. He'll go artistic on you. He'll want 
to paint. He'll want to sculpt. He'll want to 
wade knee-deep in Nietzsche. He'll want to 
write. And even will. He'll want to act " 

"And will, all over the place," interrupted 
Bennett. 

"He'll yearn to write poetry. And give 
imitations." 

"God forbid," moaned the girls, while Joan 
went on: 

"So, I went from 'hey, nonny, nonny' to 
the poet's corner in six short months. With 
gardenias, of course. But my soul is 
crushed. Our souls are no longer kindred. He 
went his way and I went to the Cocoanut 
Grove with Franchot Tone." 

"What did you wear?" the eager audience 
thundered. 

"It was a little blue number I had my de- 
signer send out. It had the new Mae West 
shoulderline in " 

"Who iss Mae West?" hissed Dietrich. 

The company ignored her. 

"Well, guh-irls," wavered ZaSu Pitts, lifting 
her prostrate hands and turning her large, sad 

eyes on the gathering, "wellll 1 oh, 

dear " in a flurry of embarrassment she 

started slowly back to her chair. 

"Oh, ZaSu!" the girls objected. "Come 
on!" 

ZaSu began again, "Well, Tom and I — er, 



Tom Gallery his name was — and still is, I 
guess — Well, Tom and I were very happy — 
but I want to warn you girls that Tom al- 
ways wants to go to prize-fights. 

"I used to say to Tom, I'd say, 'Tom, why 
do you always have to go tearing out to prize- 
fights? Why couldn't we have a nice private 
prize-fight here at home?' But no," ZaSu 
sighed, "he always wanted to see two com- 
plete stranger^ punch each other in the — well, 
punch each other. He wouldn't pick a prize- 
fight at home, and I — well, that's his only 
fault girls — " 

And, lifting her hands in a futile little 
gesture, ZaSu sank into her chair. 

Sally Eilers stepped to the front of the room. 
"I'm here to say this. Hoot Gibson is a 
square shooter." 

"Ride 'em, cowboy," chorused the girls. 

"Oh, are we playing cowboy and Indian?" 
came from little Carlisle under the davenport. 

"But the trouble was," continued Sally, 
"I wanted to throw parties, and Hoot wanted 
to throw bulls. So girls, I warn you, you'll 
ride horseback when you want to ride in a 
limousine. Why, it got so, every time I 
started an emotional scene in a picture with 
Jimmie Dunn, I broke into a canter. I grew 
canter-minded. I even cantered when the 
horse trotted. I — " Sally wept and dropped 
into her saddle. 

THERE was a sudden commotion in the 
doorway. Gracie Allen, breathless and 
flurried, rode in on her bicycle. 

"Oh, girls, I'm late but I got into the wrong 
meeting. And, mind you, I never knew it for 
hours. Isn't that silly? I mean I kept telling 
them all about George's funny little habits. 
They liked the one about George riding up 
and down in elevators when there are no 
elevators," Gracie giggled. "I told that one 
about twenty times. Even in our living-room, 
I mean, George keeps going up in elevators all 
evening. He says he does it to keep from 
mayhem. 

"And the funny part of it is there's never 
been anyone in our family called Mayhem. 
He only imagines it. It's silly, don't you 
think so?" 

"Yes, we think so, Gracie," they said. 
"But what meeting was it?" 

" Well, after two hours they came and patted 
me on the head and said they were convinced 
I was in the right place, only George should be 
there instead of me. Sillies. They said they 
were The Society for the Prevention of 
Cruelty to Animals." 



Photoplay Magazine i-or January, 1934 



"Wait," Bennett peered intently down the 
boulevard. "Girls," she screamed, "here 
comes Gary Cooper." 

There was a mad dash for the door. Three 
stars were trampled unconscious in the rush 
as the entire meeting tore down the boulevard 
after Gary. Screaming and yelling, "Yoo 
hoo, Gary, wait for us." 

"Gee, are we playing 'Run, sheep, run'?'' 
came from little Mary Carlisle under the 
davenport. But no one answered. The pack 
was in full chase. 



A Pair of 
Wuppermanns 

[ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 54 ] 

So he found his way back to New York and, 
having nothing to do, began to look for a job 
on the stage. After all, wasn't Ralph on the 
stage? 

And finding the job, he too — in order not to 
disgrace the name of Wuppermann — called 
himself Morgan. 

Frank's pride smarted now when the intro- 
ductions at the Lambs Club continued to be, 
"I want you to meet Ralph Morgan's brother." 
He would add crossly, "The name is Frank, if 
you please." But nobody paid much atten- 
tion. 

Then, before long, Frank went to Holly- 
wood to make a name for himself. 

For awhile, everything was all right. Frank 
was Frank in Hollywood. He wasn't any- 
body's brother. And Ralph continued to be 
an important identity with a name of his 
own on Broadway. 

And everything would have continued 
smoothly — without any confusion or em- 
barrassing mix-ups — if Ralph had stayed in 
New York. But his stage reputation made 
him highly desirable to movie producers, and 
eventually he, too, answered the call of the 
screen. When Ralph got to Hollywood, the 
Morgan trouble began. 

PRYSTK was called Ralph, and Ralph was 
*- called Frank and the confusion was, and still 
is, exceedingly disconcerting. It is possible 
that the younger Wuppermann even yearned 
for the good old days when he was definitely in- 
troduced and recognized as "Ralph's brother." 
At least, people knew he wasn't Ralph! 

Take, for example, the day Frank met a 
Fox studio executive at Agua Caliente. 
Frank's contract is with M-G-M; Ralph is with 
Fox. But when Frank went back to his table, 
the Fox executive said to his companion: 

"What is his name?" 

"Frank Morgan," was the answer. 

"Oh yes, of course, he's working with us." 
the executive dismissed the matter — and 
probably ever after had the two actors con- 
fused. 

Recently a picture of Claudia Morgan and 
her father, Ralph Morgan, appeared in a 
magazine. But caption beneath the picture 
read, "Frank Morgan and Daughter." Frank 
has a seventeen-year-old son. No daughter. 

Another magazine — referring to the lawyer 
in "The Kiss Before the Mirror" — called 
him Ralph Morgan. But he was Frank! 

More recently still, the following paragraph 
was printed in the "low-down" column of a 
film paper: "Brotherly love moved Ralph 
Morgan to call this here newspaper yesterday 
and tell us that it was he, and not frere Frank, 
who did the acting in 'Walls of Gold.' We 
were already chagrined by the mistake in the 
review of the film, in mentioning the wrong 
Morgan as having appeared in it. Or is there 
a wrong Morgan? We don't think so!" 

Incidentally, it was probably not the fact 
that Ralph felt himself being slighted which 
prompted him to telephone that paper and 
make the correction. More than likely he 







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Photoplay Magazine for January, 1934 



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;«:«:o::o::<>::«:o::o::«:<>::<5^ 



sensed what brother Frank's reaction would 
be at having his name linked with a second- 
rate picture. 

For, oddly and ironically, in Hollywood the 
tables have been turned for the Wuppermann 
boys. Frank, who played small bits on the 
stage while his brother was matinee idol of 
Broadway, has been getting the fat, juicy 
roles on the screen And Ralph, the stage 
success, has had many ineffectual and rather 
unimportant parts. 

Frank, you will remember, was handed one 
conspicuously plump role after another: 
With Lupe Velez in "The Half-Naked Truth." 
With Alice Brady in "Broadway to Holly- 
wood." With Jean Harlow in "The Blonde 
Bombshell." The role of the philandering 
publisher, with Ann Harding and Myrna 
Loy in "When Ladies Meet." 

/"^N the other hand, Ralph's parts have not 
^'been strong — even when the film was im- 
portant. Take, for example, the sad-faced in- 
effectual L'zar in "Rasputin and the Empress," 
and the pathetic Uncle Charlie in "Strange 
Interlude." Fortunately, Ralph's Hollywood 
breaks are getting better — with his stronger 
roles in "The Rower and the Glory" and 
"7 Lives Were Changed." 

But what are the two brothers' attitudes 
toward their movie careers and the con- 
fusing mix-ups which have embarrassed them 
since Ralph's arrival in Hollywood? 

Not so long ago it was rumored that Frank 
asked a writer not to mention Ralph in the 
same story with him. He intimated that 
there was so much confusion already about 
their identity, that linking their names to- 
gether would just mess matters up a little 
more. 

When Ralph suggested that the best way 
to combat the "mistaken identity" difficulty 
was for both of them to appear in the same 
picture sometime, Frank was silent. Again, 
when the brothers were advised to hire the 
same agent to handle their business affairs, 
Frank was not interested. 

People who know the men well do not 
confuse them. 

For one thing, they move in very different 
social groups. The Frank Morgans go with a 
gayer crowd. The Ralph Morgans have made 
their Hollywood friendships among more quiet 
people. 

But while scandal-mongers might like to 
establish a rift between the families and say 
the two brothers are not compatible, it is 
probably pure gossip. 

For Frank still remembers that it was his 
older brother who bore the brunt of family 
wrath and paved the way for his entrance into 
the theater. 

And Ralph is too sincere an artist, too secure 
in his Broadway reputation, to be jealous of 
his brother who, so far, has picked up fatter 
movie plums. 

TF you ask their sister, Mrs. Langdon, what 
*-she thinks, she will champion Ralph. 

" Frank may be the showier actor," she says. 
"I believe there's no doubt about that. He 
was gifted by the gods with a natural versa- 
tility. 

"Perhaps Ralph, though, in his quieter, more 
thoughtful way, gives greater study to each 
role he plays. 

" I always remember what one of his dramatic 
professors said to me: 'Ralph studies his roles 
more thoroughly and plays them more per- 
fectly then any student I've ever had. He 
puts all of himself into every gesture, into every 
word. Consequently, his interpretations have 
delicate nuances and surprising expressions 
that are never to be found in the playing of an 
actor who might be a more natural showman.' 
That's the difference I believe, between 
Ralph's and Frank's work. But each is 
splendid in his own way. 

"And," she added, "I think it would be 
very difficult for a critic to say which is the 
better actor." 






Photoplay Magazine for January, 1934 



107 



Twenty Years After 



[ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 30 ' 



told B. P. Schulberg, the producer, that. "I 
want to be Fredric March," I said. 

"B.P." sneaked a puzzled glance at the con- 
tract. 

"It's down here in black and white that you 
are Fredric March," he said. 

"What I mean," I explained, "is that I 
don't want to play Barrymore. I want to play 
myself." 

"Of course you want to play yourself," B.P. 
soothed. " Your first picture will be 'The 
Dummy.' " 

I was pretty sore, until I discovered that I 
wasn't playing the title role. 

After I'd been around awhile, people got 
tired of telling each other of whom I reminded 
them, and by and by some gagman said didn't 
John Barrymore look like Fredric March. 
But by that time I'd already resigned myself 
to the fact that a person sometimes does look 
like someone else, and that as long as an actor 
can keep from looking like the wrath of God 
he has an even break. 

A >f Y first few years didn't bring me any parts 
•*• *-*-over which I could get excited. I was get- 
ting pretty much of a routine build-up. But 
the parts I got I threw my heart and soul into. 
I remember throwing them into " Night Angel " 
and, for a while, thinking I'd never get them 
back. I grew a beard for my part — a young 
Central European lawyer. And what did I 
get for it? 

In the first place, I got insults. The picture 
was to be made in New York, and I had a 
short vacation before it was to start, so Mrs. 
March and I went on a cruise to the West 
Indies and I started the whiskers. 

By the time we got to Bermuda, people were 
looking at the stubble and wagging their heads 
and saying, "That's the tropics for you — a 
man soon loses his morale. I'll bet he doesn't 
even wash." 

Then, after I'd braved their calumny and 
arrived back in New York with a really magni- 



ficent growth, Eddie Goulding, the director, 
didn't like it. 

But I was stubborn about shaving it off. 
Each day I'd trim off a little here and a little 
there, and ask him how he liked it now. When 
I got down to just a dot on the chin, he 
gave in and said I could wear that if Walter 
Wanger, the producer, liked it. But Walter 
took one look at it and said I looked more 
like a doctor than a lawyer. I slunk out of 
his office swearing that I was through suffering 
for my art. 

That's all I knew about it! 

Shortly after, I met Mr. Jesse Lasky at a 
conference in New York and casually suggested 
that I'd like to do either "Peter Ibbetson" or 
"Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde," both of which 
Paramount owned. I wanted particularly to 
do "Jekyll and Hyde" because I thought it 
would give me a swell chance to make 
faces. 

Well, we did it. But I didn't get my chance to 
make faces. Instead, I just supplied the head, 
and the make-up man made the faces on it. 
For about a month, I got to the studio at six 
in the morning and Wally Westmore spent 
three or four hours building additions to my 
cheek-bones and ears and putting fangs into 
my mouth and stuffing things up my nose. 

These early morning frivolities almost killed 
me, but the Academy of Motion Picture Arts 
and Sciences awarded me a gold statuette for 
the best male performance of the year 1932 
because of "Jekyll and Hyde," and I was will- 
ing to call it square. 

My trophy was the turning point of my life. 
"What," I asked Mrs. March — whom I very 
often call "Florence" or "Darling" — "what is 
a gold statuette without a marble fawn to go 
with it?" 

"And what," countered Darling, or Florence, 
or Mrs. March, "is a marble fawn without a 
lawn to put it on; and a lawn without a house; 
and a house without a baby?" 

I didn't attempt to answer the obvious. 





She smiled for the camera, but wouldn't speak to reporters who asked 
if she and Director Mervyn LeRoy were already married. Whatever 
their status, Doris, daughter of Harry Warner, and Mervyn look happy 



CERTAINLY FUSSY!" 

They re proud to announce that "my 
wife baked this cake herself" — but 
they dont like our hands to look it. 
They forget that ten fingers are our 
hardest-working tools . . . and only 
remember that the hands they held 
when we said "I do" were soft and 
smooth and white . . . 

WELL, thanks to Frostilla 
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Photoplay Magazine for January, 1934 

"Well," I said, "We have a baby. You re- 
member, don't you?" 

"I remember perfectly," she groaned, "on 
account of it's the nurse's day out, and at the 
moment it looks as if I'd have to give Penny 
her orange juice as a hypodermic." 

"Orange juice or no orange juice," I said, 
getting back to our original discussion, "that 
leaves us a house and a marble fawn to go. 
We'll draw some plans for a house. Tonight — ■ 
I have to go to the studio now. We're making 
'The Sign of the Cross.' " 

"I'm the one who should be making the 
sign of the cross," sighed Mrs. March, starting 
upstairs with the orange juice. 

We never got around to drawing our house 
plans ourselves. Not that we hadn't the talent, 
but we only had one pencil and we needed that 
for contract scoring. Rather than buv another, 
we hired an architect. 

"We're going to build out here," we told 
people. 

At first they only raised their eyebrows, as 



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niuch as to say that we were chumps to build 
in Beverly Hills when everyone knew that 
Westport, Connecticut, was the place where all 
good little actors go when they retire, and it 
was only a question of time now. But when 
they saw we couldn't be swayed, they were 
very nice about it and would always ask: 
"How's the house coming?" And we'd have 
to admit that it wasn't even started yet, be- 
cause we couldn't decide whether we wanted a 
fireplace in the bedroom and didn't know where 
we could put the bath if we did. 

TQ UT we Marches always get what we go after 
•^and we finally figured out that if we put a 
shower in the bedroom fireplace, our problem 
would be solved. So now we're ready to start. 
By next spring we'll have the house. And by 
next summer our house will have a lawn. And 
I've already taken an option on a marble 
fawn. 

So, after all, I guess I'll have something to 
show for my first five years in the movies. 



The Clown Who Juggled Apples 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 60 



hours, I found my father sitting in the kitchen, 
as all people who lived in suburbs sat in kitchens 
in those days. Only highbrows ever used the 
front door of a house." 

Bill overlooked one thing. His father was 
like Tarn O'Shanter's wife, nursing his wrath 
to keep it warm. He chased Bill again, and the 
boy decided it was best to remain away. 

He slept in a cave that night, used by chil- 
dren of the neighborhood for daytime play. 

Xow began a weird experience for the boy. 
He did not return home for several years, but 
lived as best he could in the city. For many 
months he lived in the cave, his playmates 
bringing him food. 

Before he was out of his teens he worked for 
two summers as a helper on an ice wagon. "It 
was a nice easy job," said Bill, with a touch of 
remembered bitterness. "I only had to get up 
at three in the morning and lug heavy cakes of 
ice on my back till five in the afternoon." 

When out of work, which was often, he slept 
where he could — "Where the wind could not 
reach me. The wind was my greatest menace." 

Strange are the furbelows of destiny. Once, 
the vagabond boy picked up several apples in 
front of a grocery store. He had been wander- 
ing along the street, wondering what his future 
was to be, and where he would eat that night. 

He had seen jugglers in a cheap theater. He 
tried to juggle the apples, and found, to his 
surprise, that he kept the three moving success- 
fully for several minutes. 

Exalted, he went juggling down the street 
with the grocer's apples. Surely if the mer- 
chant but knew of the destiny to which the 
young alley boy juggled, he would forgive the 
loss of the apples. 

He practiced juggling for three years, with 
whatever came to hand. As an indifferent 
young juggler he earned a meager living for a 
few years. He had a strong mind, and knew, a 
rare thing among youths, exactly what he 
wanted to do. 

SINCE time immemorial such people as Bill 
Fields, with gypsy hearts, have won high 
laurels from the starving beginnings of wander- 
ing players — Deburau, the French clown, 
greater than Chaplin; Rachel, born of gypsy 
Jews at a roadside inn; Nell Gwynne, and 
many others. 

By some peculiar alchemy of the senses, they 
absorb suffering in youth and turn it later to 
sad and ironical humor. Never is a clown a 
fool. Iiarly they discover without knowing 
anything of Nietzsche, that men should learn 
to laugh at themselves. 

Bill Fields is no exception. Beneath his ex- 



cellent drollery, he laughs as often at people as 
with them. 

When it came time for him to travel beyond 
Philadelphia, he gave a benefit performance at, 
of all places, Batly Hall. All the performers 
worked for nothing, except the young juggler, 
Fields. The benefit was for him. With the 
ninety-three dollars obtained, he bought some 
new clothes, and went to Plymouth Park, 
Penna., at a salary of five dollars per week — 
one week. The people were kind, however, and 
recommended him for an engagement at At- 
lantic City. 

"Fired again," thought Bill often and long. 
On the way to Atlantic City a great buffoon 
was born. 

"L_TE was paid ten dollars per week as long as 
•*- -Mie could draw. He did every thing about the 
place. One stunt which came from his active 
brain was to swim far out in the ocean. Once 
there, he would flounder and yell for help. The 
life guards, who worked in shows nearby, would 
rescue him. They would rush him to a pavilion, 
where a crowd would gather. Then the waiters 
would start yelling their wares for sale. 

The apple juggler was soon on his way to a 
burlesque show at eighteen dollars per week, 
which he received — some weeks. When Bill 
would ask for a dollar the manager would 
shriek, "Do you think I'm made of money? If 
I had a dollar I'd start a No. 2 Company." 

Stranded at last for keeps in Kent, Ohio, Bill 
had twelve dollars. The fare to New York was 
eighteen dollars. 

The ancient ticket agent— and may the wind 
blow gently over his grave — trusted him for the 
other six dollars. The son of the gentleman who 
stepped on the rake had no money for food or 
other such details. But New York, the magical, 
was at the other end of the line, and the woe- 
iie juggler of stolen apples was on a warm 
tr; in in the dead of winter. 

fields later played in Akron, Ohio, twelve 
miles from Kent. The agent was given one 
hundred dollars for the badly needed six 
dollars. 

The kindly clown asked me not to write 
about this. I would not, except — there are 
those who say that stage people never re- 
member. 

Fields arrived in New York, and sold his 
overcoat for food. An actor, poor as himself, 
gave him a raincoat. There were only two 
difficulties: it was three below zero and the 
raincoat was many sizes too small for him. 
The proud buffoon carried the coat over his arm. 

Next, the hardly believable happened. He 
got a job with a burlesque show at thirty-five 



Photoplay Magazine for January, 1934 



dollars a week. And the money was paid every 
week! By the time he was twenty, he had 
toured the country in vaudeville, and shortly 
afterward had been booked in Berlin, Germany, 
at one hundred and fifty dollars per week. 

THE vagabond boy went from there to all the 
capitals of Europe in the next two years. 
Another stroke of bad early fortune was to help 
him. He had no money in the days of his 
hunger to buy that which he wanted — an ex- 
pensive juggling outfit, tassels, tights and 
spangles. Instead, he contrived a tramp make- 
up. Who that has seen him, will ever forget his 
inept groping about the stage, his capacity, 
born of fear, to do everything wrong. Here was 
the great clown — blending laughter and tears, 
until the audience, confused, as in real life, 
knew not whether to pity or to laugh at him. 

Another shrewd observation was made by 
the former cash boy. 

Pantomimecouldbe understood in anycoun- 
try. He never deviated therefrom. 

For the next thirteen years his time was 
divided between Europe and America, with in- 
tervening journeys to Australia, the Orient, 
and around the world. 

While on his way to India, the German 
raider, Emden, chased his ship to Australia. 
There he found a cablegram from Charles Dill- 
ingham offering him work in New York in 
"Watch Your Step," with Frank Tinney. The 
trip home required thirty-nine days. Next we 
find him with Ziegfeld's Follies, where he re- 
mained nine years. 

Then he was engaged for a film called " Janice 
Meredith." 



After a year with Paramount, he returned to 
the stage. But the lure of the films and Cali- 
fornia had touched him. 

He had saved his money for years. It was a 
large sum with which to face the evening ot life. 
His stage earnings had been many thousands a 
week. 

He placed the money in a large New York 
bank and decided to "play with films." 

The bank failed. Fields had lost everything 
but courage and tenacity. He wanted to enter 
films, and begin life over again. Alas, the pro- 
ducers did not seem to want him. He offered 
to write, direct and act in a comedy for nothing 
— to get a chance. There were no ears to hear. 

He finally got two unimportant roles. Then 
Mack Sennett at last took him on. He wrote, 
directed and acted in four comedies. All were 
successful. One paid for itself in three days. 

Fields has always believed that a comedian 
should do that which he is "mpelled to do on 
stage or screen, and trust that the audience 
would be impelled to like that which he had 
done. 

His faith in himself has been justified. 

He is now at work in his seventeenth film, 
and under contract to Paramount; the com- 
pany is building him for stardom. 

[" IKE the apples which he juggled from the 
■'-'grocer's, he has long since grown mellow. 

Not only is Bill Fields a great clown, but a 
gentle, tolerant man, who laughs to keep from 
crying. 

And may it be said in conclusion, that he was 
the solace in the old age of the gentleman who 
stepped upon the rake. 



IO9 



The Shadow Staae 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 59 ] 



THE VINEGAR TREE—M-G-M 

A LICE BRADY as a fluttery " Mrs. Mala- 
■**-prop" and Lionel Barrymore as her crusty 
husband, try to keep daughter Mary Carlisle 
from marrying suave, middle-aged Conway 
Tearle. The chatter is bright and amusing, 
and Mary proves herself well able to carry a 
role in company with the veteran cast. 



BEFORE DAWN—RKO-Radio 

HTHIS one will really give you goose-flesh and 
-*- cold chills. Dorothy Wilson, a spiritualist 
medium, tries to help Stuart Erwin, a young 
police detective, solve a murder by going into 
trances. The scene of the action is an old 
haunted house, and no detail which might give 
you another shiver-up-the-spine is omitted. 
Too scary for children. 

THE INVISIBLE MAN— Universal 

XTOW you see him, now you don't — which is 
•*-^good for some shivers in this pseudo-scien- 
tific H. G. Wells tale, hardly as effective on the 
screen as in print. Claude Rains (a screen 
newcomer) makes himself invisible, but in the 
process loses his reason. Imagine what an in- 
visible maniac could do and then multiply by 
ten. Result — some strong horror. But not up 
to "Frankenstein." 

BLOOD MONEY— 
20th Century-United Artists 

(GEORGE BANCROFT'S followers will wel- 
^—*come his screen return in this unpretentious 
but hearty tale of a big shot bail bondsman 
who turns on the underworld which made him, 
when society girl Frances Dee lures him in 
order to gratify her criminality complex. Lots 
of suspense and good characterizations by Ban- 
' croft, Judith Anderson and Frances Dee. 



OLSEN'S BIG MOMENT— Fox 

A DD matchmaking and the care of an in- 
•*Moxicated suicidal bridegroom to being a 
janitor and that's El Brendel's amusing plight. 
Walter Catlett as Robert Brewster, III, fiance 
of Barbara Weeks, gets involved with a gun- 
man's sister, and faces a sawed-off-shotgun 
wedding at four o'clock and a society ditto at 
five. Catlett is riotous. 



HELL AND HIGH WATER— 
Paramount 

T~NICK ARLEN gives a starring performance 
-*— 'in this picture, which unfortunately fails to 
justify it. He plays Cap'n Jericho, the gruff 
but lovable owner of an old garbage scow, who 
falls heir to a baby — also a girl, Judith xMlen, 
when she tries suicide and lands in his nets. 
It could have clicked but didn't. 



MY LIPS BETRAY— Fox 

T ILIAN HARVEY in a musical comedy 
-'-'kingdom, is a poor, would-be cafe singer who 
wins the attention and later the love of the 
romantic young king (John Boles) through an 
escapade of his chauffeur (El Brendel). John is 
smooth and Lilian is charming; but she works 
too hard to save a comedy which was badly 
handled. Only mildly pleasing. 



DANCE, GIRL, DANCE— Invincible 

PVALYN KNAPP splits with her worthless 
-'—'vaudeville partner-husband, Edward Nu- 
gent, becomes a star in Alan Dinehart's night 
club, then cold-shoulders Dinehart and returns 
to Nugent. Evalyn has a hard time with her 
song numbers, leaving musical honors to Ada 
May. Unpretentious, but entertaining. 



JEAN HARLOW, co-starring with LEE TRACY 

in m-g-m' s" Bombshell" 



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Sechet~c{ Qftj\c.ctTcrn ? 

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Photoplay Magazine for January, 1934 



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RIDER OF JUSTICE— Universal 

•"THE same old story — they didn't even 
•*■ change the horses, this trip. Ken Maynard 
is the disappearing nephew who shows up with 
a badge in time to save the pretty girl's ranch. 
So implausible that even the kids objected. 
The scenery will save you the fare to Arizona, 
if you like scenery. 



QUATORZE JUILLET ("July 14")— 
Protex Pictures 

"D OMANCE grows from the depths of Paris 
-*■ ^-when a taxi driver and a neighbor girl cele- 
brate the French national holiday. Those 
knowing French will appreciate the humor of 
the lines and Rene Clair's subtle direction; for 
the rest of us, it's slow, mild entertainment, 
although some of the fun can be understood in 
any language. 



LONE COWBOY— Paramount 

JACKIE COOPER is all this one can offer, for 
J Will James' Western emerges from its screen 
wash wrung pretty dry. Not even the usual 
action and scenery aid the very evident story 
about orphan Jackie sent West to his dead 
father's pal, who is embittered by Lila Lee's 
faithlessness. Of course, Jackie regenerates the 
grouch. 



SPECIAL 1NVESTIGATOR- 
Universal 



•"THE trouble with this mystery story is that 
■*■ it's too mystifying to make much sense to 
the audience. A number of suspects are 
rounded up after a murder, among them Ons- 
low Stevens and Wynne Gibson. Things look 
bad for Onslow until Wynne has a brainstorm 
and saves the day. A good cast, including Alan 
Dinehart and Warren Hymer. 



DER SOHN DER WEISSEN BERGE 

(THE SON OF THE WHITE 

MOUNTAINS)— Itala Film 

A GERMAN-MADE film with Luis Trenker 
■*■ *• as the skiing hero, who upholds com- 
munity honor despite complications arising 
from love and a false murder charge. Trenker 
and the cast do well; but the majestic beauty 
of the Alps steals the picture. 

POLICE CAR 17— Columbia 

CTOCK melodrama, woodenly acted, with 
^Tim McCoy and Evalyn Knapp presiding. 
She's the daughter of a police lieutenant, in- 
jured in capturing a notorious criminal; Tim 
McCoy is on a radio squad car. The criminal 
escapes prison, gets after papa; noble Tim gets 
a hunch that puts him on the trail; and so on. 



Star News from London 



CONTINUED PROM PAGE 77 ] 



When I asked her why she had done such an 
unbelievable thing, she grinned. 

"Because I want experience," she replied. 
"I want to be a big hit over here first. I don't 
want to be 'Made in Hollywood.' I'm going 
out there only after I've really made good 
here!" 

It really begins to look as if the yessing of 
the Hollywood big shots has ceased being uni- 
versal. 

"T)ON ALVARADO and Raquel Torres are 
-*— lovers again — screen, of course. The last 
time it happened was when they played 
opposite one another in "The Bridge of San 
Luis Rey." 

Now Alvarado is Raquel's gypsy lover in 
"The Red Wagon," a British International 
film starring Charles Bickford. 

When Alvarado arrived at Plymouth the im- 
migration authorities wouldn't let him land — 
his passport lacking a British visa. Anyhow, 
they remembered when last year he appeared 
at Southampton with Marilyn Miller — both of 
them without even a passport. On that 
occasion, as you doubtless recall, they had 
boarded the Bremen in New York to bid Mrs. 
Alan Dwan bon voyage — only to be carried 
away in the ship. 

The British International people got busy 
and within a few days obtained the necessary 
permit for Alvarado to come on from Paris and 
go to work. 

A T luncheon with H. B. Warner at the 
-'■■Berkeley another day, we had a grand time 
talking about Hollywood. 

He's been making a talkie version of 
"Sorrell and Son." 

You'll recall he did a silent of this several 
years ago. 

Warner told me the thing that impressed 
him most upon his return to this, his native 
land, was the marvelous memory with which 
all English servants are blessed. Waiters and 
doormen who haven't seen him for countless 
years all address him by name — and tickle him 
pink by doing it. 

Also the tiny size of this little isle affects him 



strangely — after the vast distances of the 
United States. 

"It reminds me," he said, "of the English- 
man who set out from New York to go to San 
Francisco. 

"When, after four days in the train, he 
arrived he found the town all decorated and 
illuminated. It was evident some celebration 
was in progress. 

" 'What's the occasion?' he inquired. 

" 'It's Columbus Day,' somebody told him. 
' Columbus is the guy that discovered America, 
you know.' 

"'Discovered it?' echoed the Englishman. 
'I don't see how he could possibly have missed 
it!'" 

Warner will soon be back in Hollywood. 
He's keen as mustard to find out how his fellow 
English actors are getting on with their cricket. 

ANNA MAY WONG tells me she adores 
■* ^-London and says she hopes to be able to 
settle down here permanently. 

She has made not a few films at Elstree 
where they think the world of her. So far as 
engagements are concerned there is no question 
about her being able to stay in London from 
now on. 

A ND here's the latest Charlie Bickford 
-**-crack : 

"The Red Wagon," being a circus story, has 
a sequence in which two lions are used. The 
day they were shooting this sequence the 
beasts were evidently out of sorts. 

In spite of everything their trainer could do 
to quiet them they persisted in growling and 
snarling. Of course, it was out of the question 
to try to record dialogue against such an 
uproar. 

When, finally, the director decided there was 
nothing left to do but call off work for the day 
— Bickford took command of the situation. 

"I'll fix 'em," he announced. 

Then scowling savagely, he strode up to the 
cage and — arms akimbo and eyes blazing — he 
faced the growling animals. 

"Shut up!" he yelled. "SHUT UP!'' 

And, believe it or not, those beasts shut up! 



Photoplay Magazine for January, 1934 



I I I 



Brief Reviews of Current Pictures 



[ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 17 ] 



TILLIE AND GUS— Paramount.— Even W. C. 
Fields and Alison Skipworth couldn't make much of 
this would-be comedy. (Dec.) 

TO THE LAST MAN— Paramount. — Randolph 
Scott and Esther Ralston, as representatives of 
feuding ex-Kentucky families, lend welcome plot 
variety to this good Western. (Dec.) 

TOMORROW AT SEVEN — RKO-Radio — 

Snappy melodrama, with Chester Morris uncovering 
a villain who kills on time to the dot. Vivienne Os- 
borne. (July) 

•TOO MUCH HARMONY — Paramount— A 
zippy musical enriched by Jack Oakie, Bing 
Crosby, many other A-l laugh-getters. A riot of fun. 
( Nov.) 

TORCH SINGER— Paramount.— Claudette Col- 
bert is an unmarried mother who succeeds as a singer. 
Her songs are fine; Baby LeRoy. (Nov.) 



TRAIL DRIVE, THE— Universal.— An 
able Western with Ken Maynard. (Oct.) 



accept- 



* TUGBOAT ANNIE— M-G-M — Marie Dres- 
sier and Wally Beery provide fun running their 
tubgoat about Seattle. Not exactly a "Min and 
Bill," but splendid entertainment. (Oct.) 

• TURN BACK THE CLOCK— M-G-M.— Lee 
Tracy does a bang-up job as a man given a 
chance to live his life over again. Mae Clarke, Peggy 
Shannon, Otto Kruger, others; a fast-moving, grip- 
ping story. ( Nov.) 

• VOLTAIRE— Warners.— A triumph for 
George Arliss, as the whimsical French phil- 
osopher intriguing at court. Reginald Owen superb 
as Louis XV. (Sept.) 

W A FFLES — Helen Mitchell Prod.— They 
shouldn't have tried making a Southern girl of Sari 
Maritza. The rest of it is in keeping with this mis- 
take. ( Nov.) 

WALLS OF GOLD— Fox.— Sally Eilers, others, 
wander dully through a dull tale about marrying for 
money after a lovers' falling out. (Dec.) 

WALTZ TIME — Gaumont-British. — Charming 
music helps a dull, draggy story. (Dec.) 



• WARRIOR'S HUSBAND, THE — Fox- 
Broad satire about the Amazons of old — women 
warriors, led by Queen Marjorie Rambeau and Elissa 
Landi. But Ernest Truex, by a trick, lets the Greeks 
win; and how the Amazons like what happens then! 
Excellent fun. (July) 

WAY TO LOVE, THE— Paramount.— Maurice 
Chevalier wants to be a Paris guide, but finds himself 
sheltering gypsy Ann Dvorak in his roof-top home. 
Plenty of fun then. (Dec.) 

WHAT PRICE INNOCENCE?— Columbia.— 
Parents Minna Gombell, Bryant Washburn, won't 
tell daughter Jean Parker the truth about sex, as 
advised by doctor Willard Mack; tragedy follows. 
A powerful sermon. (Sept.) 

• WHEN LADIES MEET— M-G-M.— Unexcit- 
ing, but brilliantly acted. Ann Harding as wife, 
Myrna Loy as menace, Frank Morgan, Alice Brady, 
Bob Montgomery. (Aug.) 

WHEN STRANGERS MARRY— Columbia — 
A dull piece, offering nothing new, about why white 
men's wives go wrong in the tropics. Jack Holt, 
Lilian Bond. (Aug.) 

WILD BOYS OF THE ROAD— First National — 
A will-done story of youngsters who turned hoboes 
during the depression. (Dec.) 

WOMAN I STOLE, THE— Columbia.— Herge- 
sheimer's "Tampico" done in Algeria. Big oil man 
Jack Holt after Donald Cook's wife, Fay Wray. 
Fair. (Sept.) 

• WORLD CHANGES, THE— First National. 
— Paul Muni splendid in the life story of a 
Dakota farm boy who amasses a fortune in the meat 
packing industry, but is ruined by greedy snobbish 
relatives. (Dec.) 

WORLD GONE MAD, THE— Majestic Pictures. 
— A scrambled thriller, about crooked bankers who 
hire gangsters to avoid exposure; doesn'tclick. (July) 

WORST WOMAN IN PARIS?, THE— Fox.— 

Adolphe Menjou, Benita Hume, Harvey Stephens, in 
a mild tale about a misunderstood woman. (Dec.) 

WRECKER, THE — Columbia. — So-so story 
about he-man Jack Holt, in the house-wrecking busi- 
ness, who loses his wife (Genevieve Tobin) to home- 
wrecker Sidney Blackmer. George E. Stone great as 
a junkman. (Oct.) 




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I 12 



Photoplay Magazine for January, 1934 



Its lUorse News of the Fan Clubs 



TO BE POOR 
at 

Christmas 
Time . . . 



Other parents taking dolls and trains 
and neu? clothes to their children . . . 
lpur boy and girl wondering u?hy they 
are passed by . . . not understanding 
that the Blue Eagle can't help euery one. 

Long lists of needy families . . looking 
to <The Salvation Army . . . 686,946 
Christmas Dinners last year . . . 319,283 
children made happy ipith gifts . . . 

1 eople don t Intend to be thoughtless . . . 
they jast forget . . . and Ohristmas passes. 

MAIL l]OUR CHECK OR HIONEIJ ORDER 
TODA1J TO : * 




COmTTlANDER 
EUANQELINE BOOTH 

Tlational Headquarters 

CTHE SALUATION ARTTll] 

[Incorporated] 

120-130 TDest 14th Street 
Tleu> Uork, N. TJ. 




(Jr, if you prefer, send your gift to 
your Local branch of tS«e Salvation 
Cjrmy. {jifts may be designated for any 
specific purpose or district. 



REPORTS to the Photoplay Association 
of Movie Fan Clubs from the Chicago 
group of fan clubs reveal plans for the 
production of three one act plays. All clubs 
in the Chicago area are discussing this event, 
and each play is to be an original written by 
club members. The first play is scheduled for 
showing shortly after the holidays. This 
marks the beginning of the first serious work 
by the Chicago clubs as a group. 

""THE Billie Dove Fan Club, of which 
- 1 - Lenore A. Heidorn, 5737 South Artesian 
Ave., Chicago, is president, celebrated its 
fifth anniversary with a big party at Miss 
Heidorn's home. 

The Ruth Roland Club, Lillian Conrad, 
President, 4822 Meade Ave., Chicago, and the 
Johnny Downs Fan Club, Ruth E. Keast, 
President, 3506 West 64th St., Chicago, 
recently celebrated their third successful year 
of operation. 

Anna Glance, 7953 Merrill Ave., Chicago, 
president of the Jackie Cooper Club, probably 
has the honor of having the youngest member. 
Miss Barbara Woods, two weeks old niece of 
Miss Glance, has been signed up for member- 
ship. 

Bonnie Bergstrom, 6805 South Artesian 
Ave., Chicago, president of the Barbara 
Stanwyck Buddies, announces that Miss 
Stanwyck recently passed through Chicago 
on her way West after having completed a 
personal appearance tour in the East. 

Ethel Musgrove, secretary of the Ramon 
Novarro Fan Club (Canada), 6384 Elgin St., 
Vancouver, B. C, Canada, announces that 
the name of the organization has been changed 
to the Ramon Novarro Service League. 

Lillian Musgrave, 2700 Vincent Ave., 
North, Minneapolis, Minn., president of the 
John Boles Music Club, just sent in the first 
bulletin issued by the club. It is nicely arranged 
and goes to show that a club can issue an 
interesting paper. 

The Bodil Rosing Fan Club has been send- 
ing in some interesting bulletins entitled 
" Bodil and Her Fans." Mrs. Millie Wist, 
editor, edits the paper in Hollywood so that 



the club members really get first hand in- 
formation about the news of the studios. 

A note from J. H. Bloss, 514 Scott Avenue, 
Syracuse, New York, president of the Herald 
Cinema Critics Club, states that the club 
put on a half-hour broadcast of a tabloid 
version of "Footlight Parade" over WSYR. 

Chaw Mank, 226 E. Mill St., Staunton, 111., 
president of the Movie Fans Friendship 
Club, announces that he has organized a 
Dick Powell Club. The M. F. F. C. has been 
growing according to Chaw and he has bright 
hopes for the future of his newest club. 

1 I 'HE association has a number of club 
■*■ applications pending, including: 

Dick Powell Club, Chaw Mank, President, 
226 East Mill St., Staunton, 111. 

Tom Brown Club, Donato R. Cedrone, 
President, 288 Nevada St., Newtonville, Mass. 

Bodil Rosing Fan Club, Mrs. Millie Wist, 
Editor, 177 South Citrus Ave., Los Angeles, 
and Mrs. Martin Boyer, President, 1121 East 
Ferry Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Maureen O'Sullivan Club, Marionne Op- 
penheim, Secretary, 242 East 94th St., New 
York, N. Y. 

Gloria Stuart Fan Club, Estelle Nowark, 
President, 3223 North Central Park Ave., 
Chicago, 111. 

Screen Guild Fan Club, James J. Earie, 
President, 104 West River St., Elyria, Ohio. 

IMPORTANT 

r pHE question of a 1934 Fan Club Conven- 
*■ tion has been brought up for discussion in 
several clubs. Last year the first, and a very 
successful gathering, was held in Chicago in 
June. Several clubs failed to receive notice 
of the convention and therefore did not 
attend. 

In view of the many important questions 
that such a meeting involves we would like to 
have you begin discussing the convention 
now with your various members. Any sug- 
gestions which you may have will be welcomed. 
It is desired to make the second annual con- 
vention an outstanding success. 



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Keystone 



If you're an "old-timer" you will recognize most of them. They're stars of 
the past. Standing, left to right, are Lionel Belmore, Maurice Costello, 
Paul Panzer, Mrs. Panzer, Bryant Washburn, Anita Stewart, J. Stuart 
Blackton, Mrs. Blackton, Marion Constance Blackton. Seated: Florence 
Turner, Kate Price, Bud Duncan, Mary Anderson, Flora Finch, Ben 
Turpin. They're planning a movie "comeback" in "The Film Parade" 






Photoplay Magazine for January, 1934 

Addresses of the Stars 



"3 



Hollywood, Calif. 



Paramount Studios 



Brian Alicrne 
Judith Allan 
Lona Andre 
Richard Aden 
George Barbier 
Mary Boland 
Grace Bradley 
Kathleen Burke 
Burns and Allen 
Glaudette Colbert 
Gary Cooper 
Buster Crabbe 
Bins Crosby 
Dorothy Dell 
Marlene Dietrich 
Frances Drake 
W. C. Fields 
William Fravvley 
Frances Fuller 
Cary Grant 
Shirley Grey 
Verna Hillie 
Miriam Hopkins 
Roscoe Karns 
Percy Kilbride 



Jack La Rue 
Charles Laughton 
Baby LeRoy 
John Davis Lodge 
Carole Lombard 
Fredric March 
Herbert Marshall 
Four Marx Brothers 
Jack Oakie 
Gail Patrick 
George Raft 
Lyda Roberti 
Lanny Ross 
Charlie Ruggles 
Randolph S 
Sylvia Sidii 
Alison Skip worth 
Sir Guv Standing 
Kent Taylor 
Evelyn Venable 
Mae West 
Dorothea Wieck 
Toby Wing 
Elizabeth Young 



Fox Studios, 1401 N. Western Ave. 



Rosemary' Ames 
Heather Angel 
Lew Ayres 
Jane Barnes 
Mona Barrie 
Warner Baxter 
Irene Bentley 
John Boles 
Clara Bow 
Nigel Bruce 
Henrietta Crosman 
Frances Dee 
Florence Desmond 
James Dunn 
Sally Eilers 
Stepin Fetchit 
Norman Foster 
Preston Foster 
Dixie Frances 
Henry Garat 
Janet Gaynor 
Lilian Harvey 
Alfred Hesse 



Rochelle Hudson 
G. P. Huntley, Jr. 
Roger Imhof 
Suzanne Kaaren 
Miriam Jordan 
Victor Jory 
Howard Lally 
William Lawrence 
Eleanor Lynn 
Philip Merivale 
Ralph Morgan 
Herbert Mundin 
George O'Brien 
Will Rogers 
Raul Roulien 
Wini Shaw 
Sid Silvers 
Spencer Tracy 
Claire Trevor 
Helen Vinson 
Blanca Vischer 
June Vlasek 



RKO-Radio Pictures, 780 Gower St. 



Fred Astaire 
Nils Asther 
Constance Bennett 
June Brewster 
Clive Brook 
Bruce Cabot 
William Cagney 
Mowita Castanada 
Chick Chandler 
Alden Chase 
Jean Connors 
Dolores Del Rio 
Richard Dix 
Irene Dunne 
Charles Fan-ell 
Betty Furness 
Skeets Gallagher 
William Gargan 
Wynne Gibson 
Ann Harding 



Katharine Hepburn 
Dorothy Jordan 
Pert Kelton 
Edgar Kennedy 
Francis Lederer 
Dorothy Lee 
Eric Linden 
Helen Mack 
Sari Maritza 
Joel McCrea 
Colleen Moore 
Ginger Rogers 
Robert Shayne 
Adele Thomas 
Nvdia Westman 
Bert Wheeler 
Thelma White 
Howard Wilson 
Robert Woolsey 



United Artists Studios, 1041 N. Formosa 
Ave. 



Eddie Cantor 
Charles Chaplin 
Ronald Colman 



Douglas Fairbanks 
Mary Pickford 

Anna Sten 



20th Century Studios, 1041 N. Formosa 
Ave. 



Judith Anderson 
George Arliss 
George Bancroft 
Sally Blane 
Constance Cummings 



Arline Judge 
Paul Kelly 
Blossom Seeley 
Fay Wray 
Loretta Young 



Columbia Studios, 1438 Gower St. 



Walter Connolly 
Donald Cook 
Richard Cromwell 
Jack Holt 
Elissa Landi 
Edmund Lowe 
Tim McCoy 



Grace Moore 
Toshia Mori 
Jessie Ralph 
Gene Raymond 
Joseph Schildkraut 
Iris Sotherfl 
Dorothy Tree 



Culver City, Calif. 



Hal Roach Studios 

Charlev Chase 
Billy Gilbert 
( lliver Hardy 
Patsy Kelly 
Stan 1 
Dorothy Layton 



Lillian Moore 
Billy Nelson 
Our Gang 
Nena Quartaro 
Thelma Todd 
Oliver Wakefield 



Metro-Gold wyn-Mayer Studios 



Elizabeth Allan 
Agnes Anderson 
Max Baer 
John Barrymore 
Lionel Barrymore 
Wallace Beery 
Mice Brady 
Charles Butterworth 
Mary Carlisle 
Ruth Channing 
Mar Clarke 
Jackie Cooper 
Joan Crawford 
Marion Davies 
Marie Dressier 
Jimmy Durante 
Nelson Eddy 
St uart Erwin 
Madge Evans 
Muriel Evans 
(lark Gable 
Greta Garbo 
C. Henry Gordon 
Russell Hardie 
Jean Harlow 
Helen Hayes 
Ted Healy 
Jean Hersholt 
Irene Hervey 
Phillips Holmes 
Jean Howard 
Walter Huston 
Isabel Jewell 



Otto Kruger 
Myrna Loy 
Ben Lyon 
Jeanette MacDonald 

'Mala 

Margaret McConnell 
Florine McKinney 
Una Merkel 
Robert Montgomery 
Polly Moran 
Frank Morgan 
Karen Morlej 
Ramon Novarro 
Maureen O'SulIivan 
Earl Oxford 
Jean Parker 
Jack Pearl 
Nat Pendleton 
Esther Ralston 
May Robson 
Ruth Selwyn 
Norma Shearer 
Martha Sleeper 
Mona Smith 
Lewis Stone 
Franchot Tone 
Lee Tracy 
Lupe Velez 
Johnny Weissmuller 
Ed Wynn 
Diana Wynyard 
Robert Young 



Universal City, Calif. 

Universal Studios 



Robert Allen 
Vilma Banky 
Vince Barnett 
Andy Devine 
Louise Fazenda 
Sterling Holloway 
Leila Hyams 
Buck Jones 
Boris Karloff 
Jan Kiepura 
Evalyn Knapp 
June Knight 
Paul Lukas 
Mabel Marden 



Ken Maynard 
Chester Morris 
Charlie Murray 
ZaSu Pitts 
Roger Pryor 
Claude Rains 
George Sidney 
Onslow Stevens 
Gloria Stuart 
Margaret Sullavan 
Slim Summerville 
Luis Trenker 
Alice White 



Burbank, Calif. 

Warners-First National Studios 



Loretta Andrews 
Mary Astor 
Robert Barrat 
Richard Barthelmess 
George Blackwood 
Joan Blondell 
Joe E. Brown 
Lynn Browning 
James Cagney 
Hobart Cavanaugh 
Ruth Ciiatterton 
Dorothy Coonan 
Ricardo Cortez 
Bette Davis 
Claire Dodd 
Ruth Donnelly 
Ann Dvorak 
Patricia Ellis 
Glenda Farrell 
Philip Faversham 
Helen Foster 
Kay Francis 
Geraine Grear 
Hugh Herbert 
Arthur Hohl 
Ann Hovey 
Leslie Howard 
Alice Jans 
Allen Jenkins 
Al Jolson 
Paul Kaye 



Ruby Keeler 
Guy Kibbee 
Lorena Layson 
Margaret Lindsay 
Marjorie Lytell 
Aline MacMahon 
Helen Mann 
Frank McHugh 
Adolphe Menjou 
Jean Muir 
Paul Muni 
Theodore Newton 
Pat O'Brien 
Henry O'Neill 
Edwin Phillips 
Dick Powell 
William Powell 
Phillip Reed 
Edward G. Robinson 
Barbara Rogers 
Katlnvn Sergava 
Barbara Stanwyck 
Lyle Talbot 
Sheila Terry 
Genevieve Tobin 
Juliette Ware 
Gordon Westcott 
Renee Whitney 
Warren William 
Pat Wing 
Donald Woods 



NEW 




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H4 




The Social Embassy 

of Two Continents 



Photoplay Magazine for January, 1934 

Screen Memories From Photoplay 

15 Years Ago 



IN NEW YORK 

This world-famous hotel offers 
the finest accommodations, ser- 
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Celebrities of the diplomatic, 
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most famous thoroughfare. 

Single Rooms -from $5 

Double Rooms from $7 

THEO KROELL, General Manager 

AMBASSADOR 

Park Avenue at 5 1st, New York 



'A Woman may Harry 
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Don't let romance and love pass you by. Send us 
only 10c and we will send you the booklet entitled 
"Secrets of Fascinating Womanhood"— an inter- 
esting synopsis of the revelations in "Fascinating 
Womanhood." Sent in plain wrapper. Psychology 
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TN our issue of January, 1919, 
-*-the "post-war" epoch of films 
was fairly under way — with some 
curiously prophetic comments! 
We remarked that America was 
the nation best fitted to heal war 
wounds, and that movies would 
be a great "good will" force, to 
promote understanding among 
nations. How true that proved, 
in view of the world-wide clamor 
later that movies were "Amer- 
icanizing" the youth of every 
land! 

Madge Kennedy told — and how odd this 
sounds now — about coming from California to 
New York to get her start in movies ! She did it 
at just about the time the movies were mi- 
grating from New York to California. Another 
"sign of the times" — air mail had been started, 
and one of the first "letters" mailed was 
Douglas Fairbanks, Sr. This was done to 
help speed him about the country in his war 
work. 




Madge 
Kennedy 



Up to this time, actresses had 
been rather generally afraid of 
confessing to having children. In 
this issue a great reigning favorite 
of previous years — Kitty Gor- 
don, of the beautiful back — 
proudly presented her daughter. 
A sad note in this issue was an- 
nouncement that Harold Lock- 
wood, one of the greatest 
favorites of the day, had died. 
Another favorite, Montagu Love, 
explained in this issue that he 
wouldn't give details about him- 
self, because he believed this shifted interest 
too much from the film to the actor. Little 
chance he was to have, of turning away the 
fast-kindling publicity spotlight! 

Of the month's films, Caruso's first screen 
effort was most interesting. We said, though, 
that directors must have been too awed to 
direct, for it didn't turn out so well. Theda 
Bara's much heralded "Salome" we called a 
mess. On the cover — Marie Doro. 



10 Years Ago 



BY January, 1924, the "golden 
year" of 1923, with all its 
reckless "million dollar" extrav- 
agances, had brought dire pun- 
ishment to the movies. So many 
"super specials" had been created 
that theaters couldn't absorb 
them; so studios were shutting 
down, salaries were being cut, 
and all Hollywood was "broke." 
Relief was promised, however, as 
soon as films on hand got into 
circulation. 

Everyone seemed agog those 
days about who was to play in that sensational 
film, Elinor Glyn's "Three Weeks." So it was 
decidedly the news of the month, when we 
announced that Aileen Pringle would do the 
emoting on the tiger skin. Of the newer 
stars, we hailed Malcolm McGregor and Fred 
Thomson, the Princeton and Olympics athlete 
who became a minister, a war chaplain, and 
now was seeking to convey inspiration to right 
living by his spectacular work in "stunt" 




Aileen 
Pringle 



stories involving airplanes and 
motorcycles. 

Both Bebe Daniels and 
Richard Dix explained at length, 
"Why I Have Never Married." 
Richard wanted to find the right 
woman to be both wife and 
mother; Bebe wanted to be sure 
the marriage would last, once 
made, even though she continued 
her career. 

D. W. Griffith was blocking 
roads near New York City and 
Boston, and otherwise upsetting 
the countryside, screening "America." 

The six best pictures of the month were 
topped by Barbara La Marr's "The Eternal 
City," with Jackie Coogan next in "Long 
Live the King." The rest: "The Acquittal 
(Claire Windsor, Norman Kerry, Barbara Bed- 
ford), "Anna Christie" (Blanche Sweet), "Pon- 
jola" (Anna Q. Nilsson), "Flaming Youth" 
(Colleen Moore). On the cover— Barbara La 
Marr. 



5 Years Ago 



TN our issue of January, 1929, 
-'■we reviewed the previous year 
and awarded top honors in best 
performances to Jack Gilbert, 
with four, and Emil Jannings, 
with three. But alas! Sound 
had come, and each of these stars 
was even now in eclipse, though 
no one knew it. 

Joan Crawford was named the 
outstanding new star, although 
Janet Gaynor's "7th Heaven" 
had placed her well up. In her 
autobiography, running at the 
time, Janet told of getting her start as a Hal 
Roach extra. Aileen Pringle, who became 
famous five years ago in "Three Weeks," now 
was annoyed at being called "high-brow," 
while her partner in that film, Conrad Nagel, 
was astonishing the world with the richness 
and appeal of his voice in talkies. 

One studio was worrying about what to call 
a new character actor it had acquired. His 
name was Muni Weisenfreund, which wouldn't 




Paul 

Muni 



do. One idea was to call him 
Muni Wise, but there was fear 
people would change that to 
Money Wise. So they decided 
to call him Paul Muni. 

Talkies w 7 ere really hitting 
their stride now. Ruth Chatter- 
ton was to do Barrie's "Half an 
Hour" under title "The Doctor's 
Secret." Eric Von Stroheim was 
standing Hollywood on its ear, 
and had Gloria Swanson living 
at the studio, doing "Queen 
Kelly," the film that made much 
studio history before it was abandoned. 

Emil Jannings' "Sins of the Fathers" led 
the best films; Garbo's and Gilbert's "A 
Woman of Affairs" came next. The other 
four: "Outcast" (Corinne Griffith, Eddie 
Lowe), "Romance of the Underworld" 
(Corinne Griffith, Robert Elliott), "Scarlet 
Seas" (Richard Barthelmess), "Red Wine" 
(Conrad Nagel). Cover honors went to 
Madge Bellamy. 



Photoplay Magazine tor January, 1934 



Hollywood Fashions 

by Seymour 

Here is a list of the representative stores at which faithful copies of the smart styles 
shown in this month's fashion section (Pages 61 to 66 ) can be purchased. Shop at or 
write the nearest store for complete information. 



ARKANSAS— 

Pollock's, 

fayetteville. 
Pollock's. 

fort smith. 
The M. M. Cohn Company, 

LITTLE ROCK. 

CALIFORNIA— 

J. \Y. Robinson COMPANY, 

LOS ANGELES. 

The H. C. Capwell Company, 

OAKLAND. 

Hale Brothers, Inc., 

sacramento. 
The Emporium, 

san francisco. 

COLORADO— 

The Denver Dry Goods Company, 

DENVER. 

CONNECTICUT— 

The Manhattan Shop, 
hartford. 

DELAWARE- 
ARTHUR'S Apparel Shop, Inc., 

WILMINGTON. 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA— 
Lansburgh & Brother, 
washington. 

FLORIDA- 
RUTLAND Brothers, 

ST. PETERSBURG. 

IDAHO— 
The Mode, Ltd., 

BOISE. 
ILLINOIS- 
MARSHALL Field & Company, 
CHICAGO. 

C. E. Burns Company, 

decatur. 
Clarke & Company, 

PEORIA. 

S. A. Barker Company, 

SPRINGFIELD. 

INDIANA— 

L. S. Ayres & Company, Inc., 

INDIANAPOLIS. 

IOWA— 

M. L. Parker Company, 

davenport. 
Younker Brothers, Inc., 

des moines. 
J. F. Stampfer Company, 

DUBUQUE. 

MAINE— 
B. Peck Company, 
lewiston. 

MARYLAND— 

HOCHSCHILD, KOHN & COMPANY, 
BALTIMORE. 

MASSACHUSETTS- 
JORDAN Marsh Company, 
boston. 

MICHIGAN— 
Wm. Goodyear & Company, 

ANN arbor. 
Seaman's, Inc., 

battle creek. 
The J. L. Hudson Company, 

DETROIT. 

Wurzburg's, 

grand rapids. 
Gilmork Brothers, 

kalamazoo. 
The Style Shop. 

LANSING. 



MINNESOTA— 
The Dayton Company, 
minneapolis. 

MISSOURI— 
Sn\. Baek & Fuller Company, 
saint LOUIS. 

NEBRASKA— 
Orkin Brotiii rs 

LINCOLN. 

NEW JERSEY— 
11 mini; & Company, 

NEWARK. 

NEW YORK— 
Kalet's, 

AUBURN. 

Abraham & Straus, 

brooklyn. 
J. N. Adam & Company, 

buffalo. 
The Parisian, Inc., 

ithaca. 
Bloomingdali 's. 

new york city. 
H. S. Barney Company, 

schenectady. 
Flah & Company, 

syracuse. 
D. Price & Company, 

utica. 

NORTH CAROLINA— 
J. B. Ivey & Company, 
charlotte. 

( )HIO— 

The A. Polsky Company, 

AKRON. 

The Mabley and Carew Co.. 

cincinnati. 
The Higbie Company, 

cleveland. 
The Morehouse-Martens Company, 

colltmbus. 
The Rike-Ku.mi.er Co., 

dayton. 
The Strouss-Hirschberg Company 

youngstown. 

OKLAHOMA— 
Pollock's, 

mcalester. 

PENNSYLVANIA- 
ERIE Dry Goods Company, 

ERIE. 

Bowman & Company, 

harrisburg. 
Joseph Horne Company, 

pittsburgh. 
Worth's, Inc., 

YORK. 

TEXAS— 
Levy Brothers Dry Goods Company, 

HOUSTON. 

The Wolff & Marx Company, 
san antonio. 

UTAH— 
Zion's Co-operative Mercantile Insti- 
tion, 
salt lake CITY. 

WISCONSIN— 

Stuart's, 
milwaukee. 

WEST VIRGINIA- 
CO yle & Richardson, Inc., 

CHARLESTON. 




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Casts of Current Photoplays 

Complete for every picture reviewed in this issue 



"BEFORE DAWN"— RKO-Radio.— From the 
story by Edgar Wallace. Screen play by Garrett 
Fort, Marion Dix and Ralph Block. Directed by 
Irving Pichel. The cast: Dwight Wilson, Stuart 
Erwin; Patricia Merrick, Dorothy Wilson; Dr. 
Cornelius, Warner Oland; Merrick, Dudley Digges; 
Mallie, Gertrude Hoffman; O'Hara, Oscar Apfel; 
Mrs. Marble, Jane Darwell; Joe Valerie, Frank 
Reicher. 

"BLOOD MONEY"— 20th Century-United 
Artists. — From the screen play by Rowland Brown 
and Hal Long. Directed by Rowland Brown. The 
cast: Bill Bailey, George Bancroft; Elaine Talbert, 
Frances Dee; Drury Darling, Chick Chandler; Ruby 
Darling, Judith Anderson. Also: Blossom Seeley, 
Etienne Girardot, George Rigas. Theresa Harris, 
Kathlyn Williams, John Bleifer, Ann Brody, Henry 
Lewis, Jr., Sandra Shaw, Henry Kolker, Bradley 
Page. 

"CHRISTOPHER BEAN"— M-G-M.— From the 
play "The Late Christopher Bean" adapted by 
Sidney Howard from the play " Prenez Garde a la 
Peinture" by Rene Fauchois. Screen play by Sylvia 
Thalberg and Laurence E. Johnson. Directed by 
Sam Wood. The cast: Abby, Marie Dressier; Dr. 
Haggett, Lionel Barrymore; Susan, Helen Mack; 
Mrs. Haggett, Beulah Bondi; Warren, Russell 
Hardie; Rosen, Jean Hersholt; Davenport, H. B. 
Warner; Ada, Helen Shipman; Tallenl, George 
Coulouris; Maid, Ellen Lowe. 

"COLLEGE COACH"— Warners.— From the 
story by Niven Busch and Manuel Seff. Directed by 
William A. Wellman. The cast: Phil Sargent, Dick 
Powell; Claire Gore, Ann Dvorak; Coach Gore, Pat 
O'Brien; Dr. Philip Sargent, Arthur Byron; Buck 
Weaver, Lyle Talbot; Bametl, Hugh Herbert; Mat- 
thews, Guinn Williams; Petrowski, Nat Pendleton; 
Editor, Philip Faversham; Hauser, Charles Wilson; 
Spencer Trask, Donald Meek; Otis, Berton Churchill; 
Seymour Young, Arthur Hohl; Professor, Harry 
Beresford; Glantz, Herman Bing; Holcomb, Joseph 
Sauers; Westerman, Phillip Reed. 

"CRADLE SONG"— Paramount.— From the 
play by Gregorio Martinez Sierra. Screen play by 
Marc Connolly and Frank Partos. Directed by 
Mitchell Leisen. The cast: Joanna, Dorothea 
Wieck; Teresa, Evelyn Venable; The Doctor, Sir Guy 
Standing; Prioress, Louise Dresser; Antonio, Kent 
Taylor; Marcella, Gertrude Michael; Vicaress, 
Georgia Caine; Alberto, Dickie Moore; Sagrario, 
Nydia Westman; lnes, Marion Ballou; Mistress of 
Novices, Eleanor Wesselhoeft; Christina, Diane 
Sinclair; Pepita, Yvonne Pelletier; Tomas, David 
Durand; Carmen, Bonita Granville; Sabina, Rosita 
Butler; Priest, Mischa Auer; Maria Luccia, Gail 
Patrick; Tornera, Gertrude Norman; Mayor, Howard 
Lang. 

"DANCE, GIRL, DANCE" — Invincible. — From 
the story by Robert Ellis. Directed by Frank 
Strayer. The cast: Sally, Evalyn Knapp; Valentine, 
Alan Dinehart; Claudette, Ada May; Joe, Eddie 
Nugent; Lou Kendall, Mae Busch; Cleo, Gloria 
Shea; Mozart, George Grandee. 

"DER SOHN DER WEISSEN BERGE" ("The 
Son of the White Mountains") — Itala Film. — From 
the story by Luis Trenker. Directed by Mario 
Bonnard. The cast: Turri, Luis Trenker; Coste, 
Carl Steiner; Morel, Emmerich Albert; Mary, 
Renate Muller; Annie, Maria Solveg. 

"DESIGN FOR LIVING"— Paramount.— From 
the play by Noel Coward. Screen play by Hen 
Hecht. Directed by Ernst Lubitsch. The cast: 
Tom Chambers, Fredric March; George Curtis, Gary 
Cooper; Gilda Farrell, Miriam Hopkins; Max 
Plunketl, Edward Everett Horton; Mr. Douglas, 
Franklin Pangborn; Conductor, Emile Chautard; 
Lisping Stenographer, Isabel Jewell; Tom's Secre- 
tary, Nora Cecil; Cafe Proprietress, Adrienne D'- 
Ambricourt; Art Commissioner, Armand Kaliz. 

"DUCK SOUP"— Paramount.— From the story 
by Bert Kalmar and Harry Ruby. Directed by Leo 
McCarey. The cast: Rufus T. Firefly, Groucho 
Marx; Chicolini, Chico Marx; Brownie, Harpo Marx; 
Bob Rolland, Zeppo Marx; Vera Marcal, Raquel 
Torres; Ambassador Trenlino, Louis Calhern; Mrs. 
Teasdale, Margaret Dumont; Secretary, Ycrna 
Hillie; Agitator, Leonid Kinsky; Zander, Edmund 
Breese; Secretary of War, Edwin Maxwell. 

"FEMALE"— First National. — 'From the story 
by Donald Henderson Clarke. Screen play by 
Gene Markey and Kathryn Scola. Directed by 
Michael Curtiz. The cast: Alison Drake, Rutii 
Chatterton; Jim Thorne, George Brent; Claybourne. 
Philip Faversham; Miss Frollungham, Ruth Don- 
nelly; Cooper, John Mack Brown; Harriet, Lois 
Wilson; Briggs, Gavin Gordon; Fuggy, Huey White; 
Delia, Rafaela Ottiano; Jarrat, Walter Walker; 
Detective, Charles Wilson; Butler, Edward Cooper; 
Footmen, Eric Wilton, Usay O'Davern; Bradley, 
Samuel Hinds; Drunk boy. Sterling Holloway; 
Pelligrew, Ferdinand Gottschalk. 

116 



"HAVANA WIDOWS" — First National. — 
From the story by Earl Baldwin. Directed by Ray 
Enright. The cast: Mae Knight, Joan Blondell; 
Sadie Appleby, Glenda Farrell; Deacon Jones, Guy 
Kibbee; Bob Jones, Lyle Talbot; Herman Brody, 
Allen Jenkins; Duffy, Frank McHugh; Mrs. Jones, 
Ruth Donnelly; Mr. Otis, Hobart Cavanaugh; Butch 
O'Neill, Ralph Ince; Mullins, George Cooper; Mrs. 
Ryan, Maude Eburne; Timberg, Charles Wilson; 
Wheelman, Garry Owen. 

"HELL AND HIGH WATER"— Paramount — 
From the story "Captain Jericho" by Max Miller. 
Adapted by Agnes Brand Leahy. Directed by 
Grover Jones and William Slavens McNutt. The 
cast: Captain Jericho, Richard Aden; Sally Driggs, 
Judith Allen; Peck Wealin, Charles Grapewin; Rear 
Admiral, Sir Guy Standing; Barney, Robert Knettles; 
Mom Wealin, Gertrude Hoffman; Joe Satsanuki, S. 
Matsui; Milton J. Bunsey, William Frawley; Bar- 
ney's mother, Esther Muir; Japanese Girl, Iris 
Yamaoka; Bradley, the Pilot, John Marston; Dance 
Hall Manager, Barton MacLane; Interpreter, Mike 
Morita; Harbor Master's Clerk, Franklin Parker; 
Lieutenent Saunders, Selmer Jackson. 

"HOOPLA"— Fox.— From the play "The Bar- 
ker" by John Kenyon Nicholson. Screen play by 
Bradley King and Joseph Moncure March. Directed 
by F'rank Lloyd. The cast: Lou, Clara Bow; Nifty, 
Preston Foster; Chris, Richard Cromwell; Hap, 
Herbert Mundin; Jerry, James Gleason; Carrie, 
Minna Gombell; Colonel Gowdy, Roger Imhof; 
Ma Benson, Florence Roberts. 

"HOUSE ON 56TH STREET, THE"— Warners. 
— From the novel by Joseph Santley. Screen play 
by Austin Parker and Sheridan Gibney. Directed by 
Robert Florey. The cast: Peggy Martin, Kay Francis; 
Blaine, Ricardo Cortez; Monty Van Tyle, Gene 
Raymond; Eleanor, Margaret Lindsay; Fiske, John 
Halliday; Hunt, Frank McHugh; Dolly, Sheila Terry; 
Dr. Wyman, Henry O'Neill; Freddie, Theodore New- 
ton; Mrs. Van Tyle, Nella Walker; Curtis, Samuel 
Hinds; Girls in sextette, Renee Whitney, Pat Wing, 
Helen Barclay, Lorena Layson; Henry, Hardie 
Albright; Bonclli, William Boyd. 

" INVINSIBLE MAN, THE— Universal.— From 
the novel by H. G. Wells. Screen play by R. C. 
Sherriff. Directed by James Whale. The cast: 
The Invisible One, Claude Rains; Flora Gravity, 
Gloria Stuart; Doctor Kemp, William Harrigan; 
Doctor Cranley, Henry Travers; Mrs. Hall, Una 
O'Connor; Mr. Hall, Forrester Harvey; Chief of 
Police, Holmes Herbert; Jaffers, E. E. Clive; Chief 
of Detectives, Dudley Digges; Inspector Bird, Harry 
Stubbs; Inspector Lane, Donald Stuart; Milly, Merle 
Tottenham. 

"KING FOR A NIGHT"— Universal.— From 
the story by William Anthony McGuire. Screen 
play by William Anthony McGuire and Jack O'Don- 




Blondes, beware ! You'd better watch 
out — here's competition for you ! 
Shirley Temple is already queen of 
Educational's Baby Burlesk troup, 
and she's breaking lots of hearts 



nell. Directed by Kurt Neumann. The cast: 
Bud (Kid) Gloves, Chester Morris; Lillian, Helen 
Twelvetrees; Evelyn, Alice White; Douglas, John 
Miljan; Reverend Gloves, Grant Mitchell; Hymie, 
George E. Stone; John Gloves, George Meeker; Dick, 
Frank Albertson; Goofy, Warren Hymer; Merkle, 
Harland Tucker; The Champ, Harry Galfund; 
Whistler, Clarence Wilson; Dora, Dorothy Granger; 
Boy, George Billings; Manny, John Sheehan; McCue, 
Wade Boteler; Heavyweight, Maxie Rosenbloom. 

"LITTLE WOMEN"— RKO-R\dio.— From the 
story by Louisa May Alcott. Screen play by Sarah 
Y. Mason and Victor Heerman. Directed by 
George Cukor. The cast: Jo, Katharine Hepburn; 
Amy, Joan Bennett; Fritz Bhaer, Paul Lukas; Meg, 
Frances Dee; Beth, Jean Parker; Aunt March, Edna 
May Oliver; Laurie, Douglass Montgomery; Mr. 
Laurence, Henry Stephenson; Marmee, Spring 
Byington; Mr. March, Samuel Hinds; Hannah, 
Mabel Colcord; Brooke, John Davis Lodge; Mamie, 
Nydia Westman. 

"LONE COWBOY"— Paramount.— From the 
screen play by Paul Sloane. Adapted by Agnes 
Brand Leahy and bobby Vernon. Directed by Paul 
Sloane. The cast: Scooter O'Neal, Jackie Cooper; 
Eleanor Jones, Lila Lee; Bill O'Neal, John Wray; 
'Dobe Jones, Addison Richards; Jim Weston, Gavin 
Gordon; J. J. Baxter, Barton MacLane; Mr. Curran, 
J. M. Kerrigan; Mr. Burton, Dell Henderson; 
Junkman, Joe Barton; Buck, William LeMaire; 
Zeke, Irving Bacon; Marshall, Charles Middleton; 
Boarding House Keeper, Lillian Harmer; Postman, 
William Robbins. 

"MAD GAME, THE"— Fox.— From the story 
by William Conselman. Screen play by William 
Conselman and Henry Johnson. Directed by Irving 
Cummings. The cast: Edward Carson, Spencer 
Tracy; Jane Lee, Claire Trevor; Judge Penfield, 
Ralph Morgan; Thomas Penfield, Howard Lally; 
Cliopper Allen, J. Carrol Naish; William Bennett, 
John Miljan; Butts McGee, Matt McHugh; Marilyn 
Kirk, Kathleen Burke; Lila Penfield, Mary Mason; 
Warden, Willard Robertson; Doctor, John Davidson; 
Lou, Paul Fix; Mike, Jerry Devine. 

"MY LIPS BETR\Y"— Fox.— From the play 
"Der Komet" by Attila Orbok. Screen play by 
Hans Kraly and Jane Storm. Directed by John 
Blystone. The cast: Lili, Lilian Harvey; King 
Rupert, John Boles; Stigmat, El Brendel; Queen 
Mother, Irene Browne; Mama Watcheck, Maude 
Eburne; De Conti, Henry Stephenson; Weininger, 
Herman Bing. 

"MY WOMAN" — Columbl\. — F~rom the story by 
Brian Marlow. Directed by Victor Schertzinger. 
The cast: Connie, Helen Twelvetrees; Bradley, Victor 
Jory; Chick, Wallace Ford; Muriel, Claire Dodd; 
Butler, Warren Hymer; Pop Riley, Raymond Brown; 
Miller, Hobart Cavanaugh; Agent, Charles Levison; 
McCluskey, Ralph Freud; Cargle, William Jeffrey; 
Treech, Lester Crawford; Webster, Boothe Howard; 
Studio Manager, Edwin Stanley; Asst. Manager, 
Lorin Raker; Agent, Harry Holman. 

"OLSEN'S BIG MOMENT"— Fox.— From the 
story by George Marshall. Screen play by Henry 
Johnson and James Tynan. Directed by Malcolm 
St. Clair. The cast: Knute Olsen, El Brendel; 
Robert Brewster III, Walter Catlett; Jane Van Allen, 
Barbara Weeks; Virginia West, Susan Fleming; 
Harry Smith, John Arledge; Mrs. Van Allen, Maidel 
Turner; Joe "Monk" West, Edward Pawley; Danny 
Reynolds, Joseph Sauers. 

"ONLY YESTERDAY"— Universal. — From the 
story by Frederick Lewis Allen. Screen play by 
Arthur Richman and George O'Neill. Directed by 
John M. Stahl. The cast: Mary Lane, Margaret 
Sullavan; Jim Emerson, John Boles; Julia Warren, 
Billie Burke; Bob, Reginald Denny; Jim, Jr., Jimmy 
Butler; Leona, Edna May Oliver; Phyllis Emerson, 
Benita Hume; Dave Reynolds, George Meeker; 
Deborah, June Clyde; Amy, Marie Prevost; Mr. 
Lane, Oscar Apfel; Mrs. Lane, Jane Darwell; Bob 
Lane, Tom Conlon; Goodhcarl, Berton Churchill; 
Barnard, Onslow Stevens; Tom, Franklin Pangborn; 
Barnes, Walter Catlett; Lelitia, Noel Francis; 
Scott Hayes, Bramwell F'letcher; Jerry, Barry Nor- 
ton; Burton, Arthur Hoyt; Lucy, Natalie Moorhead; 
Margot, Joyce Compton; Mrs. Vincent, Betty Blythe; 
Charlie Smith, Grady Sutton; Eleanor, Ruth Clifford; 
Sally, Dorothy Granger; Pally, Geneva Mitchell; 
Rcna, Dorothy Christy; A Lesbian, Jean Sorel; 
Miles, Robert McWade; Ruth, Lucille Powers; 
Graves, Crauford Kent; Harper, Ferdinand Munier; 
Toodie, Gay Seabrook; Grace, Marion Byron; Belly, 
Jean Hart; Lee, Leon Waycoff; Billy, James Flavin; 
Mclntyre, Warren Stokes; Hugh, Hugh Enfield; 
Helen, Mabel Marden; May, Sheila Mannors; 
Butler, Edgar Norton; Second Butler, Sidney Bracy; 
Preston, Herbert Corthell; Ethel, Vivian Oakland; 
Rex, Bert Roach; Porter, Deacon McDaniels; Abby, 
Louise Beavers. 

"POLICE CAR 17" — Columbia.— From the 
story by Lambert Hillyer. Directed by Lambert 
Hillyer. The cast: Tim Conlon, Tim McCoy; Helen 
Regan, Evalyn Knapp; Dan Regan, Wallis Clark; 



Photoplay Magazine ior January, 1934 



l 7 



Bumps O'Neill, Ward Bond; Johnny Davis, Harold 
Hubcr; "Big Bill" Standish, Edwin Maxwell; Harry. 
Charles West; Ace Boyle, Jack Long; Captain liar!. 
DeWitt Jennings. 

"PRIZEFIGHTER AND THE LADY. THE"— 
M-G-M. — From the screen play by John Lee Mahin, 
Jr. and John Median. Directed by \Y. S. Van Dyke. 
The cast: Belle, Myroa Loy; Steve, Max Baer; 
Camera, Primo Camera; Promoter. Jack Dempsey; 
Professor. Walter Huston; Willie Ryan, Otto Kruger; 
Bugsie, Vince Barnett; Adopted Son. Robert McWade; 
Linda, Muriel Evans; Cabaret Girl, Jean Howard. 

"QUATORZE JUILLET" ("July 14")— Protex 
Pictures. — From the story by Rene Clair. Directed 
by Rene Clair. The east: Anna, Annabella; 1'ola, 
Pola Illery, Jean. Georges Rigaud; Charles, Raymond 
Amos; M, Imaque, Paul Olivier; Fernand, Thorny 
Bourdelle; Raymond, Raymond Corday. 

"RIDER OF JUSTICE"— Universal.— From the 

story by Robert Qiiifilcy. Directed by Alan James. 
The cast: Ken Lame. Ken Maynard; Ray 1 
Cecilia Parker; Sam Burkett, Hooper At( 
Bogan, Walter Rockwell; Hank Rivers. Jack Rock- 
well; Denver, Ed Brady; Imposter, Fred MacKaye; 
Red Hogan, Bill Dyer; Sheriff, Jack Richardson; 
Jim Lance, Ed Coxen; Jones, William Gould; 1 
Francis Ford; Postmaster, Late McKee; Tarzan, 
Tarzan. 

"SON OF A SAILOR"— First National.— Fmin 
the screen play by Al Cohn and PaulGerrard Smith. 
Directed by Lloyd Bacon. The cast: Handsome 
Callahan, Joe E. Brown; Helen, Jean Muir; The 
Baroness, Thelma Todd; Duke. Johnnj Mai k Brown; 
Gaga, Frank McHugh; Armstrong, George Black- 
wood; Kramer, Walter Kramer; Williams, Kenneth 
Thomson; Farnsworth, Samuel Hinds; Vincent, 
Arthur Vinton; Lee. George Irving; Lieut. Reel. 
John Marston; Sailor Johnson, Garry Owen; Slug, 
Joe Sauers; Blanding, Clay Clement; Capl. / 
Purnell Pratt; Genevieve, Sheila Terry. 

"SPECIAL INVESTIGATOR"— Universal.— 

From the screen play by Warren B. Duff and Gordon 
Kahn. Directed by Edwin L. Marin. The cast: 
Scolty Graham, Onslow Stevens; Lynn Aston. Wynne 
Gibson; Inspector Thomas, Alan Dinehart; Sergeant 
Melody, William Collier, Sr. ; Sam Collins, Warren 
Hymer; Lubeck, Edward Van Sloan; Willie, John 
Wray; Miller, Skeets Gallagher; Coslello, J. Farrell 
MacDonald; Rodgers, Harold Huber; Weems, Harry 
Seymour; Cliff, Leon Waycoff; DeCobra, Mischa 
Auer; Sam's Wife, Doris Canneld; Gerard, Wade 
Boteler; Logan, Harry Woods; U'Shea, James Flavin; 
Wilson, Arthur Hoyt; Garage Man, Sam McDaniels. 

"TAKE A CHANCE"— Paramount. — From the 
story and screen play by Lawrence Schwab, Buddy 
De Sylva and Monte Brice. Directed by Lawrence 
Schwab and Monte Brice. The cast: Duke, James 
Dunn; Louie, Cliff Edwards; Toni, June Knight; 
Wanda, Lillian Roth; Kenneth Raleigh, Charles 
"Buddy" Rogers; Thelma, Lilian Bond; Andrew 
Raleigh, Charles Richmond; Consuclo Raleigh, 
Dorothy Lee; Mike Caruso, Robert Gleckler; Miss 
Jersey City, Lona Andre. 

"VINEGAR TREE, THE"— M-G-M.— From 
the play by Paul Osborn. Screen play by Bella 
and Samuel Spewack. Directed by Harry Beau- 
mont. The cast: Augustus, Lionel Barrymore; 
Laura, Alice Brady; Max, Conway Tearle; Winifred, 
Katherine Alexander; Leone, Man' Carlisle; Geoffry, 
William Janney; Butler, Halliwell Hobbes. 

"WHITE WOMAN"— Paramount.— From the 
story by Norman Reilly Raine and Frank- Butler. 
Screen play by Samuel Hoffenstein and Gladys 
Lehman. Directed by Stuart Walker. The cast: 
Judith Denning, Carole Lombard; Horace I'rin, 
Charles Laughton; Ballister, Charles Bickford; 
David von Eltz, Kent Taylor; jakey, Percy Kilbride; 
Hambley, James Bell; Fenlon, James B. Middleton; 
Chisholm, Claude King; Mrs. Chisholm, Ethel 
Grimes; Vaegi, Jimmie Dime; Connors, Marc 
Lawrence; Native Chief No. J, Noble Johnson; 
Native Chief No. 2, Greg Whitespear. 



Heart Throb 



The newcomer cries a good deal 
the first week we take her to our 
hearts and soon, with tender 
sympathy, we have her smiling. How 
their faces light when we say, 
"Really, the time flies. We have 
movies three nights weekly." 

But won't you give us more 
"happy endings"? In reality we see 
much sorrow and tears, when movie 
night comes we want to live and be 
happy in the golden hours of make 
believe ! 

Our only joy is the movies, for 
we are patients in a tuberculosis 
sanatorium. 

Mrs. I. G., State Sanatorium, Md. 



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What $ 2!£ Will Bring You 

More than a thousand pictures of photoplayers and illus- 
trations of their work and pastime. 

Scores of interesting articles about the people you see on 
the screen. 

Splendidly written short stories, some of which you will 
see acted at your moving picture theater. 
Brief reviews with the casts of current photoplays. 
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tures, the stars, and the industry. 

You have read this issue of Photoplay, so there is no necessity for tell- 
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PHOTOPLAY MAGAZINE, Dept. 1-A, 919 No. Michigan Ave., Chicago 



Cal York's Monthly Broadcast from Hollywood 



[ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 49 




Biide and groom: Mr. and Mrs. Marty Malone. You know her better as 
Polly Moran. The photographer caught them sitting in a corner at the 
cocktail party that Nelson Eddy gave in honor of the happy newlyweds 



So Paramount provided a flamingo and 
guinea pigs for Charlotte Henry's game be- 
fore the cameras. 

The flamingo, not caring at all to join in the 
fun, bit Charlotte, whose hands and arms soon 
became covered with a rash. 

TT'S been a busy year for Mae West. 

Since last spring Mae has written her two 
screen plays, "She Done Him Wrong" and 
"I'm No Angel," acted in them and practically 
supervised them both, wrote "The Constant 
Sinner," a novelization of her famous "Dia- 
mond Lil," and practically completed her 
humorous book, "How To Misbehave." 

And in all this time she has given out two 
hundred interviews, most of which were made 
unique by the West flashing wit. 

Not bad, really. 

'"TPHEY call my voice a low bari- 
tone with a husky quaver," ex- 
plains Bing Crosby. 

"The doctors have told me that 
my particular brand of singing is due 
to a little unobtrusive growth be- 
tween my vocal cords. 

"If I ever lose it I'll probably be- 
come a hog-caller." 

Maybe the hogs wouldn't mind ! 

■""THE day Carole Lombard moved into her 
new house, she came down with a relapse of 
the flu. 

The painters hadn't entirely moved out of 
the place, and Carole says the odor was so in- 
tense she had painter's colic added to her 
other troubles. 



TN the September issue of PHOTOPLAY we 
reported that Mr. George Arliss had been 
treated by physicians with insulin. Mr. Arliss 
advises us that there is no foundation for this 
statement as he has never used insulin and 
has never been treated for any disease for 
which insulin might be prescribed. 

We regret having published this statement 
and herewith tender Mr. Arliss our apolo- 
gies. 

A LTHOUGH the rumor that Greta Garbo 
■* •■would marry her director, Rouben Ma- 
moulian, when "Queen Christina" was finished 
has been quiescent for a while, Mamoulian 
would not sign the lease for his new house in 
Beverly Hills until he had taken Greta to 
see it. 

'T^HE ex-wife of a very successful 
■*■ ex-athlete who lately has been 
doing all right in pictures says: 

"Aw, he was all right until his body 
went to his head." 

\7INCE BARNETT will have to look to 
his ribbing laurels in Hollywood with 
Florence Desmond in town. 

Florence is the imitatress who created a sen- 
sation with her phonograph record, "The 
Hollywood Party" and came right out to 
Hollywood to do her stuff for the microphones. 

She's been the sensation of more actual 
Hollywood parties, and, not content with that, 
has started calling up on the phone, pretending 
to be Garbo, or Crawford, or ZaSu Pitts, 

118 



making engagements or dishing out veiled in- 
sults until there has been much confusion 
created and many friendships threatened. 

Well, the female is always more deadly 
than the male! 

r^LAREMORE, Okla., which boasts that 
^^Rochelle Hudson also was born there, now 
has a confectionery called the "Rochelle Hud- 
son Shoppe." And how about a "Ye Olde 
Will Rogers Horse Corral and Chewing Gum 
Shoppe"? 

TT must be the Max Baer influence — heaven 
forbid — but Clark Gable, Jack Conway, 
Seymour Felix, Douglas Shearer and Stuart 
Erwin have joined a boxing class at Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer with Mike Cantwell, Baer's 
trainer, as their mentor. 

"LTAROLD LLOYD, JR., going on 
three years old and called Bud 
by everyone, was on his way to a 
party and, as usual, the car was 
stopped at the main gate of the estate 
to permit Bud to salute Bob Lewis, 
the guardian. 

"Well, Bud," said Bob, "you're 
going to have a lot of ice cream and 
candy?" 

"Yes," declared Bud, firmly, "and 
cake, too." 

"DEING up on your "Alice in Wonderland," 
you will remember they used live flamingoes 
for croquet mallets and guinea pigs for balls. 




Don English 

Three guesses! And we'll give you 
odds you're wrong! It's Claudette 
Colbert, make-up-less and plainly 
gowned for her role of the school- 
marm in "Four Frightened People" 




HOLLYWOOD IFASIM IONS <5f « «>« excUveL, k y JLcLcluti, XoL & Co. 



AT THE RIGHT: After 
the making of the 
new Columbia picture, 
"Master of Men, "pop- 
ular Fay Wray became 
so attached to this 
exquisite dinner frock 
that she purchased it 
for her personal ward- 
robe! The gown, charm- 
ing because of its slim, 
fitted tunic, is only 
one of the "Holly- 
wood Fashions" selec- 
ted by Seymour, stylist 
for Photoplay Maga- 
zine... now on display! 







On Jjalilmore ... as in Boston ... as in 
Cleveland ... as in Detroit . . ."Hollywood 
Fashions" are sold in stores known as 
"smart" (Page 115). Only in stores of fash- 
ion leadership will you find faithful copies 
of the authentic motion picture costumes 
pictured in PHOTOPLAY. (See pages 61-66). 

IPlMQTQIPILAY MAGAZINE 

919 North Michigan Avenue Chicago, Illinois 

In Association With WAKEFIELD & O'CONNOR, Inc. 



II "Hollywood Fashions" are not sold in your community, 
send Photoplay Magazine your name and address and men- 
tion department store Irom which you buy ready-to-wear 



/%%*. 



If your home is in Baltimore, 
visit the interesting store 
of Hochschild, Kohn & 
Co. in December! For in 
the "Hollywood Fashions 
Corner," a modernistic 
setting recently added to 
the the Third Floor Apparel 
Shops, are exact copies of 
Fay Wray's fasinating tunic 
gown . . . as well as other 
"Hollywood Fashions," for 
January ... no less lovely! 





Ht:m 



$»i"i 



/fe^ 1 



TO 




*j 



...to me they're MILDER 
...to me they TASTE BETTER 




© 1934, Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 



PHO 



LAY 



CENTS 

ents in Canada 



FEBRUARY 




- 





,#** 



KAY 
FRANCIS 





t i 




Hollywood 



youthRomance 



sis 



LASKY S, 




***** „ ^" *«, °^- o. -^ 

***** , -^ ~ 4. - »** ^ ^ 4"* 

^ he ///, S - - rt 9e °^ 

**& , r y /a r 





^kfc. 



Photoplay Magazine for February, 1934 




Even his best 
friend wouldn't 

SAVE HIM! 




(Mostly boys in this picture, but the moral is for girls) WANT OTHERS TO LIKE YOU? 

Cjet rid of halitosis with 

LISTERINE 

Deodorizes hours longer 



Not for love or gold would any- 
body "cut in" and take little Enid 
off his hands. They were "on to 
her." Even his best friend, broke 
as only a college boy can be, had 
scorned his secret proffer of five 
dollars. Enid was his — all his — 
until the band played "Home, 
Sweet Home." The whole thing 
was pretty awful. But it was worse 
for Enid . . . For by the cruel 
grapevine, everyone in the room 
knew what her trouble was . . . 
knew why no one wanted to dance 
with her . . . why no one would 
ever want to dance with her .... 



How's your breath today? 

Halitosis (unpleasant breath) is 
the unforgivable social fault. Yet 
anybody, you included, is likely to 
have it. Ninety per cent of cases, 
say dental authorities, are caused 
by fermentation of tiny food par- 
ticles skipped by the tooth brush. 
Don't guess about your breath. 
Don't risk offending others need- 
lessly. Use Listerine and your 
breath will be pure, wholesome, 
and beyond reproach. Simply 
rinse the mouth with it every 
morning and every night, and be- 



tween times before social or business engagements. 
Listerine instantly conquers odors that ordinary 
mouth washes cannot hide in 12 hours. It imme- 
diately halts fermentation, the cause of odors, then 
gets rid of the odors themselves. When you want 
quick action and lasting deodorant effect, use only 
Listerine, the safe antiseptic. Lambert Pharmacal 
Company, St. Louis, Mo. 

NOW AT NEW LOW PRICES 



4 



Photoplay Magazine for February, 1934 



GflRI 



TRiumPHRnT RETimn 

TO THE SCREEfl 



J*\ 



GRETA GARBO in "Queen 
Christina" with John 
Gilbert, Ian Keith, Lewis 
Stone, Elizabeth Young, 
A Rouben Mamoulian 
Production, Associate 
Producer, Walter Wanger 



The Garbo thrill is b 
in your life! The Garbo 
beauty, the soul-stab- 
bing allure of the great- 
est screen personality of 
all time I Millions have 
waited, and they will 
be joyful that her first 
glorious entertainment 
"QUEEN CHRISTINA", 
a drama of exquisite 
passions, is unquestion- 
ably the most romantic 
story in which she has 
ever appeared. 



S 






METRO • GOLDWYN • MAYER 




OTO 




The World's Leading Motion Picture Publication 



Vol. XLV No. 3 



KATHRYN DOUGHERTY, Publisher 



February, 1934 



i 




Winners of Photoplay 
Magazine Gold Medal for 
the best picture of the year 

1920 

"HUMORESQUE" 

1921 

"TOL'ABLE DAVID" 

1922 

"ROBIN HOOD" 

1923 

"THE COVERED WAGON" 
"ABRAHAM" LINCOLN" 

1925 

"THE BIG PARADE" 

1926 

"BEAU GESTE" 

1927 

"7th HEAVEN" 

1928 

"FOUR SONS" 

1929 

"DISRAELI" 

1930 

"ALL QUIET ON THE 
WESTERN FRONT" 

1931 

"CIMARRON" 
i'SMILIN' THROUGH" 



Information and 
Service 

Brickbats and Bouquets ... 8 

Questions and Answers ... 90 

Hol'ywood Menus 102 

Addresses of the Stars . . . 120 

Hollywood Fashions .... 123 

Casts of Current Photoplays 124 



I 



High-Lights of This Issue 



Close-Ups and Long-Shots 

Undraping Hollywood 

Sylvia Gives Clara Bow Some Timely Advice 

Last Round-Up 

Cal York's Monthly Broadcast from Hollywood 

The Passing Show of '33 

Everybody's Stooging Now .... 
Seymour — Photoplay's Style Authority 
Who's in the Dog House Now? .... 
And Here We See the Real "Little Women" 

Drums in the Jungle 

Photoplay's Hollywood Beauty Shop 
Screen Memories from Photoplay . 



Kathryx Dougherty 

Ruth Rankin 

Syivia 

KlRTLEY BASKETTE 



Sara Hamilton 

KlRTLEY BASKETTE 



Ruth Rankin 

Virginia Maxwell 

Henry A. Phillips 

Carolyn Van Wycx 



25 
28 
34 
38 
46 
.50 
52 
61 
72 
74 
78 
81 
121 



Photoplay's Famous Reviews 

Brief Reviews of Current Pictures 6 

The Shadow Stage 56 

Personalities 

Esther Ralston 30 

The Power Behind the Hepburn Throne . . Wilbur Morse, Jr. 31 

" Can a Man Love Two Women at the Same Time? " Virginia Maxwell 32 

I Meet Miss Crawford Frazier Hunt 36 

John, the Great Charles Darntox 45 

Why I Quit Hollywood 

By Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., lx ax Interview with Kathlyx Hatdex 54 

Clara Bow 55 

Back of the West Front Dana Rush 60 

Two "Toughs" from the Chorus Ben Maddox 69 

Working Girl Kenneth Baker 70 

Al Jolson 71 

Madge Evans 76 

The Lady Who Laughed at Hollywood . . Wilbur Morse, Jr. 77 
On the Cover — Kay Francis — Painted by Earl Christy 



Published monthly by the Photoplay Publishing Co. 
Publishing Office, 919 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. Editorial Offices, 221 W. 57th St., New York City 

The International News Company, Ltd.. Distributing Agents, 5 Bream's Building, London, England 

Kathryn Dougherty, 

President and Treasurer 

John S. Tuomey, Vice-President Evelyn McEvilly, Secretary 

Yearly Subscription: $2.50 in the United States, its dependencies, Mexico and Cuba; $3.50 Canada; $3.50 for foreign countries. Remittances 

should be made by check, or postal or express money order. Caution — Do not subscribe through persons unknown to you. 

Entered as second-class matter April 24, 1912, at the Postoffice at Chicago, 111., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Copyright, 1934, by the Photoplay Publishing Company, Chicago 



Consult this pic- 
ture shopping 
guide and save 
your time, money 
and disposition 



Brief R 



eviews o 



f 



Current 1 ictures 



•+C Indicates photoplay was named as one of the best upon its month of review 



ACE OF ACES— RKO-Radio.— Richard Dix in a 
not-so-hot wartime aviation story. (Dec.) 

• ADORABLE — Fox. — Janet Gaynor in a gay. 
tuneful puff-ball about a princess in love with 
an officer of her army. Henry Garat's the officer — 
and he's a hit! Don't miss it. (.Aug.) 

AFTER TONIGHT— RKO-Radio.— Connie Ben- 
nett's a Russian spy in love with Austrian officer 
Gilbert Roland; fast, exciting. (Dec.) 

AGGIE APPLEBY, MAKER OF MEN— RKO- 
Radio. — Country-boy Charles Farrell is made into a 
tough mug by bad-lady Wynne Gibson. Bill Gargan. 
You'll laugh and like it. (Dec.) 

ANN CARVER'S PROFESSION— Columbia — 
Fay Wray shows her competence aside from horror 
stuff, as a successful lawyer married to Gene Ray- 
mond. Gene gets into trouble; Fay must save him. 
Acceptable entertainment. (Sept.) 

• ANN VICKERS— RKO-Radio.— Irene Dunne 
in a finely acted tale of a social worker who 
loves but doesn't marry. Walter Huston, Bruce 
Cabot. Strictly for sophisticates. (Dec.) 

• ANOTHER LANGUAGE — M-G-M. — A 
slow-moving but superbly acted story of a bride 
(Helen Hayes) misunderstood by the family of hubby 
Bob Montgomery. The late Louise Closser Hale 
plays the dominating mother. (Oct.) 

ARIZONA TO BROADWAY— Fox— Joan Ben- 
nett, Jimmie Dunn, and a good cast, wasted in a 
would-be adventure varn about slicking the slickers. 
(Sept.) 

AVENGER, THE— Monogram.— Adrienne Ames 
and Ralph Forbes wasted on this one. (Dec.) 

BEAUTY FOR SALE— M-G-M.— An amusing 
tale about the troubles of girls who work in a beauty 
shop. Una Merkcl, Alice- Brady, Madge Evans, 
Heclda Hopper, others. (Nov.) 

BED OF ROSES — RKO-Radio. — Ex-reform 
schoolgirls Connie Bennett and Pert Kelton out 
to beat life. Not for kiddies. (.4 ug.) 

BEFORE DAWN— RKO-Radio— Dorothy Wilson, 
a spiritualist, tries to help detective Stuart Erwin 
solve a murder mystery — in a haunted house! Not 
for the kiddies. (Jan.) 

BELOW THE SEA— Columbia.— A Fay Wray 
thriller; caught in a diving bell on a deep-seas ex- 
pedition this time. Diver Ralph Bellamy to the 
rescue. Good underseas shots and good fun. (Aug.) 

• BERKELEY SQUARE— Fox.— As subtly 
done as " Smilin' Through"; Leslie Howard 
thrown back among his 18th century ancestors. 
Heather Angel. (Sept.) 

BEST OF ENEMIES— Fox.— No great comeback 
for Buddy Rogers; he and Marian Nixon reconcile 
quarreling papas Frank Morgan and Joseph Caw- 
thorn. (Sept.) 

BIG BRAIN, THE— RKO-Radio.— Clever and 
fast, except in the climax. George E. Stone climbs 
from barber to phony stock magnate. Reginald 
Owen, Fay Wray. (Aug.) 

BIG EXECUTIVE— Paramount.— Ricardo Cor- 
tez. Richard Bennett, Elizabeth Young, wasted in 
another of these stock market tales. Weak story. 
(Oct.) 

BITTER SWEET— United Artists.— A Britisli 
musical, about a woman musician who lives on after 
her husband was killed defending her honor. It could 
have been stronger. (Nov.) 

G 



BLARNEY KISS, THE— British & Dominions- 
British restraint takes zip from this tale of an Irish- 
man who kisses the Blarney Stone, and then has great 
adventures in London. Well acted. (A" or.) 

BLIND ADVENTURE — RKO-Radio. — Ad- 
venturous Bob Armstrong tangled with Helen Mack, 
crooks, and a jovial burglar, Roland Young, in a 
London fog. But the plot is as badly befogged as the 
characters. (Oct.) 

• BLONDE BOMBSHELL. THE— M-G-M — 
(Reviewed under the title "Bombshell.") Jean 
Harlow superb in an uproarious comedy of Hollywood 
life. Press-agent Lee Tracy makes her the hot 
"Bombshell "; she wants to lead the simple life. (Dec.) 

BLOOD MONEY— 20th Century-United Artists. 
— Underworld bail bondsman George Bancroft falls 
in love with pretty Frances Dee and deserts his 
izangster friends who made him. Good suspense. 
(Jan.) 



FASHIONS 

No man can escape them 
and no woman wants to. 
You'll find this issue of 

Photoplay 

full of news about 

forthcoming styles 

and fashions. 



• BOWERY, THE — 20th Century-United 
Artists. — Grand fun while Wally Beery as 
Chuck Connors and George Raft as Steve Brodie 
battle for leadership of the Bowery in old days. 
Jackie Cooper, Fay Wray. Don't miss it. (Dec) 

BRIEF MOMENT— Columbia.— Night club 
singer Carole Lombard marries playboy Gene Ray- 
mond to reform him. It has snap and speed. (Nov.) 

BROADWAY THRU A KEYHOLE— 20th Cen- 
tury-United Artists. — Walter Winchell's melodrama 
of Gay White Way night life. Entertaining. (Dec.) 

• BROADWAY TO HOLLYWOOD— M-G-M. 
Frank Morgan, Alice Brady, others, in a finely- 
done life story of two vaudeville hoofers. No thrills, 
but supreme artistry. (A'oii.) 

BROKEN DREAMS — Monogram. — Buster 
Phelps shows how a little child can lead them; it's 
slightly hokey. (Dec.) 

BUREAU OF MISSING PERSONS— First Na- 
tional. — Good, stirring detective work by hard-boiled 
Pat O'Brien, directed by chief Lewis Stone. Bette 
Davis. (Nov.) 



CALLED ON ACCOUNT OF DARKNESS— 

Bryan Foy Prod. — This one has the themes, but not 
the punch, of some good baseball pictures. (Aug.) 

CAPTURED!— Warners.— Leslie Howard, Doug 
Fairbanks, Jr., captured aviators held by prison 
commander Paul Lukas. Fine acting; weak plot. 
(Sept.) 

CHANCE AT HEAVEN— RKO-Radio.— "Poor 
but noble" Ginger Rogers and rich Marian Nixon 
want Joel McCrea. Excellent playing makes this old 
plot highly appealing. (Dec.) 

CHARLIE CHAN'S GREATEST CASE— Fox. 

— Warner Oland in another delightful tale about the 
fat Chinese detective, and a double murder. Heather 
Angel. (Nov.) 

CHEATING BLONDES— Equitable Pictures — 
A would-be murder mystery and sexer; it's neither. 
Thelma Todd. (Aug.) 

CHIEF, THE— M-G-M.— Ed Wynn in a filmful of 
his nonsense that's good at times and at others not so 
good. (Dec.) 

CHRISTOPHER BEAN (Also released as "Her 
Sweetheart") — M-G-M. — Marie Dressier, Doc 
Lionel Barrymore's maid, gives you plenty of laughs 
when she helps daughter Helen Mack elope with 
Russell Hardie, much to the annoyance of Beulah 
Bondi, doctor's wife. See it. (Jan.) 

COCKTAIL HOUR— Columbia.— Bebe Daniels, 
scorning "steady" Randolph Scott, tries Europe 
and a fling at "free" life. Entertaining, if not out- 
standing. (Aug.) 

COLLEGE COACH— Warners.— Football as it 
is played and won by coach Pat O'Brien who buys 
talent to win at all costs, while Ann Dvorak, his 
neglected wife, finds romance with Lyle Talbot, 
football hero. Fast moving. (Jan.) 

COLLEGE HUMOR— Paramount.— Regulation 
movie college life. Jack Oakie as hero. Bing Crosby; 
Burns and Allen, Richard Arlen, Mary Kornman, 
good enough. (Sept.) 

COUGAR, THE KING KILLER— Sidney Snow 
Prod. — Life as the official panther catcher for the 
State of California; good animal stuff. (Aug.) 

CRADLE SONG — Paramount.— Just as charm- 
ing is Dorothea Wieck in this her first American 
picture as she was in "Maedchen in Uniform." 
The beautiful story of a nun who showers mother- 
love on a foundling. (Jan.) 

DANCE, GIRL, DANCE— Invincible.— Dancer 
Evalyn Knapp can't get along with vaudeville 
partner-husband Edward Nugent. But when she 
clicks in a night club, they make up. Entertaining. 
(Jan.) 

DANGEROUS CROSSROADS— Columbia — 

Chic Sale does the locomotive engineer in a railroad 
thriller. For confirmed hokum addicts and Chic 
Sale's followers. (Sept.) 

DAS LOCKENDE ZIEL (THE GOLDEN 

GOAL)— Richard Tauber Tonfilm Prod.— Richard 
Tauber, as village choir singer who attains grand 
opera fame. His singing is superb. English captions. 
(Sept.) 

DAY OF RECKONING, THE— M-G-M.— 
Richard Dix, Madge Evans, Conway Tearle, below 
par in an ancient tale of an embezzling cashier and a 
double-crossing friend. (Dec.) 

DELUGE — RKO-Radio.— Earthquakes, tidal 
waves, the end of the world provide the thrills here. 
Cast and story alike dwarfed by the catastrophes. 
( Nov.) 

[ PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 10 ] 



Photoplay Magazine for February, 1934 



7 








AL JOLSON KAY FRANCIS 

DICK POWELL DOLORES DEL RIO 

FIFID'ORSAY RICARDO CORTEZ 

GUY KIBBEE HUGH HERBERT 

RUTH DONNELLY ROBERT BARRAT 

MERNA KENNEDY HENRY KOLKER 

WONDER 



As new as the New Year is this latest 
musical sensation from Warner Bros.! 
Hailed by six nations as one of the most 
novel of all stage hits, now at last it 
comes to the screen, bringing with it an 
utterly different conception of pictures 
with music! All the flash and glamor of 
"Gold Diggers" and "Footlight Parade", 
pbs scores of surprise features! Your 
theatre will announce it soon as 
its most important attraction in years! 





Brilliant New Songs 
by "42nd Street's" 
Famous Com posers- 
AL DUBIN and 
HARRY WARREN 
A First Nat'l Picture 



1 he Audi 



lence 



lalks Back 




Those "Wild Boys of the Road" have touched the hearts of many readers. "How 
can these young children be re-claimed ? How will America solve this problem ?" 



THE $25 LETTER 

I think that moving pictures have been 
responsible for the good behavior of thousands 
of children. There is no greater incentive to 
a child than to be told that he may go to 
"the movies," if he is good. 

How often I have heard mothers say, 
"Jimmie, if you'll take care of the baby after 
school every day, I'll take you to the movies 
Friday night." Or by way of stepping up 
a child's rating in school, the father will re- 
mark with a knowing wink, "If your report 
card is good this month you may go and see 
that picture you were talking about." 

And they do learn how to behave! What 
a lesson in the observance of society manners. 
The only chance some children have to learn 
how to act properly. 

Mary Belle Walley, Butler, N. J. 

S 



LEE TRACY, old boy, you are the 
big news of the month! And pop- 
ular! Scores of letters have poured 
into PHOTOPLAY, demanding that 
you be reinstated, forthwith, into 
your stellar standing. 

It takes a kick like that to test the 
loyalty of your screen followers. And 
they are loyal, down to the last man — 
and the last tvoinan, too. 

We haven't room for all the letters 
defending you, Lee, but three typical 
ones tell the story. 

Nominations for Hollywood's 
"Ideal Couple" are coming fast. 
Movie-goers certainly know marital 
happiness when they see it. The 
hunt is on for others besides those 
named in this month's Brickbats and 
Bouquets. What's your nomination? 



When the audience speaks the stars and 
producers listen. We offer three prizes for 
the best letters of the month— $25, $10 and 
$5. Literary ability doesn't count. But 
candid opinions and constructive sugges- 
tions do. We must reserve the right to cut 
letters to fit space limitations. Address The 
Editor, PHOTOPLAY, 221 W. 57th St., 
New York City. 



THE $10 LETTER 

Recent newsreels have seemed to be excep- 
tionally good, certainly far better from the 
standpoint of photography and imagination 
than the average regular run feature film. 
Yet while actors and actresses are spread all 
over the newspapers and theater lobbies, one 
seldom sees an advertisement for a movie talk 
by Mr. Roosevelt or Mr. Litvinov. And as 
for action, the Pennsylvania coal strikes, the 
Cuban revolutions, the recent lynchings and 
National Guard maneuvers are far more excit- 
ing than the speediest Western or the hottest 
passion film. 

My point is simply this: More and better 
advertising of newsreels would bring money 
to the box-office. 

Howard Leonard, Asheville, N. C. 

THE $5 LETTER 

We hear much talk about "reality." But 
do we really want reality on the screen — the 
reality eighty per cent of us know? I love 
every inch of my home, but I have so much 
reality in my daily life that when I "step out" 
of an evening, I want to step into the land of 
make-believe. 

I want to live in dreamland for a while. I 
want to be made love to by Gary Cooper and 
Fredric March, and imagine / have the win- 
someness of Shearer, the sophistication of 
Dietrich, the lure of Loy, the appeal of Craw- 
ford — that I'm marrying a prince, that I live 
in just such a beautiful house. 

Don't we all? 

Anna Robinson, Tucson, Ariz. 

THE CASE OF LEE TRACY 

Hollywood fair-weather friendship reached a 
new high when Lee Tracy was fired. 

I am sure there are thousands of Tracy 
devotees who feel as I do — that his off-screen 
behavior has no effect whatsoever on the 
excellence of his pictures or on the enjoyment 
of them. 

His is the most exhilarating personality we 
have ever had; to see his pictures is the best 
tonic in the world. We just can't lose him 
from the screen! Photoplay, why not 
"Shoulder Arms" in his behalf? 

And to M-G-M I say: "If you didn't have 
Garbo and Gable, I'd never see another of 
your pictures, so 'elp me." 

A. C. Miller, Philadelphia, Penna. 

I have just read of Lee Tracy's dismissal 
from M-G-M due to a certain unfortunate 
incident that happened recently in Mexico. 
I am not sure how much truth can be attached 
to the story, as facts concerning the film 
world are often distorted in European news- 
papers. 

Lee has gained his vast army of followers 
by portraying characters that are anything 
but angelic, so his admirers are hardly inclined 
to worry if he proves himself not quite a 
saint off-screen. Tracy is unique, for sheer 
entertainment value he is unsurpassed, and 
while he continues to give us those dynamic, 
[ please turn to page 12 ] 



Photoplay Magazine for February, 1934 



[GOOD NUMBERS, 



"FOUR FRIGHTENED PEOPLE" 

Four frightened people fleeing into a tropical 
jungle to escape from a plague-ridden ship . . . 
shedding their good manners with their clothes 
. . . casting civilization aside, being once more, 
"Male and Female." The people— Claudette 
Colbert, Herbert Marshall, Mary Boland, 
William Gargan. The director— Cecil B. DeMille. 




Six riotous comedians, out for fun ... six lar- 
cenous picture -snatchers, stealing laughs from 
each other, six grand mirthmakers in a story 
made for mirth. The six— Charlie Ruggles and 
Mary Boland, W. C. Fields and Alison Skipworth, 
George Burns and Gracie Allen. The director 
Leo McCarey. 




"EIGHT GIRLS IN A BOAT" 

Eight lovely girls in a school where men 
were forbidden. Eight girls dreaming spring 
dreams ... a lover looked in at the window 
and then there were seven. The eighth girl — 
Dorothy Wilson . . . the lover — Douglas 
Montgomery. The director — Richard Wallace. 




t's 



PARAMOUNT PICTURE, it's the best show in town 



Brief Reviews of Current Pictures 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 6 



DER SOHN DER WEISSEN BERGE (THE 
SON OF THE WHITE MOUNTAINS)— Itala 
Film. — Luis Trenkcr, skiing hero, and cast do good 
work. But thejgorgeous Alpine views run away with 
this German-made film. (Jan.) 

• DESIGN FOR LIVING— Paramount.— Noel 
Coward's unconventional stage play of a 
triangle, involving two men (Fredric March and 
Gary Cooper) and a woman (Miriam Hopkins). 
Excellent. Sophisticated. (Jan.) 

DEVIL'S IN LOVE, THE— Fox.— A shopworn 
Foreign Legion story; but Victor Jory, Loretta Young, 
David Manners, Vivienne Osborne, save it with fine 
acting. (Oct.) 

DEVIL'S MATE— (Also released under title "He 
Knew Too Much") — Monogram. — A good melo- 
drama about a murderer who was murdered so he 
couldn't tell what he knew. (Oct.) 

DIE GROSSE ATTRAKTION ("THE BIG 

ATTRACTION")— Tobis-Tauber-Emelka, Prod.— 
Richard Tauber's singing lends interest to this Ger- 
man film. English subtitles. (Oct.) 

• DINNER AT EIGHT— M-G-M — Another 
"all star" affair; they're invited to dinner by 
Lionel Barrymore and wife Billie Burke. Sophisti- 
cated comedy follows. (A ug.) 

DISGRACED— Paramount.— Not a new idea in 
a carload of this sort of stuff. Mannikin Helen 
Twelvetrees; rich scamp Bruce Cabot; enough said. 
(Sept.) 



DOCTOR BULL— Fox.— Will Rogers brings per- 
sonality to the tale of a country doctor struggling 
with a community that misunderstands; mild, except 
for Will. (Nov.) 

DON'T BET ON LOVE— Universal.— So-so; 
Lew Ayres wild about race-horses; sweetheart Ginger 
Rogers feels otherwise. Ends well, after some race 
stuff. (Sept.) 

• DOUBLE HARNESS— RKO- Radio.— Scintil- 
lating sophistication, with Ann Harding wan- 
gling rich idler Bill Powell into marriage, and mak- 
ing him like it. (Sept.) 

DREI TAGE MITTELARREST (THREE DAYS 
IN THE GUARDHOUSE)— Allianz Tonfilm Prod. 
— Excellent comedy situations when the mayor's maid 
seeks the father of her child. German dialogue. (Aug.) 

• DUCK SOUP— Paramount.— The Four Marx 
Brothers get mixed up in a revolution in a 
mythical country— and boy, how they get mixed up! 
A riot of fun. (Jan.) 

EMPEROR JONES, THE— United Artists. 
The great Negro actor Paul Robeson, in a filming of 
his phenomenal stage success about a Pullman porter 
who won rulership of a Negro republic. (Dec.) 

ESKIMO — M-G-M. — A gorgeous picture of life in 
the Arctic, and Eskimos tangling with white man's 
law. Eskimo actors; a treat for .ill who like the un- 
usual. (Dec.) 



EVER IN MY HEART— Warners.— Barbara 
Stanwyck in a too-horrible tale about persecution of 
herself and hubby Otto Kruger as German-Americans 
during the World War. (Dec.) 

FAITHFUL HEART— Helber Pictures.— Not 
even Herbert Marshall and Edna Best could make 
anything of this. ( Nov.) 

FEMALE— First National.— Ruth Chatterton, 

who toys with men in her own motor company, melts 
before George Brent. Chatterton fine. (Jan.) 

FIDDLIN' BUCKAROO, THE— Universal.— Ken 
Maynard and horse Tarzan in a dull Western. (Sept.) 

FIGHTING PARSON, THE— Allied-First Divi- 
sion. — Hoot Gibson tries comedy, as a cowboy be- 
decked in the garb of a parson. Not exactly a comic 
riot, nor is it good Western. (Oct.) 

FLYING DEVILS, THE— RKO-Radio.— Jealous 
hubby Ralph Bellamy, owner of an air circus, tries 
to crash Eric Linden. Eric's brother, Bruce Cabot, 
sacrifices himself in air battle with Bellamy. (Aug.) 

• FOOTLIGHT PARADE— Warners— Not as 
much heart appeal as the earlier Ruby Keeler- 
Dick Powell "backstage" romances, but it has Jimmy 
Cagney. He's grand, and the specialty numbers are 
among the finest ever done. (Dec.) 

F. P. 1.— Fox-Gaumont British-UFA — A well- 
done and novel thriller, about a floating platform 
built for transatlantic airplanes. Conrad Veidt, 
Leslie Fenton, Jill Esmond. (Oct.) 

FORGOTTEN MEN— Jewel Prod.— Official war 
films from fourteen countries; nothing too strong to 
put in. Fine if you can stand seeing what really 
happened. (Aug.) 

FROM HEADQUARTERS— Warners.— A grip- 
ping murder mystery, showing real police methods for 
a change. (Dec.) 

GAMBLING SHIP— Paramount.— A good idea 
gone wrong; Cary Grant, Benita Hume, in a badly 
worked out gangster piece. (Aug.) 

• GOLD DIGGERS OF 1933— Warners — 
Another and even better "42nd Street," with 
Ruby Keeler, Dick Powell, Joan Blondell. in charge 
of the fun. A wow musical. (Aug.) 

GOLDEN HARVEST — Paramount. — Farmer 
Dick Arlen grows wheat; brother Chester Morris is a 
Board of Trade broker; a farmers' strike brings the 
climax. A strong film. (Dec.) 

GOOD COMPANIONS, THE— Fox-Gaumont- 
British. — A mildly pleasing English tale of trouping 
in the provinces. (Dec.) 

GOODBYE AGAIN— Warners.— Good, if not 
howling, farce. Author Warren William pursued by 
ex-sweetie Genevieve Tobin; he's for Joan Blondell. 
(Sept.) 

GOODBYE LOVE — RKO-Radio. — Charlie 
Ruggles in a would-be comedy that's really a messy 
mixture of unsavory material. (Dec.) 



GUN JUSTICE — Universal. (Reviewed under 
the title "Rider of Justice.") — Ken Maynard shows 
up in the nick of time to save the pretty girl's ranch 
in Arizona. The same old hokum. (Jan.) 

• HAVANA WIDOWS— First National.— Joan 
Blondell, Glenda Farrell and Guy Kibbee in a 
rollicking comedy. A climax that will tickle vour 
risibilities. Good fun. (Jan.) 

HE KNEW TOO MUCH— Monogram.— Also re- 
leased as "Devil's Mate." See review under that 
title. (Oct.) 

HEADLINE SHOOTER— RKO-Radio.— News- 
reel man William Gargan rescues reporter Frances 
Dee, in an acceptable thriller with a new twist. 
(Sept.) 

HELL AND HIGH WATER— Parmount— Dick 
Arlen, owner of a garbage scow, falls heir to a babv 
and a girl (Judith Allen) at the same time. Dick 
fine; story poor. (Jan.) 

HELL'S HOLIDAY— Superb Pictures— Another 
assemblage of official war film — with the usual anti- 
war conversation added. Otherwise, acceptable and 
interesting. (Oct.) 

HER BODYGUARD— Paramount.— Showgirl 
Wynne Gibson's so pestered, she hires Eddie Lowe 
as bodyguard. Good enough fun from there on. 
(Sept.) 

• HER FIRST MATE— Universal.— ZaSu Pitts 
tries to make a big time mariner out of Slim 
Summerville who's supposed to be first mate, but 
who is really selling peanuts, on the Albany night 
boat. Una Merkel helps scramble up the hilariously 
funny plot. (Oct.) 

HEROES FOR SALE— First National.— Boo 
hoo! It's just too awful — all that happens to ex- 
soldier Dick Barthelmess! (Aug.) 

HIS PRIVATE SECRETARY— Showmens Pic- 
tures. — An Evalyn Knapp romance with John Wayne. 
Distinctly better than most films in which Evalyn 
has appeared. (Oct.) 

HOLD ME TIGHT— Fox.— Another Jimmie 
Dunn-Sally Eilers opus, poor boy besting'the villain, 
they live happily, etc. (Aug.) 

• HOLD YOUR MAN— M-G-M.— Clark Gable 
and Jean Harlow; both crooked to start, both 
go straight for love. Not another "Red Dust," but 
good enough. (Sept.) 

HOOPLA — Fox. — Clara Bow as a carnival dancer. 
Love interest, Richard Cromwell, whom Clara is 
paid to vamp — and does she like it? Story so-so. 
(Jan.) 

• HOUSE ON 56TH STREET, THE— Warn- 
ers. — After twenty years' unjust imprison- 
ment, Kay Francis' life means little to her. Then it 
is her lot to save daughter Margaret Lindsay from 
a similar fate. Ricardo Cortez and Gene Raymond. 
(Jan.) 

I HAVE LIVED— Chesterfield.— Alan Dinehart. 
Anita Page, others, help this obvious tale about a 
playwright and a woman of easy virtue. (Nov.) 



Photoplays Reviewed in the Shadow Stage This Issue 

Save this magazine — refer to the criticisms before you pic\ out your evening's entertainment. Ma\e this your reference list. 



Page 
Advice to the Lovelorn — 20th Century- 
United Artists 106 

Alice in Wonderland — Paramount 57 

As Husbands Go — Fox 106 

Beloved — Universal 56 

Big Shakedown, The — First National. . 107 

Big Time or Bust — Tower Prod 107 

Bombay Mail — Universal 59 

By Candlelight — Universal 58 

Convention City — First National 58 

Counsellor-At-Law — Universal 56 

Dancing Lady — M-G-M 56 

Dark Hazard — First National 58 

East of Fifth Avenue — Columbia 106 

Easy Millions — Freuler Film 106 



Page 
Eat 'Em Alive— Real Life Pictures. ... 107 
Farewell to Love — Associated Sound 

Film 107 

Frontier Marshal — Fox 106 

Gallant Lady — 20th Century-United 

Artists 57 

Girl Without a Room — Paramount. . . . 106 

He Couldn't Take It — Monogram 106 

Her Splendid Folly — Hollywood Pic- 
tures 106 

Hold the Press — Columbia 106 

Horseplay — Universal 106 

If I Were Free— RKO-Radio 59 

Jimmy and Sally — Fox 58 

Lady Killer — Warners 59 



Page 

Master of Men — Columbia 59 

Mr. Skitch— Fox 59 

Right to Romance, The— RKO-Radio. 58 
Roman Scandals — Samuel Goldwyn- 

United Artists 57 

Sitting Pretty — Paramount 58 

Smoky — Fox 106 

Thundering Herd, The — Paramount. . . 106 
Wine, Women and Son — Monogram . . . 107 
Woman Who Dared, The — Wm. Berke 

Prod 106 

Women in His Life, The— M-G-M .... 106 
You Made Me Love You — Majestic 

Pictures 59 



10 



Photoplay Magazine for February, 1934 



I I 



• I LOVED A WOMAN -First National— Ed- 
ward G. Robinson, as a rich Chicago meat- 
packer, finds his life torn between wife Genevieve 
Tobin and opera singer Kay Francis. Excellent and 
"different." (Nov.) 

I LOVED YOU WEDNESDAY— Fox.— Life and 

loves of dancer Elissa Landi. Victor Jory throws her 
over; Warner Baxter loves her. Pleasant; not grip- 
ping. (Sept.) 

• I'M NO ANGEL.— Paramount. — It's Mae 
West, and how! Sizzling, wise-cracking. This 
one simply wows audiences. There's Cary Grant, but 
Mae's all you'll see. (Dec.) 

INVISIBLE MAN, THE— Universal.— Shivery, 
this H. G. Wells tale, in which newcomer Claude 
Rains makes himself invisible — and then loses his 
reason. A creepy, but compelling picture. (Jan.) 

IT'S GREAT TO BE ALIVE— Fox.— Perhaps 
squirrels who see this will think so; most audiences 
won't. Herbert Mundin, Edna May Oliver help 
some. (Sept.) 



JENNIE GERHARDT — Paramount. — Sylvia 
Sidney's grand acting saves a slow telling of the 
Dreiser tale about a girl who, unwedded, loved her 
man throughout life. (Aug.) 

KENNEL MURDER CASE, THE— Warners.— 
William Powell in another Philo Vance murder mys- 
tery; smoothly done and entertaining. (Dec.) 



KING FOR A NIGHT— Universal.— Chester 
Morris, a swell-headed, though likable prize-fighter, 
stands the consequences for something sister Helen 
Twelvetrees has done. Exciting. (Jan.) 



LADIES MUST LOVE— Universal.— A "gold-dig- 
ger" partnership breaks up when June Knight really 
falls for Neil Hamilton. Thin, but it has good spots. 
(Nov.) 



• LADY FOR A DAY— Columbia.— Apple- 
woman May Robson thought a society dame 
by her daughter; a stage crowd throws a party to 
save the day. Fine fun. (Sept.) 

LAST TRAIL, THE — Fox. — A Zane Grey- 
Western with racketeers instead of rustlers, and speed 
cops in place of cowbovs. The changes don't help it. 
(Oct.) 

LAUGHING AT LIFE— Mascot Pictures.— A 
well-done Richard Harding Davis type of tale about 
soldier of fortune Victor McLaglen raising cain in a 
banana republic. (.4 ug.) 

LIFE IN THE RAW— Fox.— George O'Brien and 
Claire Trevor in a Western enriched with new ideas. 
(Oct.) 

• LITTLE WOMEN— RKO- Radio.— This clas- 
sic is exquisitely transferred to the screen. 
Katharine Hepburn, as Jo is sky-rocketed to greater 
film heights. Joan Bennett, Frances Dee and Jean 
Parker, as Jo's sisters, give spendid performances. 
(Jan.) 



LONE AVENGER, THE— World Wide.— The big 
bank robbery is the burden of this Ken Maynard 
Western. Youngsters won't be disappointed. (Sept.) 



LONE COWBOY— Paramount.— Without Jackie 
Cooper there wouldn't be much of a picture. Jackie's 
sent West to comfort his dead father's pal embittered 
by his wife's (Lila Lee) faithlessness. (Jan.) 



LOVE, HONOR AND OH, BABY!— Universal. 
— (Reviewed under the title "Sue Me.") Shyster 
lawyer Slim Summerville tries to frame ZaSu Pitts' 
sugar-daddv. Riotouslv funnv, after a slow start. 

( Nov.) 



• MAD GAME, THE— Fox.— Spencer Tracy, 
imprisoned beer baron, is released to catch a 
kidnaper. He loves the assignment — after what the 
kidnaper did to him. Love interest, Claire Trevor. 
Well acted. Not for children. (Jan.) 



• MAMA LOVES PAPA— Paramount— Lowly 
Charlie Ruggles is made park commissioner; 
involved with tipsy society dame Lilyan Tashman. 
Great clowning. (Sept.) 



MAN OF THE FOREST— Paramount.— Far from 
being a topnotch Western. Randolph Scott, Verna 
Hillie, Noah Beery. Good work done by a mountain 
lion. (Sept.) 



MAN'S CASTLE — Columbia. — A deeply moving 
tale of vagabond Spencer Tracy and his redemption 
by Loretta Young's love. (Dec.) 

[ PLEASE TUEX TO PAGE 15 ] 




' B.O." GON E good times ahead! 



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News and Views from 




[ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 8 ] 

clever performances, we who have learned to 
appreciate his superb artistry can easily over- 
look this unfortunate occurrence. 

M-G-M, hadn't you better reconsider your 
decision and grab Lee back before another 
studio takes advantage of your mistake? We 
cannot do without him. He is our favorite 
depression chaser. 

Vive la 7 racy! 

Lilian Warren, London, England 

The Lee Tracy episode is regrettable. 

Mr. Tracy has repeatedly and vehemently 
denied imbibing too freely of the "cup that 
cheers," but the implication becomes a self- 
evident fact, since only one in an extremely 
befuddled state could so far forget himself. 
A newspaper paragrapher, waxing a bit face- 
tious on the subject, says, "Mr. Tracy un- 
doubtedly holds the world record for 'per- 
sonal' appearance!" 

Mr. Mayer, in justice to the industry and 
himself, could do no less than he has done 
toward disciplining the recalcitrant Tracy; 
but it is to be hoped that his dismissal from 
films will not be permanent, for the screen 
would thus lose one of its most capable and 
popular stars. 

Mrs. W. P. Jackson, Columbia, Tenn. 

ANNA "ON THE SPOT"? 

If ever a star was put "on the spot" that 
star is Anna Sten. The public has been 
informed, through advance publicity on her 
first American picture, " Nana," that the 
Russian importation will push Garbo, Dietrich 
and the other exotics off the screen. 

12 



"Only Yesterday," with Margaret Sul- 
lavan, from the New York stage, and 
the personable John Boles, has brought 
in a perfect raft of reader commenda- 
tion. They recognize Margaret's ability 



Will Anna Sten prove to be the star find 
of 1934? Another Hepburn springing into 
fame overnight? Let's hope she is. 

F. James Ross, Rutland, Vt. 

"WILD BOYS OF THE ROAD" 

On the screen before me was pictured dar- 
ingly, dramatically, realistically, the actual 
lives of the half million boys who wander over 
America — living in tramp "jungles," sewer- 
pipe "cities," and subway "hotels," stealing 
to live. "How long before they live to 
steal?" I asked myself. "How can these 
young children be reclaimed? How will Amer- 
ica solve this problem? 

The picture brought a tear to the eye and 
a tug to the heart! History already made! 
Not far-fetched, not feverish, not Hollywood- 
ian — just plain, unadulterated history! 

Based as it is on authentic facts obtained 
from a reporter who actually lived among 
these children, it is the duty of every public- 
spirited father and mother, or brother and 
sister, whose interest in the welfare of children 
goes beyond their own hearthstones, to see 
"Wild Boys of the Road," and reflect long and 
seriously. 

M. C. Jones, New York, N. Y. 

A PEACH OF A PAIR 

"Only Yesterday" can be understood and 
appreciated by all. It was a relief to see such 
a film. 

Margaret Sullavan is a real and genuine 
actress. Mr. Boles' performance is superb. 

Here's to another Sullavan and Boles pic- 
ture real soon! 

Bernadeth Nelson, Beverly Hills, Calif. 

AGAIN IT'S SULLAVAN 

Margaret Sullavan is a star of genuine 
brilliance. Her work in "Only Yesterday" 
proved that. 

Yesterday only a name. Yesterday only a 
face in the crowd, but today the darling of 




"We loved Jean Harlow as 'The Blonde Bombshell,' but oh, you Tracy !" 
That lad's mail is going to break the postman's back. It grows daily 



All Parts of the Globe 



the screen. Yesterday only a voice, but today 
a thrilling personality. 

This beautiful, sensitive love story is played 
by one of the finest casts ever assembled for 
a single film. 

Mrs. William Figy, New Glarus, Wis. 

WE CHEER, TOO! 

I have just seen "The Blonde Bombshell," 
and what a knockout! 

It is about the fastest-moving picture that 
I ever expect to see. 

Here's three cheers for Jean Harlow and 
Lee Tracy for entertaining performances. 
Elcy Oberdick, Leavenworth, Kansas 

"THE PERFECT LOVE PAIR" 

Who was it that said, "Let's choose a per- 
manent perfect love pair for Hollywood, and 
make it one with a child?" Immediately 
Bebe and Ben Lyon pop into my mind! Why 
not trust them to that honorable position? 
Dortha V. Buxz, Indianapolis, Ind. 

IT'S THE HAROLD LLOYDS 

In the December issue of Photoplay i 
noticed a letter entitled "Cast Your Vote," 
and I am taking advantage of that. 

I believe the Harold Lloyds are Hollywood's 
ideal couple. 

Martha A. Singleton, Hope, Ark. 

NO, IT'S JOHN AND DOLORES 

I say that John and Dolores Barrymore ?•• 
the ideal couple. One never hears of John 
tripping about "alone." 

Marian Martin, Chicago, 111. 

HOW AROUT HERRERT AND EDNA? 

As to the "Ideal Couple of Hollywood" — 
my vote goes to Herbert Marshall and Edna 
Best. 

M. K., San Antonio, Texas 




Here she is.' Jeanette MacDonald. 
One reader's choice for the title role 
in M-G-M's "The Merry Widow." A 
coveted part, worthy of the acknowl- 
edged musical talent of this fine actress 




Maurice has added painting to his arts. In "The Way to Love," M. Chevalier 
does a study of Casanova, the dog, while Edward Everett Horton looks on 



MY MERRY WIDOW 

M-G-M is searching for someone to play the 
feminine lead in "The Merry Widow," when 
all the time they have the Merry Widow on 
their own lot. It's Jeanette MacDonald, of 
course. There could be no better choice for 
the part. Who but Miss MacDonald could 
play that gay, charming woman? 

Gertrude Klein, New York, N. Y. 

A GLOBE TROTTER 

"Better than a college education" is my 
slogan for the movies. 

By diligence, the movie devotee may be- 
come an accomplished linguist, traveler, ex- 
plorer or messieur de affaires. 

With "Trader Horn," I stalked big game 
in Africa; "Rasputin" saw me with the 
Russian Cossacks; I was "A Fugitive from a 
Chain Gang" with Paul Muni. I was a gal- 
lant Romeo in a hundred others. But I need 
not go on. 

Like a bee on a flower, I extract the nectar 
from the motion picture — which is truly the 
flower of American entertainment! 

Frank R. Moore, Detroit, Mich. 



"THE WAY TO LOVE" 

Chevalier sings! And acts! It's a picture 
with a thrill, and with plenty of pep, too. 

That happy-go-lucky air of Chevalier's just 
seems to "get" people. 

There is but one Chevalier — and there'll 
never be another! 

Ruth Kohnmann, Memphis, Term. 
[ please turn to page 14 ] 

13 



1 he Audience lalks Back 




A SIGNAL HONOR 

Few there are in all Hollywood as deserving 
of the birthday reception tendered Marie 
Dressier. In an age when youth is very much 
in the ascendancy, it is gratifying that one who 
is mellowed by sixty-two years of life should 
be toasted and acclaimed as Marie was on her 
natal day. Time cannot dim her enthusiasm 
nor age destroy her vigor and personality. 

Joseph B. Sinclair, San Francisco, Calif. 

BORN ACTORS? 

Seeing Paul Robeson in "Emperor Jones" 
has confirmed a pet theory I have long held — 
namely, that the Negro is a natural-born actor. 
His innate feeling for the dramatic, his strong 
exhibitionist tendency and his facile, easily- 
played-upon surface emotions make him ideally 
suited for acting. The capacity for quickly 
aroused, superficial laughter or tears make him 
equally competent to portray a character that 
is hilariously funny or appealingly pathetic. 
Irene M. Woodruff, Charlestown, Mass. 

ABOUT OUR "ANGEL" 

I think Mae West is the greatest thing on 
the screen — but please don't every actress 
start wiggling her hips, wearing Mae West 
gowns, and carrying a parasol. We like you 
for your own charming characteristics, and not 
something adopted from someone else. 

Besides, by the time you all acquire Mae's 
characteristics she will have started something 
new — and there you will be (holding the bag, 
so to speak), wiggling your hips and saying 
"Come up sometime." 

Hulda Hoglund, Oakland, Calif. 

SOUP AND "NUTS" 

Whoops! Bang! Wow! And why not? 
Yes, you've guessed it. The Marx Brothers 
are in town. 

Put down your knitting, Grandma, and 
help find Junior's mittens, because we're all 
going to town and have "Duck Soup." 

Dorothy Barrett, Staples, Minn. 



As royal subjects eagerly await their 
queen, so do Garbo's devotees antici- 
pate the coming of her film, "Queen 
Christina," to the nation's screens 



[ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 13 ] 

THANK YOU 

Photoplay stands alone as a reliable and 
unprejudiced guide for any family that cannot 
afford to spend time or money on pictures that 
do not interest them. 

In our home we rely confidently on its good 
judgment. 

B. Warwick, Chatham, Ont., Canada 

ALL HAIL! 

Hail to the Queen! A royal role for the 
reigning monarch of filmdom. In anticipa- 
tion of a glorious array of regal splendor, do I 
await the coming of "Queen Christina." 
Garbo has won our hearts by the magnificence 
of her performances in the past. But the near 
future promises the climax. 

As the magnanimous Christina of Sweden, 
she should be superb. It is a natural, and 
Greta will not fail. 

Joy Reynolds, Chicago, HI. 




Every kind of question is coming in about Harpo of "Duck Soup." Tell us the 
secret of your charm, Mr. Marx. The ladies certainly seem to love you 



U 



Photoplay Magazine for February, 1934 



Brief Reviews of 
Current Pictures 

[ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 11 ] 



• MAN WHO DARED, THE— Fox.— Life story 
of the l?te Mayor Cermak of Chicago, from an 
immigrant boy in a coal mine to his assassination at 
the side of President Roosevelt. Fine cast, Preston 
Foster in the lead. (Oct.) 

MARY STEVENS, M.D.— Warners.— Slow tale 
of two doctors (Kay Francis, Lyle Talbot) who love, 
have a baby, but won't marry. (Sept.) 

• MAYOR OF HELL, THE— Warners.— Gang- 
ster Jimmy Cagney steps into a tough reform 
school, and with help of inmate Frankie Darro, makes 
things hum. Madge Evans. (Aug.) 

MEET THE BARON— M-G-M — Jack Pearl's 
film version of his radio nonsense about Baron Mun- 
chausen. Grand support; often hilarious. (Dec.) 

MELODY CRUISE — RKO-Radio. — Playboy 
Charlie Ruggles has girl trouble on a cruise. Good 
music; plot falls apart. (Aug.) 

MIDNIGHT CLUB— Paramount.— George Raft 
plays crook to catch chief crook Clive Brook, but falls 
in love with Helen Vinson, one of the gang. Not as 
good as the grand cast suggests it should be. (Oct.) 

MIDNIGHT MARY— M-G-M.— Loretta Young 
does a better than usual gun moll; she shoots big-shot 
Ricardo Cortez to save lawyer Franchot Tone for the 
plot. (A ug.) 

MIDSHIPMAN JACK— RKO-Radio.— A color- 
ful story of Annapolis and a careless midshipman who 
makes good. Bruce Cabot, Betty Furness, Frank 
Albertson, others. (Dec.) 

• MOONLIGHT AND PRETZELS— Univer- 
sal. — Leo Carrillo, Lillian Miles, Roger Pryor, 
Mary Brian, in a musical. Familiar theme but ex- 
cellent numbers. ( Nov.) 

MORGENROT (DAWN).— UFA.— An excellent 
German film about submarine warfare. English pro- 
logue and captions. (Aug.) 

• MORNING GLORY, THE— RKO-Radio.— 
Katharine Hepburn at her superb best in a 
story of a country girl determined to make good on 
the stage. Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., Adolphe Menjou, 
Mary Duncan. (Oct.) 

MY LIPS BETRAY— Fox.— A musical comedy 
kingdom in which cabaret singer Lilian Harvey falls 
in love with king John Boles, and is loved by him. 
El Brendel. Fair. (Jan.) 

MY WOMAN— Columbia.— Wally Ford gets a 
radio break when his wife, Helen Twelvetrees, vamps 
Victor Jory into the idea. But success goes to Wally 's 
head; he loses his job — and his wife. (Jan.) 

• MY WEAKNESS— Fox.— Lilian Harvey as a 
Cinderella coached by Lew Ayres to catch his 
rich uncle's son, Charles Butterworth. Charles is a 
riot. (Dec.) 

MYRT AND MARGE— Universal.— Two popular 
radio stars do their stuff for the movies; an amusing 
little musical. (Nov.) 

NARROW CORNER, THE— Warners.— Doug 
Fairbanks, Jr., in a lugubrious tale of evil passions in 
the South Seas. Fine acting, fine cast, but a dark 
brown after-taste. (Aug.) 

NIGHT AND DAY— Gaumont-British— Mixed 
music and melodrama, done in leisurely British 
fashion; the mixture doesn't jell. (Aug.) 



• NIGHT FLIGHT— M-G-M— All star cast, 
with two Barrymores, Helen Hayes, Robert 
Montgomery. Myrna Loy, Clark Gable, others. Not 
much plot, but gripping tension and great acting, as 
night flying starts in the Argentine. (Nov.) 



NO MARRIAGE TIES— RKO-Radio.— Richard 
Dix as a brilliant sot who makes good in advertising, 
with Elizabeth Allan clinging to him. Good Dix 
stuff. (Sept.) 

OLSEN'S BIG MOMENT— Fox.— El Brendel is 
not only a janitor, but a matchmaker and a caretaker 
for an intoxicated bridegroom. Plenty of laughs. 
Walter Catlett and Barbara Weeks. (Jan.) 







[ PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 16 ] 



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Brief Reviews of Current Pictures 



[ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 15 



• ONE MAN'S JOURNEY— RKO-Radio.— 
Lionel Barrymore struggles from obscurity to 
universal esteem as a self-sacrificing, conscientious 
country doctor. May Robson, David Landau, Joel 
McCrea, others, in support. (Nov.) 



ONE SUNDAY AFTERNOON — Paramount — 
Dentist Gary Cooper suddenly finds his life-long 
enemy in his dental chair, at his mercy, and thinks 
back over it all. Direction could have done better 
with cast and story. ( Nov.) 



ONE YEAR LATER— Allied.— Melodrama that 
turns a slow start into a good finish. Mary Brian 
and Donald Dillaway. (Oct.) 

• ONLY YESTERDAY— Universal.— It's a hit 
for Margaret Sullavan in the role of a girl who 
kept the secret of her unwise love from her lover, 
John Boles, for many years. Splendid direction. 
(Jan.) 



OVER THE SEVEN SEAS— William K. Vander- 
bilt. — Mr. Vanderbilt'sfilmsof his journey around the 
world, gathering marine specimens. Some wonderful 
color photography. (A ug.) 



• PADDY, THE NEXT BEST THING— Fox- 
Janet Gaynor in a whimsical, delightful story 
of an Irish madcap girl who doesn't want big sister 
Margaret Lindsay forced to marry rich planter 
Warner Baxter. (Nov.) 



•PENTHOUSE— M-G-M — Standard melodrama 
about a "high life" murder, but thrillingly done 
by Warner Baxter, C. Henry Gordon, Myrna Loy, 
Phillips Holmes, Mae Clarke, and others. (Nov.) 



PICTURE BRIDES— Allied.— Scarlet sisters, 
diamond miners, and not much else. (Dec.) 



POIL DE CAROTTE (THE RED HEAD)— 

Pathe-Natan. — Redhead Robert Lynen splendid as 
the lonely boy who tries to hang himself. English 
captions. (Sept.) 



POLICE CALL— Showmens Pictures.— Wild ad- 
ventures in Guatemala; a mediocre film. (Nov.) 

POLICE CAR 17— Columbia.— Tim McCoy, in a 
radio squad car. chases a crook, and winds up in 
marriage with Evalyn Knapp, daughter of the police 
lieutenant. Just so-so. (Jan.) 



POWER AND THE GLORY, THE— Fox- 
Ralph Morgan relates the life story of his friend the 
railroad president (Spencer Tracy). Colleen Moore 
"comes back" in this. Unusual and good. (Sept.) 



• PRIVATE LIFE OF HENRY VIII, THE— 
London Film-United Artists. — Charles Laugh- 
ton superb and also gorgeously funny as the royal 
Bluebeard; photography is inspired. (Dec.) 



• PRIZEFIGHTER AND THE LADY, THE 
— M-G-M. — With Myrna Loy to make love to, 
and Camera to fight. Max Baer is the hero of one of 
the best ring pictures yet made. He'll challenge any 
lady-killer now. (Jan.) 



SAVAGE GOLD— Harold Auten Prod.— A cork- 
ing travel film, showing the Jivaro Indians of the 
upper Amazon. You'll see human heads shrunk to 
the size of oranges, among other gruesome thrills. 
(Oct.) 



SECRET OF THE BLUE ROOM, THE— Uni- 
versal. — Well-sustained melodrama about a sealed 
and deadly room. Gloria Stuart, William Janney, 
Paul Lukas, Onslow Stevens. (Sept.) 



SHANGHAI MADNESS— Fox.— Melodrama in 
China; Spencer Tracy, Eugene Pallette, Fay Wray, 
better than the story. ( Nov.) 



SHE HAD TO SAY YES— First National — 
Loretta Young, cloak-and-suit model, must be agree- 
able to out-of-town buyers. Gets all tangled in its 
own plot. (A ug.) 



SHEPHERD OF SEVEN HILLS, THE— Faith 
Pictures. — A finely done camera visit to the Vatican, 
with scenes showing Pope Pius XI. (Ncn 1 .) 



MOVIE NEWS! 

Let old Cal York tell you 

what's going on in and 

about Hollywood 



CaPs the best - informed 
gossip scribe in town. 
So, for authentic news, 
read his columns in every 
issue of 

Photoplay 



SHOULD LADIES BEHAVE?— M-G-M— (Re- 
viewed under title "The Vinegar Tree.") — Mary 
Carlisle won't listen to reason when her parents, Alice 
Brady and Lionel Barrymore. try to keep her from 
marrying suave Conway Tearle. Amusing. (Jan.) 



SILK EXPRESS, THE— Warners.— Good melo- 
drama; crooks try to stop a silk shipment from Japan. 
Neil Hamilton; fine support. (A Kg.) 



SON OF A SAILOR— First National.— Joe E 
Brown has a weakness for gold braid and pretty girls 
including Thelma Todd. Good, clean fun. (Jan.) 

SONG OF SONGS, THE— Paramount.— A once- 
thrilling classic about artist-model Marlene Dietrich, 
deserted by artist Brian Aherne, and married to 
blustering baron Lionel Atwill. Charming; not stir- 
ring. (Sept.) 

S. O. S. ICEBERG — Universal.— Thrilling and 
chilling adventure adrift on an iceberg; marvelous 
rescue flying. (Dec.) 

SPECIAL INVESTIGATOR — Universal. — 
Onslow Stevens and Wynne Gibson are rounded up 
as murder suspects. When things look darkest, 
Wynne saves the day. Too mystifying to be easily 
followed. (Jan.) 



SPHINX, THE— Monogram.— Excellent melo- 
drama, with Lionel Atwill as chief chill-giver; Theo- 
dore Newton, Sheila Terry, Paul Hurst, Luis Alberni. 
(Aug.) 



STAGE MOTHER— M-G-M.— Alice Brady and 
Maureen O'Sullivan in an "ambitious mother and 
suppressed daughter" tale; Alice Brady's great work 
keeps it from being boring. (Dec.) 



• STORM AT DAYBREAK— M-G-M.— Kay 
Francis and Nils Asther two unwilling points 
of a triangle, with Serbian mayor Walter Huston 
as the third. A powerful story of war days in Sara- 
jevo. (Sept.) 



STRANGE CASE OF TOM MOONEY, THE— 

First Division. — Nevvsreel material showing Mooney's 
side of this noted case. Effectively done. (Oct.) 



STRANGER'S RETURN, THE— M-G-M.— The 
folks secretly detest rich, crotchety farmer Lionel 
Barrymore — all except city granddaughter Miriam 
Hopkins. Grand "back to the farm" feeling; 
superb acting. (Sept.) 



STRAWBERRY ROAN— Universal.^Ken May- 
nard and Ruth Hall good; but the horses are so fine, 
humans weren't needed. An exceptional Western. 
(Dec.) 



STUDY IN SCARLET, A— World Wide.— Has 
Reginald Owen as Sherlock Holmes, but Conan Doyle 
wouldn't know the story. Fair. (Aug.) 



SUNSET PASS— Paramount.— A Western that is 
one — fine cast, fine action, gorgeous scenery. Worth 
anyone's time. (A ug.) 

SWEETHEART OF SIGMA CHI, THE— Mono- 
gram. — Buster Crabbe and Mary Carlisle ornament 
an otherwise so-so tale of college life. (Dec.) 



SYAMA — Carson Prod. — The elephant doings 
here might have made a one-reel short; otherwise, 
there's nothing. ( Nov.) 



TAKE A CHANCE — Paramount. — Tent-show 
crooks James Dunn and Cliff Edwards try to build 
up June Knight for Broadway. Lilian Bond and 
Buddy Rogers. Excellent musical numbers. (Jan.) 



• PROFESSIONAL SWEETHEART — RKO- 
Radio. — Ginger Rogers in a patchily done but 
funny skit about a radio "purity girl" who's hot-cha 
at heart. Fine comic support. (Aug.) 

OUATORZE JUILLET ("JULY 14")— Protex 
Pictures. — A taxi driver and a girl enjoy the French 
national holiday together. The comedy can be better 
appreciated by those who know French. Fair. (Jan.) 



• RAFTER ROMANCE — RKO-Radio. — 
Scrambled plot, but good fun. Two down-and- 
out youngsters (Ginger Rogers and Norman Foster) 
sent to live in the attic because they can't pay the rent. 
Unknown to each other, they meet on the outside. 
Then the fun begins. (Oct.) 



RETURN OF CASEY JONES, THE— Mono- 
gram. — A disjointed railroad melodrama. (Sept.) 



SATURDAY'S MILLIONS— Universal.— Foot- 
ball hero Robert Young thinks the game a racket, but 
finds it isn't. Bright and fast. (Dec.) 



SING SINNFR SING — Majestic Pictures. — 
Torch singer Leila Hyams tries to reform hubby 
Don Dillaway. Paul Lukas, George Stone also in 
cast. So-so. (Oct.) 



SKYWAY — Monogram. — A humdrum thriller 
about an airplane pilot, played by newcomer Ray 
Walker. (Oct.) 



SLEEPLESS NIGHTS— Remington Pictures.— 
The old farce idea of a man and girl supposed to be 
married, and thrust into bedrooms accordingly; but 
it's better than most British attempts at humor. 
(Oct.) 



SOLDIERS OF THE STORM— Columbia- 
Standard melodrama about a U. S. Border Patrol 
aviator and liquor smugglers; Regis Toomey makes it 
distinctly good entertainment. (Aug.) 



SOLITAIRE MAN, THE— M-G-M.— Crooked 
doings in an airplane. Herbert Marshall, Lionel 
Atwill, and Mary Boland as a screamingly funny- 
American tourist. (Nov.) 



TAMING THE JUNGLE— Invincible.— Another 
revelation of lion taming. Some interest, but not hot. 
(Aug.) 

TARZAN THE FEARLESS— Principal.— Buster 
Crabbe doing Johnny Weissmuller stuff in a disjointed 
Tarzan tale. Indifferent film fare. (Nov.) 

• THIS DAY AND AGE— Paramount.— Cecil 
B. DeMille produces a grim but gripping story 
of boys who clean up on a gangster when the police fail 
A challenging picture that everyone will talk about. 
(Oct.) 

THIS IS AMERICA— Frederick Ullman. Jr. Prod. 
— Newsreel material, brilliantly selected and as- 
sembled by Gilbert Seldes, tells the story of America 
from 1917 to the present. Well worth seeing. (Oct.) 

• THREE-CORNERED MOON— Paramount. 
— Nicely done comedy about an impractical, 
happy family. Mary Boland the impractical mama; 
Claudette Colbert the daughter, in love with would- 
be author Hardie Albright. But Doctor Dick Arlen 
moves in and upsets things. (Oct.) 



16 



Photoplay Magazine for February, 1934 



THUNDER OVER MEXICO— So! Lessor Prod. 

— Russian genius Sergei Eisenstein's idea of Mexico's 
revolt against Diaz; breath-taking photography and 
scenery. (.4 ug.) 

TILLIE AND GUS— Paramount.— Even W. C. 
Fields and Alison Skipworth couldn't make much of 
this would-be comedy. (Dec.) 



TO THE LAST MAN— Paramount. — Randolph 
Scott and Esther Ralston, as representatives of 
feuding ex-Kentucky families, lend welcome plot 
variety to this good Western. (Dec.) 

•TOO MUCH HARMONY — Paramount.— A 
zippy musical enriched by Jack Oakie, Bing 
Crosby, many other A-l laugh-getters. A riot of fun. 
(Nov.) 

TORCH SINGER— Paramount.— Claudette Col- 
bert is an unmarried mother who succeeds as a singer. 
Her songs are fine; Baby LeRoy. (Nov.) 

TRAIL DRIVE, THE— Universal.— An accept- 
able Western with Ken Maynard. (Oct.) 



• TUGBOAT ANNIE— M-G-M.— Marie Dres- 
sier and Wally Beery provide fun running their 
tubgoat about Seattle. Not exactly a "Min and 
Bill," but splendid entertainment. (Oct.) 

• TURN BACK THE CLOCK— M-G-M— Lee 
Tracy does a bang-up job as a man given a 
chance to live his life over again. Mae Clarke, Peggy 
Shannon, Otto Kruger, others; a fast-moving, grip- 
ping story. ( Nov.) 

• VOLTAIRE— Warners. — A triumph for 
George Arliss, as the whimsical French phil- 
osopher intriguing at court. Reginald Owen superb 
as Louis XV. (Sept.) 



WAFFLES — Helen Mitchell Prod.— They 
shouldn't have tried making a Southern girl of Sari 
Maritza. The rest of it is in keeping with this mis- 
take. ( Nov.) 



WALLS OF GOLD— Fox.— Sally Eilers. others, 
wander dully through a dull tale about marrying for 
money after a lovers' falling out. (Dec.) 

WALTZ TIME — Gaumont- British. — Charming 
music helps a dull, draggy story. (Dec.) 

WAY TO LOVE, THE— Paramount.— Maurice 
Chevalier wants to be a Paris guide, but finds himself 
sheltering gypsy Ann Dvorak in his roof-top home. 
Plenty of fun then. (Dec.) 

WHAT PRICE INNOCENCE?— Columbia- 
Parents Minna Gombell, Bryant Washburn, won't 
tell daughter Jean Parker the truth about sex, as 
advised by doctor Willard Mack; tragedy follows. 
A powerful sermon. (Sept.) 

• WHEN LADIES MEET— M-G-M.— Unexcit- 
ing, but brilliantly acted. Ann Harding as wife, 
Myrna Loy as menace, Frank Morgan, Alice Brady, 
Bob Montgomery. (Aug.) 



WHEN STRANGERS MARRY— Columbia — 
A dull piece, offering nothing new, about why white 
men's wives go wrong in the tropics. Jack Holt, 
Lilian Bond. (Aug.) 



WHITE WOMAN— Paramount.— Charles Laugh- 
ton, ruler of African jungle kingdom, discovers that 
Carole Lombard, cast-off, whom he is sheltering, has 
fallen in love with Kent Taylor. And what blood- 
curdling horror follows! (Jan.) 



WILD BOYS OF THE ROAD— First National.— 
A well-done story of youngsters who turned hoboes 
during the depression. (Dec.) 



WOMAN I STOLE, THE— Columbia.— Herge- 
sheimer's "Tampico" done in Algeria. Big oil man 
Jack Holt after Donald Cook's wife, Fay Wray. 
Fair. (Sept.) 



• WORLD CHANGES, THE— First National. 
— Paul Muni splendid in the life story of a 
Dakota farm boy who amasses a fortune in the meat 
packing industry, but is ruined by greedy snobbish 
relatives. (Dec.) 



WORST WOMAN IN PARIS?, THE— Fox — 

Adolphe Menjou, Benita Hume. Harvey Stephens, in 
a mild tale about a misunderstood woman. (Dec.) 



WRECKER, THE — Columbia. — So-so story 
about he-man Jack Holt, in the house-wrecking busi- 
ness, who loses his wife (Genevieve Tobin) to home- 
wrecker Sidney Blackmer. George E. Stone great as 
a junkman. (Oct.) 



■>\V.<T- 
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500 PEOPLE IN 
SCIENTIFIC TESTS 
END COLDS IN 
HALF THE TIME 



You may benefit by what they 

proved — Pepsodent Antiseptic 

fought off colds — cut time 

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Recently an interesting tes 
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Scientists found that the antisi 
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These scientists took a gro: 
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Here are some of the rema* 
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A cold will last live daj 
Pepsodent Antiseptic isga 
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j from a cold were saved 

Many of the group wbg 
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j months. The number 
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i with other antisepti 

This is the first test of i ; 
tiric conditions with thv 
j salt water. M 
public t 





%Jlef*& * 3 



Pepsodent is 3 times more powerful than other leading 
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protection — gives you 3 times more for your money. 



THE test of any antiseptic is : will it 
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convincing proof of what Pepsodent 
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Five hundred people were divided into 
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gargled with plain salt and water — some 
with leading antiseptics — one group 
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Those who used Pepsodent had 50% 
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PEPSODENT ANTISEPTIC 




i8 



Photoplay Magazine for February, 1934 



CENTER OF THE WINTERTIME WORLD 



C 



The Most 

AMAZING 
VACATION 

Ever Conceived 



A. 




"Center of 
gates are 



> challenge to the future — this audac- 
ious vacation plan of the Miami Biltmore! 
Offering more than sumptuous living in 
one of the world's greatest hotels, the 
Miami Biltmore announces a policy of 
guest entertainment, privileges and special 
courtesies that has NEVER been equalled 
ANYWHERE. As a guest of the hotel you 
are entitled to a COMPLETE VACATION 
— whether you spend the winter or a few 
weeks. No matter what your tastes in sports 
and social diversions, in vacation relax- 
ation or holiday excitements, you can 
indulge them at their best in the Miami 
Biltmore plan. 

When you register in this 
the Wintertime World" the 
opened to you to all the important resort 
pleasures of this world-famous playground 
. . . many of which can be enjoyed only 
at the Miami Biltmore . . . social functions 
of national distinction . . . sports events 
of national and international interest. 

For example, as a patron of the hotel, 
you are extended full privileges in the 
Florida Year Round Clubs . . . three mag- 
nificent sports centers — the Miami Biltmore 
Country Club, the Roney Plaza Cabana 
Sun Club at Miami Beach and the Key 
Largo Anglers Club down on the Florida 
"keys". 

An extraordinary economy — and a 
service which expands your enjoyment to 
the entire Miami resort area — is the trans- 
portation system operating from the Miami 
Biltmore and serving all units of the 
Florida Year Round Clubs. Without extra 
expense, you ride by aerocar to the races, 
dog tracks, downtown shopping and theater 
districts. Or fly by autogiro to Miami 
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Bay to Key Largo and the celebrated fish- 



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On the hotel estate itself is the 18-hole 
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for this year's play . . . with a staff of five 
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COSTELLO and NED EVERHART. Also, 
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Open October 28th to June 30th 

For information, literature and reservations 
address hotel direct or see your travel agent 



MIAMI BILTMOhE 



C O R A L 



GABLES 



MIAMI 



FLORIDA 




Kenneth Alexander 



THE Crane Twins are in Hollywood to give the proper Down-in- 
the-Latin Quarter reZ'de'chaussee touch to Constance Bennett's 
new picture, "Moulin Rouge." The Crane girls, one of the most famous 
dancing teams in the country, are garbed as Apache dancers. And the 
dance they do would be cheered by the most exacting Parisian audience 




Elmer Fryer 



RUTH CHATTERTON has a far-away look in her eye, and it's a 
bet that she is going to make good her threat to leave camera cares 
behind and take a jaunt into foreign lands with Hubby George Brent. 
Ruth recently finished "Journal of a Crime." And she won't look at a 
single script. Too busy studying maps and poring over travel books 




Robert W. Coburn 



WHEN a star radically changes her type of roles, the studio is 
usually in a dither of fear. But nobody seems worried about the 
new Dolores Del Rio's chances at the boxoffice! Tired of being a 
"native girl," she bobbed her hair, had a permanent and put on some 
swanky clothes before facing the camera for RKOs "Dance of Desire" 




Clarence Sinclair Bull 



GRETA GARBO as Queen Christina is impressively beautiful. 
And throughout the picture no detail of setting or costume to make 
the role more dramatically effective has been overlooked. The three 
lighted tapers, the rich background of wood, the graceful folds of 
Christina s gown, lend this portrait elegance and beautiful simplicity 



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Will Walling. Jr. 



WHEN a feller needs a friend, he's likely to find his dog a most encouraging buddy. 
That's why Herbert Marshall was happy to greet his sad-eyed setter on returning 
from Hawaii where he worked in Cecil B. De Mille's "Four Frightened People." Marshall 
brought his dog all the way from England, but studio rules forbade taking him on location 



; 



Close-Ups and Long-Shots 



DEVELOPMENTS in the Fairbanks-Pickford 
drama are split three ways. First, Mary's 
divorce suit has definitely been filed. Second, 
both Doug and Mary are out of United Artists, which 
was founded in connection with Charlie Chaplin and 
D. W. Griffith. Third, the report comes from London 
that, despite the severing of his domestic and business 
ties in Hollywood, Douglas is going to return to Cali- 
fornia. With the announcement that she was filing 
suit for divorce, Mary stated she would retain Pick- 
fair, the home she and Douglas built over ten years 
ago. 

The combined interests of the two in United Artists 
have been bought by 20th Century Pictures. Joseph 
Schenck and Samuel Goldwyn are the purchasers of 
their large holdings. 



IT is unthinkable that Lee Tracy's little Mexican 
escapade may go down in history as another Fatty 
Arbuckle tragedy. It seems fantastic that a profes- 
sional career, built after years of endeavor, should 
summarily be tossed on the ash heap for so trivial an 
offense. 

If the Tracy incident had occurred in the United 
States, the whole matter would have blown over in a 
week. Undoubtedly Mexican newspaper enterprise 
was largely, if not altogether, responsible for the 
attitude taken by the Mexican government. The 
parading cadets, whom Tracy is alleged to have in- 
sulted, appeared to have taken the matter lightly but 
when the press of the capital found good copy in the 
incident, the hue and cry for the Americano's scalp 
arose. 



THAT Doug, under these circumstances, should 
consider returning to California may come as a 
surprise to many. His two thousand acre citrus ranch 
will, it is said, be his future home and he will build a 
house there consistent with the fortune he has accumu- 
lated as motion picture star and producer. 

This report, though in variance with Doug, Jr.'s, 
statement that neither of them would ever return per- 
manently to California, is, nevertheless, compatible 
with his father's restless spirit. The quiet peace of the 
English country-side and too constant association 
with the formalities of Britain's upper classes may 
possibly be getting just a little bit on Doug's nerves. 
He has spent more time on the continent than in 
England. He took shots in Spain for his forthcoming 
picture, "Exit Don Juan, " and found diversion in the 
lofty peaks of the Swiss Alps. The elbow room to be 
found in Southern California may look very inviting 
to Doug. 

MEANTIME, Mary has kept herself busy with 
social and other activities. It is her ambition 
to add to her laurels by presenting a stage play on 
Broadway. 

Observers say that the rift between her and Doug 
began with the making of "Taming of the Shrew" 
in 1929. Shortly after Doug took his first trip alone 
and then the whispering began that all was not well 
at Pickfair. 

And Hollywood is now busily conjecturing what 
the next chapters may be in this tangled life drama. 



THE episode seems to have more significance than 
is apparent on the surface. The conjecture that 
the Mexicans object to the filming of the story of 
Pancho Villa may not be far from the mark. It is true 
that a press report states the Mexican government 
authorized the making of this picture, but it may be 
that this authorization was later regretted. Tracy's 
prank offered a splendid opportunity to revoke the 
official sanction. 

It is a well-known fact that Mexicans have always 
resented the portrayal of Mexican villains on the 
screen. Nearly five years ago in "In Old Arizona" 
Warner Baxter, though cast as a typical stage Mexican 
"bad-man," remarked he was of Portuguese extrac- 
tion. A fortunate coincidence with respect to film 
markets across the Rio Grande. 



JUST after the trouble broke and the public was 
uncertain as to the facts in the case, a "trailer" of 
the picture "Advice to the Lovelorn" featuring Lee, was 
shown in a Los Angeles theater. Some of the audience 
hissed. 

However, a day or two later, when there was a 
greater knowledge of the facts in the case, Lee's ap- 
pearance on the screen was enthusiastically ap- 
plauded. 

I believe that Lee Tracy is too good an actor and 
too popular a one to remain long in seclusion. 

On page eight of this issue are a few of the many 
letters received, in which Tracy devotees ask that he 
be reinstated in his proper position. 

25 



AL COHN, scenarist of a host of films, several of 
them markedly outstanding, is the new Collector 
of U. S. Customs at Los Angeles. You remember the 
early "Cohens and Kellys," "The Cat and the 
Canary," "Cisco Kid," and the first feature length 
sound picture, "The Jazz Singer." They were just a 
few of Al's screen output. 

His new job as Customs Collector is no sinecure. It 
is a position demanding an unusual knowledge of 
human nature and the breadth and diplomacy of a 
statesman. 

Keep your eye on Al. FrOm now on you'll hear a 
lot more about him in public affairs. 



REMEMBER Stepin Fetchit, the tired colored 
boy? 

Step is back in Hollywood, working with Janet 
Gaynor in "Carolina." But he had an awful time 
getting there. 

At the peak of his success, Step had three lim- 
ousines and three uniformed chauffeurs. But that was 
then. Recently, he found himself broke, in Tampa, 
Florida. A wealthy insurance man gave Stepin a 
four-year-old limousine, and enough money to get 
back to Hollywood. 



MOTION pictures have stepped officially into 
education. More than 17,000 high school 
teachers are united under the banner of the National 
Council of English Teachers to use the talkies as a 
medium of English education. Those with an his- 
torical basis are preferred, such films as "Cavalcade" 
and "Little Women," rich in historical background or 
depicting manners and customs of a past age. 

Says Carl E. Milliken, secretary of the Motion 
Picture Producers and Distributors of America: 

"First, there has been a definite desire on the part 
of teachers to link up education more closely with life 
than it has been — and the film is certainly the logical 
answer to that. 

"Second, there has come about a realization that 
the children of today are capable of taking the equiv- 
alent of literature out of films instead of books. 

"Third, the experimental work which has been con- 
ducted over a period of two and one-half years on 
teaching with films has set the educators to thinking 
how best to utilize the motion picture, and because 
in a majority of instances they have not been able to 
obtain the necessary equipment, they will turn to 
the theaters for their instruction. 

"Fourth, and possibly the most important of all, 
is the fact that the motion picture offers the most 
uniformly interesting educational material for students 
of all types and mentality. The children prefer it 
and the teachers do not have to stimulate their 
interest because it is there already. All the teacher 
has to do is utilize that interest motive power. 

"Finally, teachers have become conscious of their 
responsibility in helping to steer children's use of 
their leisure time." 



But what has become of the superstition that 
movies are subversive of intellectual taste? 



SHAKESPEARE may ask, "What's in a name?" 
but Hollywood will tell you there's plenty. Espe- 
cially the names of pictures. Many a good picture 
has been utterly ruined at the box-office with titles 
that simply didn't appeal to the public, or with names 
that misled the theater patron into believing the pic- 
ture dealt with subject matter that didn't seem 
attractive to him. 



FOR instance, M-G-M executives experienced the 
greatest shock of their lives recently when "Bomb- 
shell" failed to click in the manner that had been 
expected. A check-up revealed that over half the 
public thought it was a war story, and war stories 
are not in popular favor. The studio hurriedly 
changed the title to "The Blonde Bombshell," but 
too late to reap much of a harvest from this really 
outstanding film. 

Paramount experienced the same thing with its 
"Mama Loves Papa." A grand little comedy, such 
as the public loves and it was a box-office disappoint- 
ment simply because the title conveyed the idea it 
was just another bedroom slap-stick comedy. 

Yes, a good picture name means plenty — of jack. 

WESTERNS used to be the backbone of prac- 
tically every studio in Hollywood. Independent 
companies depended solely on them for their existence. 
But they will soon be a memory of the past, like the 
cowboy they so dramatically depicted. 

Hoot Gibson is out, George O'Brien on his last 
picture at Fox, Tom Keene left Radio several months 
ago for stage training to fit him for dramatic roles. 

There is many a man who will regret the passing 
of the old. 



EVERY time a producer goes abroad he signs up 
some foreign actor. "Winnie" Sheehan, holding 
to this rule, has returned with Ketti Gallian, young 
French actress, under contract for "Marie Gallante." 
He has also signed Pat Patterson and Hugh Williams, 
both of whom are English. Lilian Harvey has been 
no knockout in her first two American pictures. 
Dorothea Wieck was highly praised for her work in 
" Maedchen In Uniform," but has been damned with 
faint praise for "Cradle Song." Wera Engels and 
Tala Birell didn't cause a ripple in Hollywood. It 
remains to be seen what Anna Sten will do in "Nana." 
Kathryn Sergava, who was kept under contract to 
M-G-M to take Garbo's place in case she didn't come 
back, has been signed by Warner Brothers. 

With the small percentage that ever make good, 
what is it that brings the actors to this country? 
With the present rate of exchange, the money is not 
what it was at one time. 

Kathryn Dougherty 



2C> 



Photoplay Magazine for February, 1934 



27 



V 



/ 




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UNDRAPING 



By Ruth 
Rankin 

ILLUSTRATED BY 
KR\NK DOBIAS 



"O. Hollywood isn't 
a nudist colony. 

It still clings to 
three sequins and 
half an ounce of chiffon. Every screen musical is loaded 
with slightly clad beauty. 

And it's not only the chorus girls who have been reveal- 
ing their charms. 

The stars are doing it, too! 

Never before in the history of pictures have stars holding a 
position comparable with that of Joan Crawford, Clara Bow, 
Lilian Harvey, Mae West, Gloria Stuart, Ruth Etting or Ginger 
Rogers, consented to appear before the camera in such scanty 
attire. And thereby they have started a revolution— a revolu- 
tion in fashions for women — which will be felt and seen — par- 
ticularly seen — 'round the world. 

We have beheld a lot of Joan Crawford in a number of 
pictures. But in " Dancing Lady," we saw her in the briefest 



panties and a mere whisper of brassiere — and a gardenia. The 
gardenia was removed when the shot was taken. It was jusl 
there to stimulate her morale. Joan wanted no visitors on the 
set at the time. The whole world was going to see the picture 
and a full orchestra, plus a crew of twenty, was quite enough 



With stars wearing three-ounce costumes. 



28 



HOLLYWOOD 




In 'Roman Scandals" two regal and dignified ladies named 
irree Teasdale and Ruth Etting wear a costume that has its 
11 local Hollywood name. There is considerable hiatus be- 
een where the top ends and the skirt begins. The chorus in 
e number in that same picture is not very substantially 



Never before 
have famous 
stars appeared 
before the movie 
cameras in such 
scant attire 



clothed in long flowing golden 
locks, a la Lady Godiva. 
Without the horse. 

Clara Bow revealed her new 
low of 118 pounds almost in its 
entirety in "Hoopla." 

And in the fan dance num- 
ber in "Sitting Pretty," Ginger Rogers wore a two and a 
half ounce costume (plus fan), which was so frank that 
she refused to allow any still pictures to be taken. 

Claudette Colbert wore lots of skirt, but no top worth men- 
tioning, in "Torch Singer." 

And every schoolgirl knows what Mae West is doing. 
What will be the effect of this wholesale undraping on the 
new fashion trend? 

It is an axiom, scarcely needful of repetition, that pictures 
and stars make styles. Look what "Letty Lynton" did to our 
shoulders — and regard the effect [ please turn to page 113 ] 



ashions for women are going to change! 



29 




Clarence Sinclair Bull 



ESTHER RALSTON, who left pictures to troupe in 
vaudeville, is making her screen comeback. Good 
work she did in Universale "By Candlelight," and she 
has a contract with M-G-M tucked away. Esther went 
on the stage at the age of two. She's bound for the front! 



30 



Power Behind 

the 




Here's the real secret of 
all that weird bally hooing 

By Wilbur Morse, Jr. 



THERE have been many tales told of Hollywood celeb- 
rities who have turned social climbers and skinned their 
noses. 

This is the story of a girl who reversed the plot, an 
attractive young heiress from Manhattan who snatched at the 
brass ring in the mad merry -go-round of the movies and caught 
it. 

It was not fame for herself she sought. It was to learn if she 
could outsmart the ballvhoo artists in their own field of bluster- 



Katharine's every eccentric move is just so much play acting 
and Laura Harding is her competent scenarist and director 



The smile of achievement. Her job done, Laura 
says goodbye, as Hepburn leaves Hollywood 



ing showmanship, put on a better act than anyone 
else in the versatile vaudeville revue they call Holly- 
wood, that this imaginative young lady invaded the 
film capital. She backed a likely young racer in the 
Hollywood handicap and brought her charge past the 
judges' stand — a winner. 

Today, back in her big Fifth Avenue house, this girl 
is sitting, content with the knowledge that hers was 
the guiding hand in one of the most spectacular screen 
careers the movies have ever known. 



It was just as Katharine Hepburn was deserting the 
top rung of the movie ladder to return to the New 
York stage for several months that Hollywood realized 
that — behind the sudden [ please turn to page 107 ] 

SI 



"Can A MAN LOVE Two 




"The woman a man loves represents the acme of perfection," says 
Gary. And Mr. Cooper smiles at his own "acme of perfection" 



Gary Cooper, Holly- 
wood's greatest and 
most gallant lover, 
answers this question 

By Virginia Maxwell 



THE tall, handsome, he-man Gary sat back 
in a huge chair in his New York hotel and 
let one of his long legs dangle over the 
other. I suppose I ought to give the girls 
a treat and tell them that their favorite screen 
lover was in his pajamas — orchid silk with a white 
stripe, beneath a very good-looking white flannel 
lounging robe. Well, I will tell them, for he was. 
It was 10 a.m. and Gary was ready for breakfast. 

What with Gary declaring he had earned the 
right to make his own decisions; arrange his life 
and his love to suit himself, and that no influence 
could change his mind about anything touching 
his personal life, we were prepared to find him 
in a very independent state of mind. 

His engagement to Sandra Shaw had just been 
announced by her parents. 

"We've come to ask you a lot of very personal 
questions," was the opening volley. Gary Cooper 
blushed a little, picked up a menu and hastily 
ordered breakfast. A man's sized breakfast with 
oatmeal and cream and crumpets and ham and 
eggs and — well, you know Gary hails from the 
wide open spaces and he eats breakfasts like 
rough-ridin' cowboys. 

Over these homey vittles, we chatted about 
love and life and the things most of Gary Cooper's 
admirers might like to know. Gary is not easy to 
talk with; he seems fearful that he will be misin- 
terpreted, a little bashful when trapped into a 
direct answer touching any of the personal things 
in his life — such as Sandra Shaw. 

""NV'ES, I'm engaged," Gary admitted, "but just 

i- when the marriage will take place is uncer- 
tain. Maybe three months, perhaps not before six 
months. We have set no definite date, for various 
reasons." 

Just at this moment Gary was lifting a spoonful 
of his oatmeal and I noticed a slender platinum 
band on his small finger. 

"Does that ring explain the mysterious trip to 
Yuma; the trip the newspapers wrote down as 
your wedding trip?" 

Gary seemed a little embarrassed; he studied 
the menu card. 

" Gosh, every time anybody goes to Yuma the 
press immediately conclude they've gone to get 
married. What I'd really like to know is why 
every Yuma wedding report says they had to get 
the sheriff out of bed. Sheriffs must sleep all the 
time down there," he laughed. 

"But the ring, Gary. How about that?" 

"Oh, that. It's merely a ring-guard. I wear 
it to keep this Indian ring from slipping off. 
That's all." 

"Well, now that that's settled, let's find out 
what you think about this business of being in 
love with two people at'the same time. We mean, 
of course, the sort of theme worked out in ' Design 
for Living.' " 



Women at the Same Time? 



•>•> 



" I believe two men could love the same woman, 
but not for a very long time," he explained. 
" Life is too drab a proposition to continue the 
gay, light manner such a situation would require. 
It could go on just so long as neither of the men 
took their love seriously. 

"Men," said Gary, "have always shared a fine 
fraternal spirit with each other and this, very 
often, is more precious to them than the love of 
the woman which might split up their friendship. 
But if that love were to become an all-consuming 
passion, a man's primitive instinct for possession 
and protection would surmount everything else. 
And the other man, who also loved this woman, 
would become his bitterest enemy. They'd detest 
each other, I think. That's the way instinct 
would have it." 

"But how about a man being in love with two 
women at the same time? Do you suppose the 
reverse order of ' Design for Living' would be 
possible?" 

Gary looked straight at us, a little suspiciously, 
then his good-looking face broke into a smile. 

"You mean the reverse order of the 'Design 
for Living' situation?" he made certain. 

"Yes — or any similar real life situation." 

"No, I don't believe a man can really love two 
women at the same time," he said, after thinking 
it over a while. "Not if it's really love. As I see 
it, the woman a man loves represents the acme of 
perfection. He sees her as a combination of all 




As this issue goes to press, word is received that Gary and 
the lovely Sandra Shaw have been married in New York 



the desirable qualities he's ever found in anyone else. It may 
be an illusion, of course. But while he's in love, he sees only 
one woman's perfection. And to her, he would compare any 
other woman he might meet. 

"You know," Gary went on, "I get all mixed up about things 
sometimes. I try to figure out life's little ways, and when I get 
so baffled I don't know quite what to do, I pick up 'Alice in 
Wonderland' and skim through it. Then I conclude that life 
really is just about as cock-eyed as Alice found it, too." 

About this time the telephone rang and Gary went to answer 
it, taking long strides across the room as though he were very 
eager for that call. 

AND if you've ever heard Gary's voice soften in his talkies 
when he speaks to the girl of his heart, you should have 
heard the well-known Cooper cadence that morning. No one 
tried to listen, of course. But it just couldn't be avoided over- 
hearing the tender little things Gary said to a lucky girl on 
the other end. Obviously, that girl was Sandra Shaw. 

Gary's tender solicitude toward Sandra formed the first real 
doubt we had that he would remain a bachelor as long as he 
had predicted. Maybe by the time this story reaches print 
Gary will be honeymooning somewhere in the South Sea 
Islands. For he confessed an overwhelming desire to live there 
for a while, "far out away from everything and everyone, 
where a man can be close to the elemental things of life . . ." 
was what Gary really said about that anticipated trip. 

"I want to travel everywhere, to taste life in the raw as well 
as in this ultra civilization," Gary nodded toward Park Avenue 
below. "Frankly, I like both [please turn to page 119] 

33 




G. Mailhird Kesslere 



Sylvia, modern miracle worker, has helped 
keep many of the stars on their pedestals 



DEAR Clara: I've just seen you in "Hoopla." 
and I think you're great! You're that regu- 
lar hot-cha Bow again with just enough dramatic 
scenes to show how good an actress you are. But 
I'll let your reviewers and dramatic critics tell 
you about that. I've got another message for 
you, and although I'm talking to you exactly as 
I'd talk face to face, I want all the other girls and 
women to listen in, too, because what I've got to 
say will also help them. 

Are you all set? Can you take it? Well, here 
goes! 

You have glorious eyes, Clara, but I'm going 
to tell you how to make them ten times more 
glorious. Remember in your picture "Hoopla" 
when Minna Gombell says, "With your eyes you 
can draw the ducks off the pond"? If you'll do 
what I say, you can lure the swans off the lake 
and the battleships off the ocean. Because, 
right now, Clara, your face is too fat. And 
you've got to do something about it. That's 
why I'm writing to you. I know exactly how 
you can take off the excess plumpness on your 
face and make your eyes a million times more 
lovely. 

Look at yourself in the mirror, darling. Look 
at your heavy cheeks. Now listen to me while 
I tell you something I've never told anyone be- 

34 



Sylvia Gives 

Clara Bow 

Some Timely 

Advice 



fore. I've done this trick to the opera singers, Mary Lewis and 
Jeritza, and to lots of society women. But I've never told 
anyone about it. I'm telling you, Clara, for your own good. 

This is the way to take that fat off your cheeks. This is the 
way you, or any other woman, can do it. 

With the thumb and forefinger of both hands, lift the 
muscles just above the jaw-bone away from the bone. Don't 
stretch the skin, just gently lift up the fat as if you were going 

to pinch your own face. 



A slumping posture like Clara 
used in "Hoopla" causes a 
hump at the top of the spine 



Get the idea? The muscle 
is lifted away from the 
jaw and there is a ridge of 
skin on top. Now slowly 
work in a progressive 
movement with your four 
fingers — the thumb and 
forefinger of both hands — 
working from the chin to 
the ear, gently squeezing 
the muscles. Don't touch 
the bone, and leave the 
ridge of skin alone. Just 
squeeze, gently, into the 
muscles. 

If you'll do this every 
day for ten or fifteen min- 
utes — but go slowly at 
first, because your face will 
be sore — you won't know 
yourself in |a couple of 
months. I know you can 
do it! I've done it many, 
many times. 

So I'm telling you the 
trick, and the rest is up to 
you. 

I KNOW what I'm talk- 
ing about, because thou- 
sands of readers of Photo- 
play have told me that 
my suggestions work, and 
if these girls and women — 
and they're your fans, 
Clara — if they can do it, 
so can you! I'm sincere, 
and I'm trusting you to 
heed my advice. 

Start working on that 
jaw the minute you read 
this, Clara. But wait! 
I'm not through with your 
face. 

Your nose is grand_ 



Don't touch it, but on either side of your 
nose, right up close to your eyes, is a slight 
plumpness that should be taken off, and it 
can be done so easily. Use the forefinger 
and middle finger of each hand and — with 
just a little cold cream on the fingers — 
pressing very gently and with a rotary 
movement, work away from the nose and 
up towards the outer corners of the eyes. 
Don't stretch the skin and don't start this 
until the jaw-line is well under way. Hon- 
estly, Clara, when you've done these things 
you're going to be solovely and so beautiful, 
because you've got everything to work with. 
I've always admired you, Clara, for your 
spunk and for the way you wouldn't let 
anything get you down. You've shown 
courage all through your life. And you're 
still showing it. The way you've given up 
all that Hollywood nonsense for a fine out- 
door life on the ranch. And your adopting 
those two kids. I think it's great! But 
you can't stop there. You've got to work 
on your figure now, because you can't let 
your admirers down. 

DON'T forget that you're an idol to mil- 
lions of women. They think you're 
beautiful — and you are — and you can't dis- 
appoint them by appearing in your pictures 
any way but perfect. How long do you 
think they'll idolize your appearance if 
they, themselves, have a better figure than 
you have? This is common sense talk, 
Clara, and you know it! And your devo- 
tees, who have been reading my articles, 
have pitched right in and taken fat off 
their bodies. You've just got to do the same. 
You can't let them get ahead of you. 

Besides, most of the girls in Hollywood 
have "weight clauses" in their contracts. 
The producers know that the stars must be 
slender. The studio execs tear their hair 
when they see you girls putting on weight. 
And that's pretty tough on the thin-haired 
executives! 





^JbLA 



Above: Clara's eyes would be even more beautiful if her face 
were thinner — and that's an easy job, says Sylvia. Left: the 
slump hump can't be hidden, but Sylvia tells how to lose it 



Another thing you've got to watch is that "old woman's 
bump" on the last vertebra at the top of your spine. You're 
just a kid. You're not old enough to have that, and you've 
got to get rid of it. Now, I know that in "Hoopla" you were 
slumping because that was part of the characterization, but 
slumping is an easy habit to form, so be careful that you don't 
do it in real life. Slumping makes an "old woman's bump." 
Now you've got to get rid of it. And it can be done, too. I 
know! Because I had one once myself and I got rid of it. 
And here's the way. 

Lie on the floor on your back with your arms above your 
head, backs of the hands lightly touching the floor. Relax. 
The trouble with most people when they do a lying down 
exercise is that they stiffen up. Well, don't do it. You're not 
going to break. Use your brain and remember that even while 
you're stretching and even while you're doing this exercise 
you must be relaxed. 

Now stretch your arms and you can feel those shoulder-blades 
coming together. You can feel that "old woman's bump" 
moving. Atta girl! That's [ please turn to page 112 ] 



And dont miss Sylvia's personal answers to girls, on page 1121 




*1 



By Frazier Hunt 

Who has interviewed 
kings and presidents 
but never before a 
motion picture star 



:.1 



mmtammmKKBm 



The indefatigable star who is not content to be just a famous 
actress. Most ambitious, Joan trains herself for greater 



movie 
roles 



street costume, I saw how unnecessary my fears 
had been; we both spoke the same language. 

It was a language that had to do with people 
and their hearts — their dreams and their longings. 
It had to do with mutual friends and the hidden 
qualities that made them lovable and remem- 
bered. And it had much to do with happiness 
and tomorrow's work. 

At the very first I wasn't sure we were going to 
get along. During those initial thirty seconds she 
was very much the grand screen star. She had 
just faced a crowd of admirers on Fifth Avenue 
who had surrounded her, and there had been a 
little shoving and pressure. With her great, wide- 
set blue eyes flashing, she told me that she 
suffered terribly from claustrophobia. I believe 
that was the word. I know I thought to myself 
that it was a very big word for such a little person 
to use. 



I 



I CAME away feeling, as Chic Sale would say, "Jes' good — 
jes' good all over." 
In this mad, swirling world of today 1 had found a person 
utterly happy. Her name is Joan Crawford. 
It was a strange and exciting interview. For almost twenty 
years it's been my business to talk to people, big and little — to 
try to find out what's behind their fronts, what they're really 
thinking. I've interviewed kings and presidents, generals and 
revolutionary leaders, bandits and bankers — but never before 
had I interviewed a motion picture star. 

As a matter of fact, I felt just a little bewildered when I 
pushed the bell of her New York suite. But a half-minute after 
she'd stepped into the sitting-room in a chic black and white 

30 



VE had it ever since my brother locked me in 
a dark closet when I was a child," she ex- 
plained. "And it always frightens me now to be 
hemmed in — whether by walls or by a crowd." 

She settled back in the corner of the great 
divan and pulled her skirt well down over a pair 
of very lovely ankles. "Hope you won't mind 
my wearing mules," she said with a quick smile. 
"My poor feet are worn out from shopping." 
"I don't mind at all," I hurriedly answered. 
I wanted to tell her the story about Mark 
Twain — but I passed up the chance. Remember 
it? Someone was complaining to the great 
Missourian that Lillian Russell was appearing in 
a current show in tights. " My dear friend," the 
incomparable Mark answered, "I'd rather see 
Lillian Russell without any clothes on at all than 
General Grant in full uniform." 

I wish now that I had told it to her. I know 
that she would have chuckled over it. But in- 
stead I made some inane remark about how hard 
it was to get around New York these days. And 
then out of the blue sky — or rather down from 
the golden ceiling — dropped the name of Odd 
Mclntyre. We both pounced on it at the same time. 

"There may be greater O. O. Mclntyre admirers than I am, 
but if there are I've never met them," Joan said eagerly. " For 
four years I've saved every single column of Mr. Mclntyre's 
" New York Day by Day." I've had a special scrap-book made 
for them and I paste every one of them in myself. And let me 
tell you that until I get my coffee in the morning I'm a fit com- 
panion only for a sore-toothed tiger, but I have to read O. O.'s 
kindly philosophies even before I touch my coffee." 

Then I told one. I- This past summer out in Great Falls, 
Montana, a little priest rushed up to me and pumped my hand. 
"I never thought I'd really get to meet you," he exclaimed 
breathlessly. 




"I want to go on and on with my work. My next picture is to be 'Pretty Sadie McKee' — and I'm all ready for my big 
chance. I'd like to do 'The Merry Widow' with Maurice Chevalier, and with Irving Thalberg to supervise it" 



I could feel my chest swelling. Here at last was my loyal 
reader-admirer I'd been looking for all these years. Then he 
popped me over the head: "Of course," he explained, "I've 
never actually read any of your pieces or heard you on the radio, 
but for years I've followed you in 0. 0. Mclntyre's column." 

Joan was sympathetic. "How lucky you are to know him so 
well," she said rather wistfully. "It's strange, but I've only 
met him once, and then at a large party. But to me he's a very 
fine writer and a great soul." 

"Wonder what it is that gives him his tremendous follow- 
ing?" I queried. 

She hesitated, then answered: "I think it's because he is 
always so gentle about everything." 



That second I knew I was going to like her immensely. She 
had said a wise and beautiful thing about a friend. 

"Tell me about your pictures," I pleaded. "Honestly, I 
don't know the first thing about them. For instance, what do 
you want to do?" 

" I want to go on and on with this wonderful art. Then some 
day I want to go on the stage. I want really to be a very great 
actress. I'm willing to work hard to do it. I'm ready to give 
years of my life." 

"But the stage is old-fashioned," I insisted. 

"Yes, but it will always be a great magnet that will keep 
pulling at us all. I want to feel the thrill of a real audience. I 
work for weeks and weeks on a [ please turn to page 1 14 ] 



37 



AST 



w% 



f*4^y 



• • 






Once the highest paid Hollywood star and a 
world-wide favorite, Tom Mix has also de- 
serted the screen because Westerns don't pay 






*S* 



hoisted their silver-mounted saddles up to the 
rack of Western retirement alongside the dusty 
bridles of Buck Jones, Hoot Gibson, Tom Mix 
and Bill Hart. They've coiled their lariats over 






"Bronco Billy" Anderson, as the very first 
daredevil cowboy, supplied the movies with 
some of its earliest thrills. But Anderson retired 






THE jingle of Chihuahua spurs and the rustle 
of chapparajos is unfamiliar music to Holly- 
wood Boulevard today. And fewer and fewer 
• ten-gallon sombreros shed from lean, wind- 
tanned faces the dying rays of the Western sun, whose 
every setting seems to signal the eclipse of the most 
colorful, the most typical and at one time the most 
important of all screen figures — the Hollywood cowboy. 
It looks like Hollywood is heading for the last 
round-up. 

For only within the past few weeks two of the three 
remaining rough riding stars have forsaken "West- 
erns." George O'Brien and Col. Tim McCoy have 

38 



William S. Hart made over a million dollars as a movie cow- 
boy. He is now resting and dreaming of past screen adventure 



Round- 



The day of the color- 
ful Western drama is 
past, and only one 
lone cowboy is left 

By Kirtley Baskette 



the same peg where hang the neglect -stiffened 
ropes of Jack Hoxie, Art Acord and " Bronco 
Billy" Anderson. 

And today in the town where fifteen years 
ago one studio, alone — Universal — had forty 
two-reel Westerns in production at once; 
where ten years ago a Western picture, "The 
Covered Wagon," was acclaimed one of the 
three greatest films ever produced; where at 
the same time a purely Western star, Tom 
Mix, signed the most fabulous contract of all 
time — today, one lone cowboy star, Ken 
Maynard, is riding, shooting, roping and res- 
cuing in genuine Western action plots for the 
camera. 

The Western, which for the past two dec- 
ades and more, ever since "Bronco Billy" 
Anderson glorified the range rider for the old 









Hoot Gibson, whose deeds of daring thrilled thousands and 
made him a national figure, recently filed a plea of bankruptcy 



Ken Maynard rides alone — the last Hollywood 
cowboy. Will he be able to keep alive on the 
screen the colorful legends of the old West? 



Essanay company back in Chicago, has supplied the 
backbone of the movies; has kept the gates of more 
than one studio open with its sure-fire revenue, and 
provided the training school for many of the screen's 
leading lights, both male and female — the Western 
"horse opera," which was the first type of picture 
Hollywood ever produced prolifically; which first 
spread its fame to the four corners of the globe ; which 
made all foreigners believe that every American 
wore a sombrero and toted a six-gun — this "cowboy 
thriller," the only purely native type of drama 
Hollywood ever produced, seems definitely destined 
for early extinction. 

Headed for the last round-up! 

Time was when you couldn't walk through the 
old "Water-Hole" district on Cahuenga Avenue, 
off Hollywood Boulevard, without snagging your 
trousers on the silver spurs of one of the milling 
cowpokes hanging around. For, only a few years 
ago, from five-hundred to a thousand bronc-busters 
were working steadily. Now if twenty work one day 
a week, it's a boom season. 

And the "Water-Hole," with its score or more of 
leather workers, silversmiths and saddle-makers, 
who used to stay up nights fashioning the decorative 
boots and belts and silver buckles, dear to every 
cowboy's heart, has dwindled to one lone boot shop 

30 



where English riding boots and polo equipment now constitute 
the major business. 

The cowboys themselves, many of them, have returned to 
the range to their forty-a-month and grub; others still wander 
around town, unable to forget the golden days, hanging on with 
other kinds of extra bits, working in riding academies, and on 
"dude" ranches. A few work in Westerns — -only a few. 

And the stars — 

"Bronco Billy" Anderson, never a real cowboy, but a screen 
daredevil who dressed in Western garb, is retired and living 
in San Francisco. "Wild Art" Acord, who used to fight all 
comers in the old corrals at Universal City, just for the fun of 
it, was killed a few years ago in a knife scrape in Mexico. Bill 
Hart, the Eastern stage actor who never did learn how to ride 
a bucking horse, but who made over a million dollars as a two- 
gun avenger, battles ill health on his Newhall ranch, near Holly- 
wood, and dreams of his glorious screen career which reached 
its apex in "Tumbleweeds." 

Tom Mix, the greatest of them all, who made his first 
"flicker" in 1911, and who signed one of the most amazing 
contracts ever made with Fox — for $10,000 a week and per- 
centages totaling another $5,000 — retired from his Universal 
contract last year and embarked on a personal appearance 
tour of one-night stands. 

Mix, the first genuine cowboy to become a screen star, 
epitomized the glory of the Western by becoming not only the 
highest paid and at one time the most independently wealthy 
of all Hollywood's luminaries, but by his unerring showman- 
ship, making the whole world cowboy-conscious. A former 
frontier marshal, soldier of fortune and ranger, he was toasted 
by royalty abroad, kept his horse, Tony, in the swankiest of 
European hotels and enjoyed an international opulence known 
to few of the cinema's past or present great. 

NO less than sixty-nine of his leading women, he ushered 
first into acting importance. The long list includes such 
names as Barbara LaMarr, Colleen Moore, Billie Dove, Clara 
Bow, Laura LaPlante and (believe it or not) Ann Pennington! 
And today, at somewhere between forty and fifty, Tom Mix 



is practically as good a man as he ever was, still fit for his re- 
markable riding stunts — but his last pictures didn't make 
money . This last year has seen him approaching financial straits. 

Hoot Gibson, another dyed-in-the-corral-dip steer wrangler, 
and one-time winner of the coveted Pendleton championship, 
has been practically out of pictures for two years. Recently 
he entered a bankrupt plea in a Los Angeles court. 

Buck Jones, who came from the "101 Ranch" to the screen 
via the big top, was forced to do "straight" parts last year. 
During his palmy days, Buck built up an organized following 
of over three million members in his "Buck Jones Rangers" 
club. It is still active, but the members are having a hard 
time seeing Buck on the screen in his old ranger roles. He 
doesn't do them any more. 

EVEN the fledglings, Tom Keene and Randolph Scott, have 
headed their horses over the hill with the setting sun. Tom, 
who made horse operas for two years for RKO-Radio has now 
taken back his former name of George Duryea, and trimmed 
down his sombrero for straight romantic roles. Randy Scott's 
run of Zane Grey stories is finished and Paramount has given 
him no more Western assignments. 

Now, you ask, why is all this? 

Is it because the kids refuse to be kidded by out-dated 
Western gunmen? Is the horse passe? Is the young American, 
and old American as well, too sophisticated, too modern to get 
a "kick" out of a plunging mustang or a six-gun duel, any 
longer? 

Possibly. Yet, the fiction magazines are full of Western 
stories. Western books are still popular. True, the West, 
the wild West is gone — it was gone before a moving picture 
camera was ever invented — but its legend and romance are 
not; its hardy, interesting characters are not. 

Ken Maynard, who came to pictures as a trick riding 
champion from a wild West show and stayed to make and keep 
more money than any of his predecessors or contemporaries, 
and who remains as the sole active and exclusively Western star 
in Hollywood today, has some ideas on the subject. 

[ PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 98 ] 




Claudette Colbert and Clark Gable are ready to go— baggage and all. But they don't seem to be in a great 
hurry. Director Frank Capra is giving them advice on the side. The trio are working on "Night Bus" 



W 




Clarence Sinclair Bull 



PRETTY Polly — and pretty Lupe — finish off their swim with a 
little conversation. The parrot is only one of Lupe's many pets. 
She has two doss, a cat, several birds and a whole school of sold 
fish. The combination makes some of Lupe's suests nervous. They 
expect the doss to chase the cat, and the cat to eat the birds 





"THOUSANDS were tested, and Ann 
• Sothern was chosen. It will be her first 
movie, too — the lead in Columbia s mu- 
sical, Lets Fall in Love. Ann comes 
from Broadway. Her name there was Har- 
riette Lake. Studio officials said the name 
was too cold and formal to bring her movie 
fame, and so advised her. So she chose 
Sothern because of her esteem for the 
late E. H. Sothern, Shakespearean actor 

MR. EDMUND LOWE is usin S all his 
powers of persuasion, but Ann can t 
quite make up her mind. In Let s Fall in 
Love," Ann is a young girl, working in a 
circus concession. Eddie, as a motion 
picture director, sees her there, and begs 
her to place herself in his hands and let 
him train her for stardom. But the proposi- 
tion sounds a bit suspicious to Ann, and 
she won't give him an answer in a hurry 




"Let's Fall in Love P 
It's the name of the 
show — not an invita- 
tion. But it lured a 
Broadwav blonde! 



Photographs by 
William A. Fraker 






EDDIE points out to Ann all the excite- 
ment of life in Hollywood — handsome 
heroes, dancing feet, the grinding of cam- 
eras, the Rare of Klieg lights, the joy of 
fame. The impressionistic study of Holly- 
wood in the background was designed by 
William A. Fraker, Columbia camera artist. 
It expresses the rhythm, the glamour, the 
swift tempo which make up the scin- 
tillating, varied pattern of the movie city 

SO Ann is convinced. But it isn't the 
exciting promises of Hollywood that 
lure her from the circus. Nor is it the as- 
surance of fame. Oh, no! At least, not 
in this movie. Ann goes because she falls 
.in love with Eddie! Of course, inciden- 
tally, a star's salary will come in handy, and 
it's fun to be famous. But "Let's Fall in 
Love'' is gay and delightfully romantic, 
and not to be bothered with high finance 




Anthony Ugrin 



IRENE BENTLEY got into the movies without trying. She went over 
to Fox to watch a screen test and when a girl was needed for a bit 
of action, jokingly offered her services. Fox officials noticing her in 
the test, wired her to come to Hollywood. She left two days later 
for a part in My Weakness, and is now playing the lead in Smoky 



John, the 






Great 






What a show- 
man and what a 
wit Barrymore 
proves himself 

By Charles 
Darnton 



YOU have to call your shots with John 
Barrymore. Usually, I do. But this 
time, when he wasn't looking, I just 
banged away and left myself right 
behind the eight ball, with: 

"Do you plan to end your career on the 
stage?" 

Of course, I knew he'd catch me at it. But 
I choked on my beer in his dressing-room as 
he raised a baleful eye from his Irish stew — 
race will tell! — and bitingly observed: 

"Up to this aging moment I had felt com- 
paratively young. But your question has a 
distinct, not to say disturbing, mortuary 
sound. I am surprised at you, particularly 
after giving you a glass of beer." 

Silence fell on the scene and the stew alike 



„ 



yji 



:& 



h 



I 



It was a swordfish that, according to John Barrymore, took 
him into pictures. At left, the inimitable John is shown 
with lovely Helen Chandler in "Long Lost Father," for 
which he was borrowed from M-G-M by RKO-Radio 



as, with sudden loss of appetite, Mr. Barrymore stabbed a 
jaundiced carrot, rolled a pallid onion over on its back, then 
morbidly studied an anemic potato. 

"It's the appalling finality of that phrase, 'end your career'," 
he muttered. "Did you, if I may ask, remember to bring the 
cyanide?" 

In the desperate circumstances there was only one thing to 
do, turn my unhappy question in another direction. And a 
lucky turn it was, for it brought forth unexpected and momen- 
tous news. [ PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 92 ] 



CAT A ' The Monthly 



YORK 



Announcing 



Broadcast oj 



f^ ARBO may be the world to her public, but 
^-^she sometimes makes it tough on those who 
follow her around. The great Greta visited a 
dude ranch near Victorville, California, not 
long ago, insisting on absolute privacy until the 
manager had to ask her to move on when the 
rest of the guests complained about being 
shooed out of the way every time she took a 
walk. 

""LTOW was the opening?" a friend 
asked Jimmy Gleason, anent a 
certain picture. 

"Colossal!" declared Jimmy. 
"Better than that — it was mediocre !" 

OLLYWOOD'S heart went out to Isabel 
Jewell during Lee Tracy's troubles in Mex- 

"If only he'd been good 'till I got there," 
Isabel moaned. 

In fact, she was all ready to leave for Mexico 
when the news of Lee's arrest flashed through 
to Hollywood. 

Some friends, thinking to cheer her up, took 
Isabel to a night club. 

"Will you please play Lee's favorite?" she 
begged the orchestra leader. 

" Of course, " he said, " what is it? " 

" It's ' Melancholy Baby,' " she said and wept 
through the whole number. 




You have to be a director to get in on a 
job like this! There are strings to it! 
Rowland V. Lee assisted Lilian Harvey 
with lacing her boots for a rope-walk- 
ing scene in Fox's "I Am Suzanne." 
That's why the leather toes are forked 



UP rushed the usual mob of autograph 
seekers when Joan Crawford and Fran- 
chot Tone stepped out of a New York 
theater. Joan was near to getting writer's 
cramp from scribbling her name on the slips of 
paper thrust before her. 

Suddenly she paused. The slip she was 
about to sign was an I. O. U. 

" I can't sign this," she said. 

"Why not?" the man demanded impu- 
dently. 

Joan was still courteous. "I got into an awful 
jam once for autographing a blank check by 
mistake." 

The fellow went away muttering about Joan 
being high-hat. 

"\X7HEN Evelyn Venable was 
touring with Walter Hampden 
in Shakespearean repertory, this hap- 
pened in Baltimore. Evelyn came to 
the famous line, "Hey, Nonnie, 
Nonnie — " 

And the gallery, as a man, chanted 
back— "and a Hot, Cha, Cha!" 



The old gentleman getting his beard trimmed is John Boles. Jack Pierce, 
studio cosmetician, has just finished aging Boles with a little make-up. 
The beard was for a scene in Universal's recent release, "Beloved" 



Jf6 



Hollywood Goings-On! 



HpHERE was no more beautiful girl at the May- 
fair Ball, Hollywood's greatest social event, 
than Virginia Gilbert, Jack's wife. She wore a 
gown of pink and silver lame with a long train, and 
her blonde hair wound in braids about her 
head. 

A cape-wrap of silver fox completed the cos- 
tume. In their party were the Countess di 
Frasso and Lyle Talbot. 

•"[""HE very first couple to arrive were Mr. 
and Mrs. John Barrymore, a very hand- 
some pair but who looked as if they wished 
these things would get started earlier, so they 
could go home. 

Dolores was radiantly beautiful in a white 
gown with a long train which she looped grace- 
fully over her arm as she danced with her hus- 
band — all alone on the floor, at first. 

John was dressed in his soup and fish and ac- 
coutered in bedroom slippers and dark glasses. 

•THE most fashionably late arrivals were 
George Raft and Carole Lombard, who 
showed up around one a. m. and put on a tango 
that stopped everything. 

' I '\VO stunning examples of masculine physi- 
cal perfection stood side by side at the 
Mayfair, the same height and about the same 
build. When they turned around, the im- 




Fresh from his Mexican adventure, Lee Tracy arrived in Hollywood looking 
happy. He's reassuring Isabel Jewell, who was waiting at the train gate, 
that all will be well. Isabel and Lee are seen very frequently together 



And twenty minutes later he was yell- 
ing, "Help! I've been robbed!" Oh, 
yes. It's good exercise that Mr. 
William Gargan takes. And it keeps 
him physically fit. But it does sort of 
strew his valuables all over the lawn 



pressed bystander discovered them to be 
Johnny Weissmuller and Tommy Meighan. 
Lupe wore black velvet with quarts of rubies. 

T\ 7TIILE in New York, Joan Crawford, un- 
vv wittingly upset, very, very much, another 
famous star. 

Marilyn Miller was doing those cute imper- 
sonations in the Broadway success "As Thou- 
sands Cheer," and one of Marilyn's specialties 
is her imitations of Crawford. 

But Marilyn didn't know the famous "Dan- 
cing Lady'' was in the house, though the 
audience did. And Joan was the cynosure of 
all eyes, eager to see just how Joan was taking 
it. Marilyn was getting no laughs and little 
attention. It wasn't until afterwards she 
learned the audience was too busy looking at 
the real stuff. 

XTO lover's spat was the breaking up of the 
long Donald Cook-Evalyn Knapp engage- 
ment. Neither has spoken to the other since 
they stopped going together, although they 
have frequently been thrown together. 



47 



Starry futures ahead, but 




Cortez doing the minuet with the rotund Archie 
Mayo. That afternoon they found out, for the 
announcement of Ricardo's engagement to 
Mrs. Christine Lee appeared in the papers. 

They will probably be married by the time 
you read this. 

OURPRISING their friends in Hollywood, 
.Alice White and Sidney Bartlett were mar- 
ried at the old Pronto Ranch in Mexico. In 
the ancient town hall, where many famous 
weddings have taken place, and with the 
governor of Mexico attending, little blonde 
Alice became Mrs. Bartlett. 

A ND Fifi Dorsay finally did it, too. Mau- 
Vice Hill, son of a Chicago manufacturer, 
was (and is) the lucky bridegroom. 

MAE WEST has a new "chimp " to take the 
place of the pet monkey that died recently. 
"Chimp" learned to push elevator buttons 
and life has become miserable for the elevator 
boys in Mae's apartment. The monkey will 
hop up and down stairs ringing for elevators on 
every floor and running before the boys get 
there. "Let the kid have his fun," smiles Mae. 

T OUISE FAZENDA and her baby 
"^have been resting at Palm 
Springs. "I happened to glance out 
of my window the first morning," 
Louise said, "and who was going by 
but a Marx brother." 

"What did you do?" she was asked. 

"Do?" ejaculated Louise. "Why, 
I grabbed the baby and hid with it." 

D ALPH MORGAN went to see his daughter, 
^■Claudia, in the Broadway play, "Thorough- 
bred." But, how he wanted to get out! It 



Shirley Mason, once a favorite star, 
gave up her career and fame to take 
care of her tiny daughter, Sheila Mary 
Lanfield. When urged to go back on 
the screen, Shirley laughs and says, 
"No, thank you. I like this job better !" 



/^ORA SUE COLLINS, little six-year-old 
^^actress working in "As The Earth Turns," 
paid a great deal of attention when she heard 
that Sarah Padden, who plays in the same 
picture, wore pads to make her appear fat. 
Cora Sue stole over to her mother and whis- 
pered, "Do you think her name is really 
Padden, or do they just call her that because 
she has to wear all those pads? " 

'TPHE conversation at a certain din- 
ner party the other night drifted 
around to Joan Crawford's frank 
statement that Franchot Tone was 
teaching her how to act for the stage. 

"And did Lenore Ulric teach you 
how to act?" a young woman across 
the table asked Lenore's former hus- 
band, Sidney Blackmer. 

"Oh no," Sidney said with a smile, 
"she just taught me how to behave." 

" W/ 1 * 7 ^ in the world is a11 the fun about? " 
^^ Visitors at the First National Studio 

asked when they saw the very quiet Ricardo 

48 




Boris Karloff, director of the Screen Actors' Guild, greets its youngest 
member— Sunny Waterman. Karloff can't make the baby actor laugh, or 
even smile, so he thinks Sunny has a future as a dead-pan comedian 



What do the grown-ups think? 



wasn't professional jealousy. Ralph was feel- 
ing faint, the effect of a close steam-heated 
theater after that balmy California air. Ralph 
began to grow panicky, fearful he would have 
to walk out on his daughter's performance. 

He gritted his teeth, dug his nails into the 
plush chair cushion and swore, "I will not 
faint. I will not leave." The stage was a 
blur. Ralph went up the aisle on wobbly legs. 

"Charming — lovely — very interesting," he 
smiled weakly as his friends eagerly asked him 
how he liked the play. 

T ATEST thing in souvenir-collecting: A 
woman rushed up to Jean Harlow at a recent 
theater opening in Los Angeles and asked, 
"May I have that cigarette when you're 
through with it, please?" Rather disconcerting 
for Jean to think of the exhibits neatly tagged 
that it must be destined to join. But the 
print of those perfect lips is worth the trouble, 
collectors will tell you. 

QECILIA PARKER, that pretty 
little blonde who used to be out 
at Universal, is now Andy Clyde's 
leading lady, in Educational come- 
dies. And being in comedies, she 
has to keep in training. So the other 
day she entered a Hollywood store 
and asked the clerk for a pair of 
shorts for her gymnasium. 

"Yes, miss," answered the clerk, 
"and what size is your gymnasium?" 

T\ TALLY BEERY was much too busy on 
W that eventful trip with the "Viva Villa" 
company to get into trouble or know much 
about those who did. Wally was busy buying 
dolls and toys in the Mexican shops. His 
little daughter, Carol Ann, is Wally's pride and 





The Harold Lloyds apparently have no cinematic dreams for their children. 
They carefully keep them away from movie cameras. But the photographer 
caught Harold in the act of showing Harold, Jr., how to shoot marbles 



Little Marianne and her mother, 
Lucille Edwards, are filmdom's newest 
screen team. They are playing to- 
gether in "Orient Express." Thus, 
Marianne's screen training begins 
early — literally, at her mother's knee 



joy and his every idle moment was spent in 
hunting gifts for her. 

Y\ 7HILE Gary Cooper was in New York, 
^* he was invited by the Associated Motion 
Picture Advertisers to one of their Thursday 
luncheons. 

Gary, nervous as an extra at a try-out, was 
called upon to speak. He got up, struggled for 
a start and just as he was about to emit his 
first word, a waiter tripped with a huge tray of 
dishes which caused a reverberating clatter 
throughout the room. That completely fin- 
ished Gary's equilibrium. But he was actor 
enough to turn the accident into an alibi. He 
made a low bow in the direction of the waiter 
and said, "Gentlemen, I give the floor to my 
good friend here." Then he sat down. And 
the waiter isn't over the thrill of it yet. 

"pIGURE it out any way you like — but the 
Paramount Westerns and Mae West made 
more money for that lot than any other pro- 
ductions last year. 

[ PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 96 ] 




TheP 



assm 




<i,\. 



Fat, or skinny, 
they all wear pants 
like Marlene's — 
cluttered with dia- 
monds, Mae okays 
curves — Oakie swoons 
when Peggy Joyce chisels 
two orchids — DeMille cracks 
his whip, and the leopards fall 
dead — and it's hello and goodbye 
with Constance and her Marquis 




Dietrich, the Marlene, leads the show wearing the famous trousers, 
coat and tie. A chorus of trousers-clad girls trot on from all direc- 
tions. Some are fat and some are lean and nobody's pants fit. 
But Marlene's. They go into a quick "Off to Buffalo" that rips 
the seat in practically every pair of trousers and the audience 
groans in memory of the pants-wearing episode. 
The producers, wearing bright red hunting coats (for no reason), 
go into their famous yearly shuffle with Sammy Katz trying to find 
his place in the line-up. He never does. The boys join hands and 
skip coyly around singing, "Who's afraid of the big, bad banker; 
big, bad banker; big, bad banker?" Sammy Goldwyn accom- 
panies them on the flute. Three notes off key. 
The audience rises and screams as Mae West hip-slinks on. Mae 
is the diamond-studded star of the year, bringing an epidemic of 
"Come up and see me sometime!" that swept the country like 
wildfire. People, who have never been invited anywhere, are 
suddenly urged to "Come up sometime!" Anytime! An 
entire world goes about insisting that people come up some- 
time. 

There's a sudden hush as the black-hooded figure of bad 
luck, wearing Harpo Marx's red wig, still pursues the same 
little blonde. The hoodoo is again after Mae Clarke who, 
this time, flies through the windshield of Phil Holmes' 
car, breaking her jaw J ''Bon voyage," cries the town 
as Irving Thalberg and Norma Shearer sail for Europe. 
The ship's whistle sounds, strong hands are at the 
gang-plank, when suddenly a tiny figure in a 
White Sister's" robe comes tearing across the 
stage. "Wait! Wait for me!" she cries. 
Helen Hayes makes a last minute leap from 
the set to the boat and accompanies Norma 
and Irving. 
A sudden lurch. What's that? A tear- 
ing, haunting sound. Actors scream. 
The theater sways. Chandeliers 
swing perilously above. The audi- 
ence gasps in terror. 
Earthquake! 
The whole stage is a seething 
mass of confusion. Actors, 
wrapped in sheets and 
clutching babies upside 
down, go tearing 
about in circles. 
Gary Cooper 



ONCE again the stage is set! 
Another year rolls around and 
Hollywood puts on its big Revue of 
1933. New names flicker brightly on 
the theater marquee. The red carpet is unrolled 
and the plush seats are dusted. 

Slowly the orchestra files into the pit. Behind the 
curtain there's the usual flutter and hubbub. Electri- 
cians, actors, directors and their assistants, producers 
fly madly about. 

An air of hushed excitement fills the place. Behind the 
scenes the white blur of an actor's face, ill with the despair of a de-^ 
parted year, contrasts strangely with the clinking jewelry of a tri- 
umphant Mae West. 

Another year! 1933 with all its joys, sorrows, surprises, disappointments, 
heartaches and great triumphs, is about to be enacted for the eager spectators. 
The great white light of Publicity is once more turned on, the orchestra finishes 
the overture, and Mr. and Mrs. Public sit tensely in their plush chairs — 

And the magnificent, varicolored curtain very slowly rises on "Hollywood's Revue of 1933" 

50 




5how of 33 



Hearty laughs, bitter tears — Holly- 
wood shared both during 1933 

By Sara Hamilton 



ILLUSTRATED Ii\ FRANK DOB1AS 



protrudes five feet from beneath a davenport upon which Kay 

Francis sleeps peacefully on. Through it all. 

Gradually the hubbub subsides when a bevy of newsboys 
"Joan Crawford divorces Doug 
"Doug and Joan part forever!'' 
and Doug takes to his papa. In 



come screaming on. 
Fairbanks!" they call. 
Joan takes to her bed 
Europe. 

With a loud resounding bang, the doors of the banks close 
The bank holiday is on. Valets, butlers, maids come to the 
rescue of empty pocketed stars, handing out hundred dollar 
bills. I. O. U.'s (none good) flood the town. Famous 
stars who haven't shaved themselves in years give 
"shave yourself parties and invite everyone up. To 
the slaughter of the profiles. 

Cracking whips and wearing Simon Legree mus- 
taches, the producers leap on in a little salary cut 
number. "You'll take a cut and like it, hah! 
hah! hah!'' they snarl, while actors dressed as 
Uncle Toms sit about the fields of the m i 

Cotton Club and weep. The four Marx 
Brothers, as bloodhounds, come baying 
and leaping across chorus girls, un- 
dressed as ice-cakes, while Eddie 
Cantor, as a little Kosher Eva in a 
blonde wig, goes up to heaven 
To see Mae sometime. 

Lionel Barrymore burps 
through practically every 
M-G-M production of the 
year. 1933 will go down 
in history as the year of 
the Barrymore burps. 

There's a sudden 
spurt of night life 





The White Sis- 
ter races for the 
gangplank — the 
Ames - Cabot - Adri- 
enne triangle is squared 
— even Hollywood is 
scared of an earthquake 
- Baby Le Roy learns to 
say, "Nuts" — and three little 
pigs, instead of going to market, 
take a trip all around the world 



with the Colony Club opening full blast. 
The Vendome restaurant, with two hams in 
the window, one in a pink ribbon and one in 
blue (Wheeler and Woolsey in disguise), opened 
its doors. A rush of costume parties fill it almost 
nightly. 
Alice Brady and her four dogs walk in unexpectedly 
and stay. All five a riot. Peggy Joyce wheedles two 
orchids out of Jack Oakie and nearly passes out with the 
effort required. Jack immediately puts on a clean collar and 
a new suit. It stops the show. Even the orchestra falls pros- 
trate at the sight. 
A hushed silence. Heads are bowed in memory of a man who died 
of a broken heart. Fatty Arbuckle has gone to join that happy-go- 
lucky little trouper of the old Sennett days, Mabel Normand. Only Chaplin 
remains of that famous trio. 
The actors now clear the stage as the famous animal act of 1933 comes marching on. 
Cecil B. De Mille leads the parade, yelling through a plum colored megaphone and lead- 
ing four passionate leopards (to be used for love scenes only) [ please turn to page 116 ] 



51 




***| 






Everybody's 
Stooging 

Now 



lill 


-jm 


i 



Sometimes they're yes-men; some- 
times they're no-men. But many 
a stooge is making many a star 
toe the mark in Hollywood 

By Kirtley Basket te 



Jimmy Donnelly has been Al 
Jolson's stooge for fifteeny ears. 
His duties include giving Jol- 
son advice and playing a card 
game with him every evening 



CHARLIE RUGGLES, 
reaching for a tempting tray 
of French pastries, found 
his arm gently but firmly 
arrested in its eager post-prandial 
movement. 

"No," reproved Lester. 

"But I want that eclair, I tell 
you. I — " 

"No," repeated Lester with quiet 
finality, "our diet strictly forbids 
pastries. We must regain our 
health." A brief struggle of wills; 
two glaring eyes, and the tray waft- 
ed away with its fluffy dainties un- 
touched. Lester had said "No." 

Lester is Charlie Ruggles' 
stooge. 

And though stooge may be a 
horrid word, it's also getting to be 
a household word in Hollywood. A 
star without his own particular 
stooge is like — well, pretzels minus 
beer, or movies without sound. You 
simply must have a stooge to rate 
at all today. 

What is a stooge ? You ask with 
good reason, for certainly nowhere 
else in this world will you run across 
the word as you do in Hollywood. 

If Hollywood possessed its own private dictionary, its 
definition of the term would probably run something like this: 

"Stooge: A person whose life revolves in the orbit of a screen 

52 



\: 



rV 



Jack Oakie gives his stooge, "Cracker" Henderson, the hot foot 



star. A shadow, an echo. A self-appointed critic, one-man 
audience and praise agent. A sometimes yes-man, and at 
other times no-man. Any person varying in big-shotness from 



a studio errand boy to a five 
figure salaried manager, who 
has received a star's confidence 
and trust, and the glories 
therein." 

Clear? No? Well, let's pro- 
ceed anyway. 

Ted Healy, glorifier of the 
professional stooge, applied the 
word to his many accomplices 
who are "fall guys," "feeders" 
and butts for his gags. In the- 
atrical parlance, the term has 
long denoted a "plant" or curs- 
ory accomplice — the kind of 
crazy looking gent who heckles 
from the audience, or feigns a 
fight for a laugh. 

But Hollywood, just to be 
original, has distorted the term 
to include persons of various 
and vicarious virtues. In fact, 
almost any catalogued or mys- 
terious person hanging around 
a star becomes his or her 
stooge to the rest of the town. 

The Lester noted above for 
his dietary restrictions, hasbeen 
Charlie Ruggles' stooge for the 
past ten years. It is very doubt- 
ful if Charlie could tool along 
without Lester, he's so used to 
him. They were on the stage 
together many years ago before 
the Ruggles rocket flared, and 
today — well, he is practically 
Charlie's other self. Even 
speaks of Charlie as "we." 
When Paramount employees 
hear a helpless, petulant 
"Where's Lester?" they know 
that Charlie is completely hors 
de combat until his stooge can 
be located. 

Just as they know that noth- 
ing is okay with Oakie unless 
"Cracker" Henderson is stoog- 
ing around. "Cracker," a sour 
visaged, gangling Southerner, 




Ted Healy's stooges are among the most famous professional ones. 
Here is Ted with his three "feeders" as they appear in "Dancing Lady" 



George Raft is one of the stoogiest 
stars in Hollywood. On the left is 
stooge Sammy Finn, ladies' wear mag- 
nate, known in Hollywood as "The 
Killer." At right is stooge Mack Gray 



news-hawked on a Florida newspaper until 
he impulsively decided to hit for Holly- 
wood. 

A job on the Paramount labor gang 
led to work on the set with Jack Oakie, 
and there his molasses-mouthed, heavy, 
Georgia Cracker drawl earned him the sec- 
tional sobriquet, in addition to capturing 
Jack's attention. 

The story of their meeting is classic. 

Jack, always on the lookout for a gag, 
danced up to the sad-looking swamp angel, 
as the set crowd, sensing fun, gathered 
round. 

"Where you from, son?" he asked cockilv. 

"Maine," replied "Cracker" in sepulchral 
tones. 

Oakie blinked — and bit. 

"Maine? With that accent?" 

[ PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 117 ] 



53 




"Sex rules Hollywood," says Doug Fairbanks, Jr. It ssems to rule this scene with Diana Napier in "Catherine the Great" 

Why I Quit Hollywood 

TJ 



By Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. 

In an interview with Kathlyn Hoyden 



"F there were no 
other reason — and 
there are plenty of 
"others — 'Morning 
Glory' would be enough 
by itself." 

Douglas Fairbanks, 
Jr., made this answer to my request for an explanation of his 
having decided never again to appear in a Hollywood-made 
picture. 

"My part in 'Morning Glory,'" Fairbanks went on, "wasn't 
even a fair leading man's. Like all the others in the cast I was 
only a stooge for Katharine Hepburn. Menjou hated what he 
had to do quite as much as I did. He knew what it was doing 

54- 



to him — how it was 
damaging him with his 
followers. 

" It was only because 
Katharine Hepburn is 
the swellest person in 
Hollywood that Men- 
jou and I didn't walk off the set the first day. But she was so 
marvelous in the fattest star role a girl ever sank her teeth into 
that we simply couldn't let her down. 

"It would be silly for me to suggest I didn't know what I 
was doing when I accepted the role. The fact that Katharine 
and I were co-starred didn't fool me. It had to be all Hepburn 
from start to finish. The story [ please turn to page 100 ] 




/^■LARA BOW smiles right past the movie camera, 
^'and doesn't even give it a tumble! After she 
finished "Hoopla," Clara settled down for a nice, long 
rest. Now she can loaf on a movie set and watch other 
players hard at work. That's a real vacation for a star 




Select Your Pictures and You Won't 




* 



DANCING LADY—M-G-M 



TOP-NOTCH entertainment that should please the ma- 
jority of movie-goers. A musical production with the 
usual backstage atmosphere — which differs only in that it 
has an interesting story woven through it. 

As Janie, a young dancer who makes her way (through 
the kindnesses of Franchot Tone, wealthy playboy) from 
burlesque to lead in a Broadway musical directed by Patch 
Galleghcr, Joan Crawford gives an admirable performance. 

Clark Gable, as the hard-boiled director, is well cast. 
May Robson, Winnie Lightner, Sterling Holloway, Ted 
Healy and his stooges all do fine work. Art Jarrett and Nel- 
son Eddy lend effective vocal accompaniment. 

The dance scenes are dazzling in extravagant splendor. 
Fred Astaire and Joan are a perfect complement. 




* 



ALICE IN WONDERLAND— Paramount 



TO lovers of Lewis Carroll's story of "Alice," this picture 
will be a source of great amusement with each familiar 
character coming into being. All the charm, all the whim- 
sical nonsense has been caught by the camera. Children 
will be delighted. 

Gary Cooper, as the White Knight, Jack Oakie and Roscoe 
Karns as Tweedledum and Tweedledee, May Robson, Louise 
Fazenda, Edna May Oliver as the Queens, and a host of other 
movie favorites flit in and out of Alice's dream. 

In this fantasy of the most highly imaginative quality, 
Charlotte Henry makes a believable and charming Alice. 

Settings and costumes are perfect. 

A technical achievement, skillfully directed by Norman 
McLeod. 

56 



The 



Shad 



ow 




A Review of the New Pictures 




* 



COUNSELLOR-AT-LAW— Universal 



A TRULY superb picture, from every angle — story, cast, 
direction and production. 

John Barrymore plays George Simon, a part really worthy 
of the performance he gives it. He is magnificent as the 
man who climbed from the Ghetto to the position of greatest 
lawyer in New York, with luxuriously beautiful offices. 

And things happen in those offices — fascinating, human, 
dramatic things. Never a dull moment, up to and through 
the time Simon is threatened with disbarment — and is on 
the brink of suicide. From the gabby telephone operator, 
done to a turn by Isabel Jewell, to the inner sanctum 
where Barrymore holds forth, things go on. 

Bebe Daniels is a real, efficient and understanding secre- 
tary, secretly in love with her employer. Doris Kenyon is 
the selfish society wife. These are not rubber-stamp por- 
trayals or parts. They seem fresh and new. Onslow Stevens, 
as Simon's partner; Melvyn Douglas, his wife's special 
friend; Thelma Todd, a client, and Vincent Sherman, as the 
Communist boy who does a forceful bit of lecturing, are all 
excellent in their roles. 

Down to the merest bit-player, each performance is a gem 
of perfection. Every member should be mentioned — but 
the cast is much too long. The direction is capably handled 
by William Wyler. 

If you want a thrilling, emotion-stirring evening, don't 
miss this picture! 






Have to Complain About the Bad Ones 



The Best Pictures of the Month 



COUNSELLOR-AT-LAW 
DANCING LADY 
BELOVED 
CONVENTION CITY 



ROMAN SCANDALS 

ALICE IN WONDERLAND 

GALLANT LADY 

THE RIGHT TO ROMANCE 



The Best Performances of the Month 

John Barrymore in "Counsellor-at-Law" 

Eddie Cantor in "Roman Scandals" 

Joan Crawford in "Dancing Lady" 

Clark Gable in "Dancing Lady" 

John Boles in "Beloved" 

Ann Harding in "Gallant Lady" 

Clive Brook in "Gallant Lady" 

Ann Harding in "The Right to Romance" 

Genevieve Tobin in "Dark Hazard" 

Paul Lukas in "By Candlelight" 

Will Rogers in "Mr. Skitch" 
Jimmy Cagney in "Lady Killer" 

Casts of all photoplays reviewed will be found on page 124 




ft 



ROMAN SCANDALS— 
Samuel Goldwyn-United Artists 



ANOTHER Eddie Cantor triumph. With a bevy of the 
most beautiful girls ever assembled in a musical ex- 
travaganza on stage or screen. 

In producing "Roman Scandals," Samuel Goldwyn at- 
tempted something "different" from the customary type of 
musical, and succeeded. 

Ruth Etting, of radio fame, sings only one song, "No 
More Love," but it's the biggest number in the show and 
she does her job grandly. Ruth takes the part of Olga, the 
Emperor's discarded favorite. 

Nothing has been spared to make this production striking 
in every detail. You will see some of the most lavishly 
dressed sets and undoubtedly the most undressed beauties 
yet shown. 

It is chuck full of Cantor laughs. Even though the tunes 
are few, you will thoroughly enjoy each one. 

A pleasant change is that the comedy depends entirely 
on situations. 

Better than "The Kid from Spain," it seems to be over in 
a great hurry. That is because it holds you every minute to 
the grand finish. 

Gloria Stuart, in a long blonde wig, David Manners, 
Yerree Teasdale, Edward Arnold, Alan Mowbray are excel- 
lent. The dances are effectively staged by Busby Berkeley. 

The big punch is saved for the end — a chariot race that 
will put any audience on the edge of its seats! 




ft 



BELOVED— Universal 



A TENDER epic of a musician's life and soul. 
Vienna-born John Boles flees revolution to America's 
South, fights for the Confederacy and carries his Southern 
love, Gloria Stuart, with him on a life of frustrated musical 
ambition. Plagued by poverty, forced to debauch his art for 
a living, and weathering the disappointment of a worthless 
son, he lives to scorn his grandson's modern musical tri- 
umphs, but reaps his belated reward at the success of his 
life's work, the "American Symphony." 

Victor Schertzinger's deft direction and beautiful musical 
score vie with Boles' outstanding performance and Gloria's 
loveliness, to make this film unforgettable. 

Dorothy Peterson, Eddie Woods and Morgan Farley. 
Sets and scenery are as lovely as the haunting music. 




ft 



GALLANT LADY— 

20th Century-United Artists 



CLIVE BROOK'S excellent characterization of a social 
outcast might have stolen the picture, had not Ann 
Harding, as the gallant lady in distress, turned in a per- 
formance that simply could not be over-shadowed. 

The experiences of Ann, as the girl who faces disgrace 
through the death of her aviator fiance, supply a convinc- 
ing background for the excellent work of Otto Kruger 
who adopts Ann's child (Dickie Moore) and thus becomes 
an important link in the complicated chain of Ann's 
existence. 

Tullio Carminati lives up to all expectations, as a young 
Italian with whom Ann falls in love while in France. Betty 
Lawford handles a difficult role with finesse. Decidedly 
worth seeing. 

57 



The National Guide to Motion Pictures 



(REG. U. S. PAT. OFF.) 



ft 



CONVENTION 
CITY— 

First National 




* 



THE RIGHT 
TO 

ROMANCE— 
RKO-Radio 



YOU wanted a laugh, did you? Try this. A very down-to- 
earth convention in Atlantic City, with some of the boys 
whooping it up; Joan Blondell as a gold-digger, and Guy Kibbee 
having wife-trouble. Mary Astor does a grand traveling sales- 
woman role. Dick Powell, Frank McHugh, Adolphe Menjou 
and Patricia Ellis turn in splendid performances. It's so funny 
you'll scream. 



THE story of a woman plastic surgeon (Ann Harding) weary 
of success and hungry for love. She experiments with 
romance, and marriage, which fails, as you might well guess. 
Robert Young is the husband. Doctor Nils Asther, as the 
patient admirer, and Sari Maritza, as hubby's hey-hey play- 
mate, are well-cast. Harding in top form. Sophisticated; 
clever dialogue. 



SITTING 

PRETTY— 

Paramount 




DARK 
HAZARD— 
First National 



THIS just-so musical about two song writers who hitch-hike 
from New York to Hollywood (Jack Oakie and Jack Haley) 
is redeemed by five popular song numbers, an elaborate fan- 
dance chorus with novel mirror effects and a very good cast, 
including Ginger Rogers, Thelma Todd, the Pickens Sisters, 
Gregory Ratoff, Lew Cody, Art Jarrett and several others. 
Fair entertainment. 



THE story of a gambler who loved a dog too much and who 
thereby lost a woman. Genevieve Tobin marries Edward 
G. Robinson to "reform" him. She fails, but gives a grand 
performance trying. A greyhound, Dark Hazard, gets into his 
blood, to mingle with the "Dark Hazard," the racing fever. 
Genevieve helps herself to hubby's winnings and returns to 
an old suitor. Fine cast. 



jimmy and 
sally- 
Fox 




BY CANDLE- 
LIGHT— 
Universal 



YOU will be entertained and amused by Jimmy Dunn and 
Claire Trevor, as Jimmy, an egotistical publicity manager 
whose ideas invariably go haywire, and Sally, his secretary who 
loves him. Lya Lys sings "You're My Thrill." Claire is a 
grand actress who makes her character lovable and human. 
Many complications arise, but they're all ironed out in the end. 
Harvey Stephens. 

58 



A SUAVE Viennese comedy of manners, In which Nils 
Asther, a philandering prince, is a great success with the 
ladies, and gives ideas to his incomparable butler, Paul Lukas. 
Paul yearns for an affair with a "lady," and thinks he has found 
one in Elissa Landi. He pretends to be a prince, then discovers 
she is a ladies' maid, also masquerading. Done deftly and with 
great charm. 



Saves Yo ur Picture Time and Money 



MR. SKITCH 
—Fox 




YOU MADE 
ME LOVE 
YOU— 

Majestic 
Pictures 



THE Skitch family (Will Rogers, ZaSu Pitts) are dispos- 
sessed. So they start out for California in the old family 
rattler. Daughter Rochelle Hudson saves the day with a 
wealthy suitor. Florence Desmond's impersonations of well- 
known movie stars are nigh perfect, and are the high spots 
of the picture. The whole family will enjoy the Rogers' humor. 
A good supporting cast. 



MERRY England lives up to its name by sending us one 
of the most swift-paced, ridiculously funny musical 
farces seen in months. It is "The Taming of the Shrew" idea 
with Stanley Lupino marrying erratic Thelma Todd and trying 
to reform her on the honeymoon. You'll like the catchy tunes 
that punctuate the crazy, side-splitting situations. Worth any- 
one's time. 



MASTER 
OF MEN- 
Columbia 




IF I WERE 

FREE- 

RKO-Radio 



JACK HOLT'S too-rapid rise from mill hand to a big power 
in Wall Street goes to his head. Whereupon, wife Fay Wray 
brings about his financial ruin. And he returns once more to a 
humble beginning and happiness. Nothing new about the plot 
or the dialogue. Walter Connolly as Parker, a clever financier, 
does good work. Theodore Yon Eltz and Berton Churchill 
complete the cast. 



A SERIOUS drama of two people (Irene Dunne and Clive 
Brook) who find themselves embroiled in unhappy mar- 
riages, and turn to each other, hoping to find happiness. While 
the theme is not new, the acting is splendid, the lines clever. 
There are excellent moments with Nils Asther, the villainous 
husband, and Laura Hope Crews, Brook's mother. Not for 
children. 



BOMBAY 

MAIL— 

Universal 




1 




J* ^ 






^f «» % 


m~ 




k 












.^5jk 





LADY 

KILLER 

Warners 



A BAFFLING murder mystery aboard the Bombay Mail 
train, with Shirley Grey, Onslow Stevens, Ralph Forbes, 
Hedda Hopper and others under suspicion. Inspector Dyke 
(Edmund Lowe) outsmarts the culprit and, after many puzzling 
experiences, gets his man. A strong cast including John David- 
son, Tom Moore, Ferdinand Gottschalk and John Wray. If 
you like mysteries, here's your meat. 



IF you're a Cagney follower, you'll probably like this film, in 
which James, trying a new technique, drags Mae Clarke 
across the room by her hair. The story is unconvincing, but 
there's lots of action and fast comedy. It's Cagney's film, but 
Mae, Margaret Lindsay, as a famous movie star, and Leslie 
Fenton do good work. 

[ ADDITIONAL REVIEWS ON PAGE 106 ] 



59 




Mae West with Lyons Wickland in her stage success, "Sex." When Mae went 
to jail for this play, it was for the cast, not herself, that she was worried 



I'VE got something on the motion picture public! You have 
taken Mae West into your circle of favorite stars only in the 
last two years while I've been a Mae West admirer — well, 
for more years than perhaps the "Queen of Sex" would like 
to have me tell — and for more years than it may be wise for me 
to admit. But if you promise not to go mathematical and 
begin guessing ages — the date was 1912. 

I was 'steen years old and after school would drop into the 

60 



Back 

of the 

West 

Front 



Anecdotes of the 
great Mae of bygone 
days prove she has 
always been herself 

By Dana Rush 



Family Theater of Pittsburgh, a vaude- 
ville house which admitted me without 
charge because its manager, Clarence 
W. Morgenstern and his wife, were next 
door neighbors, but to those less fortu- 
nate, charged the huge sum of twenty- 
five cents. No, not a big time house, but 
a very much small time house which 
demanded five performances a day 
from its actors. 

In those days May (that's the way 
she spelled her name at that time) was 
one of the best ragtime singers that ever 
hit the Family Theater. And even 
though I was only 'steen years old, I 
knew she possessed "that something." 
The present hysteria for Mae West (for 
that's what the phenomenal popularity 
of the new film star amounts to) has 
been attributed to many things: SEX, 
spelled with capital letters; curves, with 
much emphasis on the roundness there- 
of; the revival of the gay nineties period. 
All have been set forth as an explanation 
for the big way in which the public has 
taken to the box-office which advertises 
the "Queen of Sex." But I suspect the 
cause is a more profound one. I would 
call it histrionic ability — not only before the Klieg lights, but 
behind the fountain pen or portable typewriter, whichever 
medium is used to turn out her dramas. For Mae West not 
only can act. She can write! Her talent in each amounts to a 
God-given genius, for neither has been developed along the 
usual lines. 

The author of "Sex," "Diamond Lil," and the latter's movie 
version, "She Done Him Wrong," [ please turn to page 109 ] 



Seen About Hollywood — 




PINS— such say 
ones as that 
worn by Kath- 
arine Hepburn 
in the form of a 
galloping 
rhinestone 
horse. Kate's 
hat and coat 
are made of 
waterproof 
cordu roy 
velvet 

TEATHERS 
I — like this 
jaunty one 
which was 
seen waving 
from Norma 
Shearer's little 
velvet hat at a re- 
cent evening par- 
ty. Norma's cos- 
tume was a smart 
affair of metal cloth 





HIBBON-clever- 
I>ly used for a 
necklace - brace- 
let set chosen by 
Una Merkel. You 
wear them like col- 
ar and cuffs and 
the ribbon, so trick- 
ily woven, isedged 
with silver balls 

Clarence Sinclair Bull 



TWIN pearl 
• bracelets— anoth- 
er stunning jewelry 
note sponsored by 
UnaMerkel. These, 
too, look like cuffs 
and are composed 
entirely of pearls 
strung on wire to 
give them that flare 



MATCHING 
bracelet and 
ring — this is a smart 
combination which 
Florine McKinney 
is wearing about 
town. The wide 
bracelet and big 
plaque ring are 
both in jade green 



TLORINE-also 
l wearingone huge 
bracelet of silver. 
These bracelets are 
increasingly popu- 
lar with the stars 
and are often worn 
one on each arm or 
several of them to- 
gether on one arm 



CTOCKING protectors 
O — these are a boon to 
sheer silk. Saves wear 
and tear. These footlets 
come in suntan shade and 
are completely conceal- 








Will Walling, Jr. 



SMART Hollywood is looking forward to a new season — and so are the costumes 
worn in pictures to be released soon. Travis Banton has designed a lovely dress for 
Evelyn Venable to wear in "Death Takes a Holiday." It is perfect for resort wear 
now and for first spring parties later on. Of mousseline de soie with tiers of ruffles 
edged with lace forming the sleeves and skirt. That front panel is tucked to the hem 



Forecasting the 

New Season from 

Screen Fashions 





JOT printed sheer fabrics down in your spring 
notes — and this dress in particular which Marian 
Marsh wears in "I Like It That Way." Vera has de- 
signed it in organza printed in a floral pattern of 
orange, green and yellow on a cream background. 
The short sleeves are covered with a ruffle and the 
neckline is edged with a smaller one as a collar 

Roman Freulich 

COTTONS will be at a peak this spring, especially 
in mesh or lacy weaves. Anticipating this, Travis 
Banton has designed this smart dress for Miriam 
Hopkins to wear in "All of Me." Gray mesh shot 
with a metal thread is fashioned into a slim daytime 
dress with long sleeves and high collar. Suede 
trimmed-with silver bars makes the tie and trick belt 

Eugene Robrrt Richee 




GALLANT LADY" brings a very chic Ann 
Harding to the screen. Gwen Wakeling has 
done a grand job in designing the clothes. The en- 
semble above, is one of the many costumes Ann 
wears. It is in redingote style with a simple black 
wool coat worn over a striped silk dress. The coat 
is held by a wide crushed leather belt in black 



NEED a suit to wear under your coat now and 
later without one? Here is the perfect one as 
worn by Claire Trevor in "Woman and the Law. 
Trim lines as Royer does them so well — in blue 
woolen, widely double-breasted effect and a candy 
striped satin scarf in red and white which ties at the 
throat then pulls through slots of jacket opening 



I 



* I 



Two Ensembles and 
A Suit for Spring 




HOLLYWOOD FASHIONS 

here sponsored by PHOTOPLAY Magazine and worn by famous 
stars in latest motion pictures, now may be secured for your own 
wardrobe from leading department and ready-to-wear stores in 
many localities. . . . Faithful copies of these smartly styled and 
moderately-priced garments, of which those shown in this issue 
of PHOTOPLAY are typical, are on display this month in the stores 
of representative merchants. 





AND here is a smart en- 
semble also worn by 
Ann Harding in Gallant 
Lady" — this, too, was de- 
signed by Gwen Wakeling. 
It is trimmed with grosgrain 
ribbon arranged in rows 
and cartridge pleated. The 
coat is seven-eighths length 
ending at a wide band of 
the ribbon which circles 
the skirt of the dress about 
four inches above the hem. 
This is a loose coat with 
small standing collar and 
wide bands of the ribbon 
on the sleeves. The dress 
has a yoke formed by al- 
ternating rows of the rib- 
bon, as shown in the sketch 




Checks Make 

New Pattern 

n Fashions 

This Spring 



I F it's checked this 
' spring, your cos- 
tume will be smart, 
for such a sound au- 
thority as Travis Ban- 
ton is using checked 
costumes in two new 
films. Gail Patrick in 
"Death Takesa Holi- 
day'' wears the 
checked silk en- 
semble above. Cape 
buttons onto the 
bodice of the simple 
dress. Blue and 
white is the color 

Eugene Robert Richee 




PvOROTHEA WIECK is 
L^a new fashion person- 
ality on the screen. In 
"Miss Fane's Baby Is 
Stolen " she wears a check- 
ed black and white swag- 
ger topcoat that will be 
ideal for your spring ward- 
robe. The wide collar is 
matched with revers and 
the fullness of the sleeves 
are gathered into straps 
which fasten just above 
the wrists. An inverted 
pleat gives back fullness 










HISTORY tells us that Catherine the Great shocked Russia by 
wearing men's attire. But this picture of Marlene Dietrich as 
Queen Catherine is very feminine. She looks lovely in ruffles. 
If the real Catherine wore a gown like this, we'll bet the toughest 
subject forgave the queen her occasional penchant for trousers 




Ru-m-11 Ball 



JACKIE COOPER looks as if he wanted to go out to play — and the 
director wouldn't let him. But Jackie had fun making his latest 
picture. After playing more or less ordinary boy parts for a time, 
Jackie was cast in a Western — on a big ranch with real cowboys, 
and a buckin broncho for himself! The film was Lone Cowboy 



<?<? 



Two 

Toughs 

from the 

Chorus 



Jimmy and Allen 
hot- footed it in 
'Pitter Patter." 
That's where Jimmy 
met the "missus" 



By Ben Maddox 



IN all the world there is nothing so quaint as a 
movie actor's past. But, until now, one James 
Cagney and one Allen Jenkins, who are hard-boiled 
— see? — hombres on the screen, have made no refer- 
ence to a certain chapter in their pre-fame days. 

To the very first chapter, to be explicit. 

They began — together — as chorus boys! 

You know how Jimmy and Allen wade through 
talkie plots. They approach their victims with the 
gala attitude of the two carefree members of the Three 
Little Pigs trio. 

Can't you just imagine Jimmy rubbing his hands 
with glee and singing under his breath, "We'll put him 
on the spot! " And Allen chortling, "We'll pull him bv 
the tail!" 

Yet, these two ten-minute eggs, who ad 
vise many a quaking fillum opponent 
where to head and aren't afraid of any 
big, bad man, got their theatrical 
impetus in — of all places — the 
chorus! 

The name of the show was 
"Pitter Patter," and try to 
fancy them in a spot like that! 

Today, pals of a dozen years' 
standing, and often profes- 
sional partners, Cagney is a 
front-row Hollywood star, 
with a Beverly Hills mansion 
which is complete from swim- 
ming pool to play-room. Jen- 
kins is a popular featured actor, 
a dignified resident of exclusive 
Brentwood Heights. Little did 
either of them suspect they'd ever 
be sitting so prettily when they first 
met back in 1921. 

"The show was playing Boston," Jimmy 




Pals of a dozen years standing, 
the only argument Cagney and 
Allen ever had was over a clean 
shirt. Each of them swears that 
the other is entirely unspoiled 
by Hollywood and film success 



recalls with that Irish twinkle in 

his eyes. "There were eight fellows 

in our routine and one boy had to 

drop out because his father died 

suddenly. 

"Allen had finished in another musical 

in Boston — I think he walked out on it! 

He came to [ please turn to page 110 ] 

69 




Working 
Girl 



"Work, to me, has always been a terribly serious matter, not to be trifled with" 



FUNNY, isn't it? That you've never heard much about 
Myrna Loy. That you don't hear much to this day. 
That you probably never will, even if she becomes a star 
of the first magnitude, which is not at all impossible. 
For she is about to start her starring career for M-G-M, in 
"Stamboul Quest." 

Check back over the past eight years, the eight years during 
which Myrna Loy has been a definite screen personality. 
Remember any time when her name or her fame rocketed 
skyward, suddenly? Anytime when the word "sensational" 
could have possibly branded either her professional or her 
private life? Yet, undoubtedly, she is a great favorite with 
millions of theater-goers. Undoubtedly 
she holds a very secure place in the -^ j^- 
front rank of screen actresses. Jjy JS-BTITI 

70 



Exotic Myrna 
Loy keeps a 
sane head on 
those pretty 
shoulders 



Undoubtedly she is a person 
unique in the annals of Holly- 
wood history. 

Myrna Loy is Hollywood's 
working girl. 

Since she set out at seven- 
teen to earn her own living in 
a town where it is at the same 
time the easiest and the hardest 
thing to do, she has faced and 
solved the same problems which 
are faced and solved by a 
thousand other working girls 
throughout the country every 
year. 

NOT that Myrna is a dull 
person obsessed with the 
idea of success via the plugging, 
plodding route. On the con- 
trary, she is a very lively lady 
to whom life holds out many 
diverting and amusing prom- 
ises. Let us instead call her 
"canny" by nature. Let us 
merely brand her a good 
business girl, who has gone 
about her Hollywood career 
from a business standpoint — a 
standpoint, by the way, which 
would ordinarily be termed 
madness, in a town where 
most rules are reversed. 



CERTAINLY Myrna her- 
self would be the last per- 
son in the world to point to her 
procedure as a pattern for suc- 
cess in the most baffling 
"game" in the world. Yet a glance back into her career might 
very well disclose a few hints which a girl of similar makeup 
might very well grasp to guide her in a Hollywood campaign. 
"I have always looked ahead — " 

Inadvertently Myrna Loy sounded the keynote of her career 
when she said this. 

"I am naturally serious," she further admitted. "I like 
fun, but I don't mix it with work. Work, to me, has always 
been a terribly serious matter, not to be trifled with." 

When she studied dancing as a girl, she studied it seriously, 

because she realized it must contribute something to her 

future. She learned it so well, that she started teaching, at 

one time presiding over a class of thirty 

6 1 h JJG K€ T [ PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 96 ] 




Elmer Fryer 



A L JOLSON is giving the cameraman a pretty mean 
-* *-look — interrupting him right in the middle of a 
masterpiece! Al said that "Wonder Bar" would be his 
last movie, positively. But after seeing the rushes, he 
changed his mind. Signed to make three more pictures 



71 



WHO'S in the DOG 




Lee Tracy is in a "pooch 
hut," and Harlow just got 
out of one. Jean wanted 
money ; Tracy was naughty 



YOU never saw such a dog 
house. 
It has hot and cold running 
swimming pools, plain and 
fancy bars with the latest thing in 
gadgets, the service is superb, the 
capacity unlimited. 

Also, it covers a lot of territory. 
One week, the dog house may be a 
palatial estate in Beverly Hills. The 
next it moves into a luxurious apart- 
ment in the heart of Hollywood. 

In fact, the expression is purely fig- 
urative. The dog house is wherever 
the in-bad actor happens to park with 
his pet peeve. 

The head pup in the dog house at 
the moment is Lee Tracy. 

It seems that Mexico was inimical 
to the idea of an American picture 
company making a movie called 

72 



Twice Mr. Beery served time in a 
canine kennel. But he came back 



"Viva Villa," with Villa's army 

dressed in rags. That started low, 
ominous rumblings of disapproval. 
Then, so the story has it, the whole 
company regarded the location trip 
as one grand lark, with that feeling 
of being in a "foreign country" stim- 
ulating them, and did some cutting- 
up. 

The climax was Tracy's balcony 
episode, during which he gave a per- 
formance that had Shakespeare's 
Juliet backed off the boards. 

Lee, having reduced the alcoholic 
content of the country a trifle more 
than two and a half per cent, was 
feeling high. And what more logical 
place for a lad feeling high, thought 
Lee, than a balcony? Swathing his 
manly form in a handy blanket, he 
strode out and entered into a con- 
versation with the Mexican army 
cadets, who happened to be marching 
by. The army objected, and Lee 
landed in the local bastille. 

As it turns out now, the country 
below the border regards it as a 



HOUSE NOW? 



By Ruth 
Ran kin 



Rent comes high. But 
some of our finest 
stars are numbered 
among the tenants ! 



minor escapade, merely a climax to other real or im- 
agined indignities suffered at the hands of the invading 
Americans. 

At any rate, Lee is in the dog house, with his con- 
tract cancelled, and his fevered brow cooled by the 
soothing hand of a grand girl named Isabel Jewell, in 
whose eyes Lee can do no wrong. Isabel is in the 
equivocal position of having just signed a contract 
with the same company that tore up Lee's. 

The entire personnel of "Viva Villa" has been re- 
cast, with the exception of Wallace Beery — and even 
the director, Howard Hawks, is no longer with the 
studio. 

So Lee has a lot of company in his particular dog 
house. 

The dog house has a ladies' entrance, too. 

Jean Harlow has recently occupied one of the love- 
liest in Brentwood — a Colonial 
model. Jean decided to strike for 
more salary, and according to 
the very latest reports, she got 
what she wanted. For several 
days she refused to show up in 
the wardrobe fitting-room to try 
on clothes to be worn in "Living 
in a Big Way." The result of the 
fuss is that Jean is now drawing 
double the salary she had been 
getting. 

Clara Bow kept the hinges hot 
for several years. Poor little Clara 
was the "fall-guy" in more than 
one escapade! The old headlines 
got her. And once a name looks 





Alice White's boy-friend trouble landed her in the 
dog house. How long will Alice have to stay there? 



Sylvia Sidney went in 
through the ladies' entrance 
when she walked off the 
lot. But she's out now 



well on the front page of a news- 
paper, it's hard to rub it out. 
Clara moved from one commodi- 
ous dog house to another, with the 
echoes following after. 

They are fading away on the 
breezes that sigh around the 
Rancho Clarita, over in Nevada. 
Clara's dog cottage has turned 
into a large, substantial ranch- 
house where she makes pancakes 
for Rex Bell's breakfast — which is 
one of the best sure-fire formulas 
yet devised for keeping out of 
headlines. Very few good pan- 
cake makers, who tend to their 
knitting, find time to get scandal- 
ously involved. 

When Clara moved out, the 
vacancy was promptly filled by 
Alice White. 

Alice broke her leash lately with a loud resounding bang, the 
detonations reverberating throughout the countryside. And 
with them, little Alice moved right into the dog house. 

Alice had boy-friend trouble. She phfft with Cy Bartlett. 
her "steady" for several years, and John Warburton was elected. 
The story goes that John behaved as no gentleman should — 
unless it's in the script — and smacked Alice in the best Jimmy 
Cagney tradition. 

This wound up in a debacle of accusations, retractions — and 
additions. The two hold-up men who said they were hired by 
Cy to get even with John, turned out to be wrong. Cy was re- 
added as Alice's heart-attack. John was subtracted. 

Over at Paramount, Jack Oakie is always on his way in — or 
out — of the dog house. He gets in because of a consistent failure 
to show up for work on schedule — [ PLEASE TURN TO page 122 ] 



Oakie is always "back- 
ing up" — right into the 
kennel, so far as his fel- 
low actors are concerned 



73 



And Here 



The intimate story of 
four personalities made 
famous through a novel 

By Virginia Maxwell 

OUT on the main road in the village 
of Concord, Massachusetts, there 
lives the last surviving member of 
the famous Alcott family generation; 
a woman who knew Louisa Alcott as "Aunt 
Louisa," who sewed and baked and pre- 
served jellies with "Meg" and who helped 
"Amy" to curl her hair and frame those 
precious sketches she was always penciling. 
This woman is Mrs. Frederick Alcott 
Pratt, widow of one of the twins in "Little 
Women." She lives in the proud old man- 
sion once occupied by the Alcott family. 
And although she is now seventy-four years 
old, her recollections of those other bygone 
days of the late "sixties," when the Alcott 
girls were her closest relatives, have not 
dimmed through the years. 

The ghosts of a thousand family mem- 
ories hovered over the little old-fashioned 
parlor where we sat. The same faded blue 
chintz draperies at the Colonial windows; 
brass oil lamps above the crumbling brick 
fireplace. On the same old mahogany settee 
with its deep plush cushions, where the little 
women once gathered to discuss those ever- 
vexing family problems, Mrs. Pratt sat 
back. She was going to relate some of 
her precious memories of the real 
"Jo" and "Meg" and "Beth" and 
"Amy," as she knew them. 

These girls were Louisa Al- 
cott's own sisters. But their 
real names were Anna 
(Meg), Elizabeth (Beth), 
and May (Amy). Louisa 
herself was Jo. 

"Anna was the eldest 
of the four girls, but it 
was to Louisa they always 
looked for encourage- 
ment," said Mrs. Pratt. 
"Louisa was never a 
hoyden; she typified the 
modern, spirited girl of 
this generation, except 
that she was in an old- 
fashioned setting. Vitally 
alive to the independence 
women were about to 
achieve; fearless, cour- 
ageous, the one member 
of the family who always 
saw better times ahead 
and eventually pulled 
them out of their strug- 
gle with poverty." 

"And did Louisa really 
yell 'Christopher Colum- 
bus' as Katharine Hepburn did in the picture 
nodded and smiled. 

"Yes, Louisa was always emphatic about 
as likely to say that as anything else. But 
how to bring home her point to her sisters. 




See the 




Louisa M, 
made her 



Alcott, the Jo of "Little Women," who 
family immortal with her famous story 



I asked. She 



things. She was 
she always knew 
Thev adored her 



Orchard House, of "Little Women" 
fame, as it looks today. Here the 
real Amy, Jo, Beth and Meg lived, 
and the famous book was written 



for it and looked up to her judg- 
ment in almost everything they 
did. 

"All those Alcott girls had a 
spirit of independence, you know. 
But there was a simplicity and a 
healthy flavor to their independ- 
ent spirits. No high-speed cars, 
none of the extreme luxury 
which girls today find so neces- 
sary. They loved books and 
music and outdoor life and the 
simple duties of their home." 

Mrs. Pratt's blue eyes wan- 
dered to the New England win- 
ter landscape just outside the 
old windows as she stopped 
speaking for a moment to hark 
back to a picture memory of 
long ago. 
"Why, I recall Louisa sitting in the crook of that lovely old 
tree just outside their Orchard house, reading a book, many 
a summer afternoon. She considered that having a fine time. 
And indeed it was. 

"I recall, too, little May scribbling pictures on the back of 



Real "Little Women" 




an old wooden egg-box. She 
loved to draw. Some of her best 
work was done on the doors of 
that house. 

"They lived in this old house 
and these are the pieces of furni- 
ture they used. They were 
handed down to me as each of 
the girls passed on." 

\Ye walked through the old- 
fashioned kitchen where "Meg" 
used to bake spiced cookies and 
one could almost feel the presence 
of these quiet-mannered Alcott girls 
going about their homey duties. An 
old iron coal range where the Alcott 
family dinners were baked and stained 
glass panels in the high, old oak dish 
closets. 

In the antiquated dining-room beyond, 
a curly maple table and chairs could be 
glimpsed — the same table, Mrs. Pratt explained, 
on which that Christmas morning breakfast of "Lit- 
tle Women" was once set out, the breakfast the girls so 
willingly shared with their impoverished neighbor. 

The simple charm of this old-fashioned atmosphere made 
one regret that the era had passed. Mrs. Pratt doesn't believe, 
however, girls will ever go back to that sort of simple living. 

"I don't believe they can," she commented. "Poor dears 
are caught in the whirlwind spirit of this generation. It's as 
inevitable as the march of progress. Maybe it's best they 
can't go back," she added, with a little twinkle in her eyes; 



"there were disadvantages for a girl to cope 
with in our generation, too. The stigma of 
being a spinster, for example. I believe they 
call them 'bachelor girls' today. 

" In my girlhood, it was considered a great 
humiliation never to have been honored by a 
man's proposal of marriage. A spinster 
became an object of pity among her friends. 
They tried to make up to her, in little kind- 
nesses*, the great loss of marriage. 

"Louisa never married, you recall. But it 
wasn't because she didn't have a proposal. 

"She almost married a nice Polish young 
man she met while abroad. He was really 
the 'Laurie' of her story. But Louisa lived 
with only one purpose in mind — to pull her 
family out of the poverty they knew during 
their childhood. 

WHEN 'Little Women' was published 
in 1868, it brought them the first bit 
of real money they were able to enjoy in 
many years, and it proved the turning point 
in their fortunes." 

What Mrs. Pratt then revealed about this 
famous book of American family life should 
be balm to the hopes of struggling writers 
today. She told me, quite frankly, that the 
publishers didn't care for the story when 
Louisa first brought it to them. 

They pronounced the first twelve chapters 
dull and Louisa struggled re-writing it during 
the entire summer of 1868 after which she 
took it to them again under the new title of 
"Little Women." Formerly she had titled it 
"The Pathetic Family." 

Roberts Brothers accepted it then. And 
Louisa always believed it was the psycho- 
logical effect of the new title rather than 
the re-written material that influ- 
enced the publishers. That title, 
" The Pathetic Family," brought 
up the subject of the Alcotts' 
poverty. Mrs. Pratt ex- 
plained it thus: "It was 
genteel poverty, the sort 
of thing their mother al- 
ways said was responsible 
for developing their fine 
characters. [please 

TURN TO PAGE 100] 




May Alcott (Amy) pre- 
ferred art to home duties, 
and played the grand lady 




Ilurrell 



PICTURE by picture, Madge Evans grows up. Now 
she's changed her ingenue curls for a simple hair 
arrangement that's very sophisticated. After "Fugitive 
Lovers," Madge is going to get her first big chance with 
higher dramatics, as the lead in "Forgotten Girl" 



76 



The Lady 



Who 

lushed 



Hollywood 



Cynical, too, about 
romance is this 
new cinema blaze 

By Wilbur Morse, Jr. 



THIS is the story of a 
little Southern rebel 
who let romance side- 
track, her from success 
and then, when her dreams 
burst like soap bubbles, be- 
came a cynic at twenty-two, 
a screen sensation at the same 



age. 

The lady who had lost love, 
they all her now in the little 
group who knew her best in 
those very recent yesterdays 
when she climbed into the 
fickle lap of fame on Broad- 
way. 

And it is from this group's 
album of memories that the 
following snapshots of Mar- 
garet Sullavan, Hollywood's 
newest heiress to hurrahs, 
were gathered. 

Turn the page, Priscilla, 
let's look at the pictures — ■ 
pictures that really never were 
taken, but which we can, 
nevertheless, visualize. 

Cute, those baby pictures, 
aren't they? But all baby 
pictures are cunning and Cor- 
nelius Hancock Sullavan and 
his wife, the former Garland 

Council!, knew that many other infants in Norfolk, V 
had just as winning ways as their daughter. 

There's one taken the day America entered the war. 
children at the Walter Taylor Grammar School were giv 
flags that day. Peggy brought hers home and Uncle 




lrginia, 

All the 
en tiny 
Charlie 



thought it would be sweet to photograph her 
waving it. 

And now, to continue our imaginary album, 
that's the graduating class at the Chatham 
Episcopal Institute. The girl in the center, 
the one with brown curls and gray eyes, is 
Peggy. 

She was still at Sullins College in Bristol, 
Virginia, when the next one was taken. That 
was the year she won her argument with her 
father and mother and persuaded them to let 
her enroll at the Copley Theatrical School up 
in Boston. 

E. E. Clive, the actor-manager who is now 
running the Hollywood Playhouse, was direct- 
ing there. Here is what he said about her: 

"She had an instinctive grace, a voice that 
promised depths yet to be explored, and an 
earnestness rather surprising to find in a little 
Southern girl whom the Harvard boys were 
only too eager to make a belle of their balls." 
As a matter of fact, it was one of her Harvard admirers who 
gave Peggy Sullavan her first opportunity on the stage. 

Charles Leatherbee, scion of the wealthy Crane family, was 
then gathering a group of college boys and girls to take to Fal- 
mouth, a Cape Cod resort, where [ please turn" to page 104 ] 

77 











I HAPPENED to be a fellow-passenger on 
board the Colombian liner, '"Haiti," with the 
plucky little band when it set out on location 
in the black republic of Haiti. They were the 
life of our ship's party, playing games, dancing and 
laughing all the way down to the Spanish Main. 

Sooner or later, every passenger going to Haiti 
and Jamaica begins to talk about voodoo. "Rub- 
bish and nonsense!'' we all agreed. 

"Oh, is it?" asked a middle-aged man who had 
been a Colonial officer in the British West Indies. 
Most of the time he sat drinking in a dark corner 
of the bar. Alone, no doubt because of the hideous 
scar where one side of his face had been slashed. 
" I could tell you a bit about what you call voodoo, 
if I chose." But he did not choose. 

And the movie people went right along, light- 

78 




Drums 

in the 

Jungle 



A strange story — all 
truth — of picture-mak- 
ing and voodooism in 
the West Indian Islands 



By Henry A. Phillips 



heartedly informing us how they intended, in a few 
brief weeks, to penetrate the dread secrets of voodoo 
and to strip black magic bare of its superstitions in 
this picture they were going to make, "Drums of 
the Night." 

That was before things began to "happen" — 
weird, fearful things unbelievable in a white man's 
world of substantial architecture and hard facts. 
That was before they were scarred by weeks of 
wallowing in West Indian jungles through unending 
nights, stung and maddened by monster insects, 
haunted by strange cries, ever surrounded by hun- 
dreds of black faces and roll- 
ing eyes, their souls harassed 
by mystic phenomena of the 
ghosts and black magic they 
had come to explode. 

We had a happy landing at 
Port au Prince and all rode in 
a party to the cozy little 
Hotel Sans Souci up the 
hill. We threaded our way 
through a continuous pro- 
cession of black people pad- 
ding along barefoot, jabber- 
ing in French, carrying broad 
baskets of exotic fruits on 
their heads. Three million 
pure African black popula- 
tion with a bare handful of 
whites among them ; a friendly 
people until crossed in their 
superstitions! 

"I think you're going to 
have trouble," Ralph Barnes, 
the proprietor of the Sans 
Souci, told them that night 
as they sat talking over their 
planters' punch. 

They laughed and went off 
to bed. Next morning, the 
preliminaries of "Drums of 
the Night" began with a 
search for types and dancers. 



Nightfall found George Terwiliger, the director, 
and Carl Burger, the cameraman, far back in 
the hills with a native guide, in search of a 
voodoo dance. The dark was not far advanced 
before they heard the first drums. They left the 
car and walked in the direction of the sound. 

They were admitted into the circle of dancers, 
but the moment it was learned that they wanted 
to hire the drummers, the dancers and maybe 
the papaloi (a witch doctor) for money, a sin- 
ister note crept in. It seemed advisable to leave. 
On the seat of the car they found a curious chap- 
let of crossed twigs. It was an oitanga. Already 
they were under a "curse." The tire had been 
punctured with a poisonous thorn, and down 
the road they found a royal palm tree felled 
across their path. 

UNDAUNTED, they spent the following 
three days trying to engage native drummers 
and supers in the town, and managed finally to 
gather a rag-tag company together. The sev- 
eral truck-loads of equipment were made ready 
to set out on location in the morning. At break- 
fast next day they were served with a notice to 
pack up and get out of the country on the first 
out-going steamer! 

Within twenty-four hours it was quite evi- 
dent that they were taboo in Haiti — "untouch- 
ables." There were a score of little "accidents" 
that happened to members of the company, that 
no one could account for or actually put his 
finger on. That night Terwiliger rushed agi- 
tatedly up to Barnes. "We're getting out to- 
morrow on the 'Colombia,' thank God! I'm 
taking the Haitian drummers and the dancers 
with us — I've got to have them." 

But morning found the drummers in the 
Government jail. The dancers had vanished 
completely! The company left Haiti at noon for 
Kingston, no farther advanced than when they 
had arrived a week before. And a strange fore- 
boding replaced the high spirits of their happy 
landing. 

Now Haiti is not that sort of a place at all for 
ordinary, pleasure-seeking tourists such as you 
and I. In fact, it is a little undiscovered para- 
dise with all the charm of the tropics among a 
friendly hospitable people. 



%• 



* ♦ 



»> 




I v 



In the movie, Fredi Wash- 
ington, as a native sorceress, 
exercises a power over the 
natives, compelling them to 
help her kill the white woman 



I parted company with my 
movie friends at Kingston. 



A E 



A native drummer, under 
a voodoo spell, pounds the 
drum in the jungle 
throughout the night 



kt 



On the white hero's servants, the superstitious 
natives place a curse, or ouanga, to frighten them 
into sacrificing the white heroine to voodooism 



BOUT a month later, I re- 
turned to Kingston. I did 
not get 'round to the Myrtlebank 
where the company was stop- 
ping until that night. The mov- 
ing picture people had disap- 
peared. From the manager and 
others I picked up details of 
their activities. They had tried 
to work beneath the frizzling 
tropical sun, and found the heat 
too extreme. So they had con- 
ceived the audacious idea of 
working entirely at night. They 
were now completing a picture 
made, from beginning to end, 
after dark. This was possible 
because of the monster new-type 
floodlights which they had 
brought with them, and generat- 
ing plants which they had man- 
aged to transport into the heart of a jungle recently devastated 
and flooded by hurricanes and cloudbursts — an American feat 
too prodigious for the Jamaicans to understand. They gasped 
over the whole undertaking, "and amidst such ominous condi- 
tions! " they hinted with lowered voices that set me to wonder- 
ing. The company set out for the jungle at eight o'clock each 
evening and returned about seven in the morning. A special 
car carrying hot coffee and sandwiches was dispatched to them 
at midnight. I was in that food car when it set out, accom- 
panied by two half-frightened black boys. 

It was a reeking hot night and all the blacks of Kingston 
seemed to be loitering along the open road. Out past Gallows 
Point, still held in awe by the Negroes because there the last 
buccaneers hung on the island walk-about with their gibbets 
under their arms, a dark velvety calm hung ominously over the 
Caribbean. The lights of distant Kingston trembled ghostily 
in the sea's depths. On past Spanish Town, colonial houses 

79 






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tions. A slice of blinding West 
Indian daylight caught in the 
meshes of a dense jungle. A bril- 
liant patch of noonday brightness 
set in the darkest fold of the black 
robe of night! Subconsciously 
I knew what it was, of course. 
Before me was a huge generator 
truck whirring and snorting like a 
maddened beast caught in a jun- 
gle trap. How they ever got it 
there through the mire and wreck- 
age of jungle trees, the Lord only 
knows! I had reached the sharp 
edge of the circle of light that 
seemed to cut through actuality 
like a knifeblade. 

STANDING at the far end of 
that cleared space of unearthly 
light was a huge figure of painted 
wood with fiery eyes, a writhing 
snake coiled 'round its neck and 
striking venomously. On either 
side stood an ugly half -naked black 
man, upholding a flaring torch. 
Directly in front of it, a tall cada- 
verous papaloi was bending to re- 
ceive a blessing. The drums kept 
dinning in my ears, but I felt that I 
now understood a rhythm and rune 
that flowed from the black heart 
of the monster, through the ritual 
of the witch doctor, and into the 
souls of the dusky figures that en- 
circled the space. Their gaze was 
fixed, their eyes rolling. From 
time to time they raised their 
hands above their heads. Africa 
had closed in on them and they 

[ PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 98 ] 



0H 



I 



Above, the young sorceress is cornered in the voodoo tree, 
and shortly thereafter, meets her end. Right, what a real 
voodoo dancer does during the daytime. A charmer at 
night, she is doing the family wash on the river's bank 



gradually turned into huts, and in each hut a dusky group 
hovered over a smoking oil torch, like dark witches gazing 
into blazing cauldrons. Little by little the people and the 
landscape merged into Africa. Gradually this alien night gave 
color and terror to my inflamed imagination. The exotic trees 
silhouetted in grim shadows; the pungent odors; the sounds of 
the jungle — -night birds sobbing, owls hooting in a minor key, 
human cries and wails, and singing in primitive, jazz-like 
rhythms. 

Then my ear caught it — the throb of drums, of tom-toms. 
My two darkies had sensed it and a strange, yearning fear took 
possession of them. They drove like mad to our mutual peril. 
Suddenly, we turned off the road into a dense banana planta- 
tion, and in another five minutes were sunk up to our hubs in 
mud. Walking was the only alternative, along a pathway paved 
with banana and palm leaves. In the darkness I kept slipping 
off into the mud. Then I lost the boys and went astray in the 
endless banana forest, beyond which was the jungle. 

The terrifying sound of those drums was ever beating in my 
ears, and my heart tried in vain not to keep time with their 
maddening unearthly rhythm as I plunged along in the mud. 

Then I caught sight of the most eerie spectacle I have ever 
seen in my life. And I feared that my imagination had been 
driven by those reverberating drums into a web of hallucina- 




SO 



PHOTOPLAY'S 



Hollywood Beauty Shop 



Conducted 
By Carolyn 
Van W y c k 



All the beauty 
tricks of all the 
stars brought to 
you each month 




THERE are three impor- 
tant points to remember 
in perfect powdering," says 
June Vlasek. "Powder 
to the hairline. Very 
necessary with off-the-face 
hats and coiffures that ex- 
pose the forehead and ears" 



DON'T neglect mouth 
corners," warns June. 
Press powder on right to 
lipline. Generous powder- 
ing enlarges and accents a 
feature,- light powdering de- 
tracts attention. Remember 
when powdering your nose 



FOR soft, youthful effect, powder 
must be artfully applied about 
eyes. Do this afteryour lash make- 
up. Press on powder to soften 
laughter lines, then dust with 
brush or puff. Powder beneath 
eyesdisguisesdarkshadows. June 
Vlasek is using a new powder 
beautifully boxed in shiny black 
and peach with square puff 






81 



Our "Alice in Wonderland" 




pAROLE LOMBARD 
' — creates an exquisite, 
cameo contour by re- 
versing the accepted 
mode of her comb. The 
tortoise shell band is 
placed at the nape of 
her neck, just above her 
ears, to hold curls close 
to her neckline. Chic! 



FOR evening, Judith 
Allen prefers a coil of 
brilliants, in the "Alice 
in Wonderland" man- 
ner. Very sweet and in- 
genue. Notice how 
charmingly the diadems 
adorn both the suave, 
smoothly coiffured head 
as well as the informal 



EVELYN VENABLE'S 
«— tiara is very regal and very 
decorative with its tiny 
globes of brilliants. Evelyn 
wears her long hair parted 
and coiled low on her neck, 
the bandeau lending just the 
festive touch for evening 



H 



as Inspire 



d Th 



ese 



Diad 



ems 





JUDITH ALLEN is using a 

vnew waterless shampoo. 
The solution is applied to the 
scalp, combed through the 
hair, allowed to dry and is 
then brushed out. Leaves 
your hair beautifully clean 
and does not injureyour wave 



I ONA ANDRE looks 

I — very cunning and 
schoolgirl ish with her 
"Alice in Wonderland" 
ribbon slipped under 
her waves so that only 
the top shows. The 
young find this ribbon 
arrangement lovely 
f o r even i n g or day 



A COMBofbrilliants 
/\a nd onyx coils 
crowns Dorothea 
Wieck's dark locks with 
royal charm. These 
newest hairdecorations 
are versatile adornments 
because you may wear 
them with almost any 
type of coiffure orgown 

83 



Ideas 

From the 

Screens 

You nger 

Set 




THIS is Betty Furness' favorite talcum, featuring a new 
container and leak-proof top. Aside from genera 
uses, a little on the palms makes gloves go on like magic 




EVEN if she is very young," 
says Betty Furness, "every girl 
should use an eye or tissue cream 
over her lids and beneath her 
eyes at night." Sun, exposure, 
eye strain, tension, begin early to 
etch fine lines, and the use of 
cream is your only safeguard 



ONA ANDRE is all agog over 
I— her new fire engine red nail 
lacquer and remover in a cunning 
redorwhite leatherholder, which 
later makes a perfect cigarette case. 
Fire engine red is suggested for 
warm toned skin and is smart with 
many of the newest colors 

( For Mote Beauty Tips Turn to Page 87 ) 



■ Mrs. Thomas M. Carnegie, Jr. desert 
New York to spend her winters on 
Cumberland Island off the coast of Georgia. 
In the summer she is at Newport in her 
lovely house. She loves animals and her 
favorite fox terrier, Bozo, goes every- 
where with her. She is a deft and delight- 
ful hostess and her shrimp Newburgh, 
southern style, is excelled only by her 
Georgian wild turkey with wild rice. 
She always smokes Camel cigarettes. 



"I NEVER TIRE OF 

THEIR FLAVOR" 

"They always taste so good. They 
are smooth and rich and certainly 
prove that a cigi rette can be mild 
without being flat or sweetish," 
says Mrs. Carnegie. "Camels 
never make my nerves jumpy or 
ragged, either. And they're so 
popular that keeping enough in 
the house over week-ends is a 
problem." 

That is because steady smokers 
turn to Camels knowing that they 
never get on the nerves. People 
do appreciate this. You will like 
the smooth flavor of the costlier 
tobaccos in Camels. For a cool 
and mild cigarette that you enjoy 
no matter how many you smoke, 
try Camels. 

CAMELS ARE MADE FROM FINER, MORE 

EXPENSIVE TOBACCOS THAN ANY 

OTHER POPULAR BRAND 



Copyright, 1934, 

R. J. Reynolds 

Tobacco Company 




What must a young girl know 

BEFORE MARRIAGE? 



A Budapest bookseller, faced with hard times, advertised that 
he had for sale a volume of information indispensable to a 
young girl contemplating matrimony. He said that in this 
book would be found — not what every young girl is told before 
marriage — but what she will find it indispensable to know. 

Thousands sent their mail-orders. Then — complaints 
began to pour in. Finally an outraged man brought the book- 
seller into court. He stated that he had sent for one of these 
compendia of indispensable information . . . and that he had 
received by mail a 19th Century Cook-book — "Lazy Little 
Lulu Learns Cookery." He wanted the bookseller found guilty 
of obtaining money under false pretenses. . . . 

But the judge acquitted him, saying that he was in thor- 
ough accord with the bookseller's view that a knowledge of 
cooking was of primary importance to the prospective bride. 

Your favorite magazine could be advertised truthfully in 
very much the same way. The most indispensable knowledge 
to a young wife is knowing where and what to buy . . . how to 
get the most for her money . . . how — on a limited budget — 
to keep her home fresh, new, attractive . . . how to dress her- 
self and her children, inexpensively yet in the very latest styles 
. . . how to serve on her table foods of dependable quality. 

In other words — the advertising that appears in this maga- 
zine contains information of real value . . . NEWS! Announce- 
ments of the latest and best in the shopping world. This is 
indispensable information to every woman, especially to 
those with families. It helps them run their homes happily. 
Surely that is what every woman must know. 




BETTE DAVIS, soon to ap ; 
pear in " Fash ions of 1934," 
has found a new perfume that 
suits her moods and that has 
the fashion world agog at the 
moment. Suit your moods, 
too, when choosing perfume 



AWHILE ago, a visitor to Hollywood 
might have been struck by the fact that 
the stars did not seem to use face rouge. 
On my first visit, too, that was my impression. 
"Well," I thought, "most of them have on 
heavy screen make-up all day and it is prob- 
ably a relief to have a natural face when not 
working." 

Now it seems that Hollywood is using much 
more face rouge, or, at least, is appearing with a 
glow of fresh color on its cheeks. And a good 
thing, I think. 

I remember that Loretta Young told me she 
was glad when screen make-up developed to 
the point where an actress might use rouge be- 
fore the camera. Formerly, this might have 
caused a shadow or hollow on the cheeks. 
Loretta explained that this touch of color 
encouraged and inspired her, kept her from 
"feeling pale." 

While "feeling pale" is nothing but a mood, 
I think it is a dangerous one. It lets you down, 
makes you feel about half of what you really 
are. I do not think it should be encouraged to- 
day. A touch of color to the cheeks seems to 
eliminate this mood entirely. 

But that touch is the all-important thin',;. 
In all phases of make-up, there is hardly one 
that requires more expert application than 
cheek rouge. Except in very few cases, a little 
is all that is needed. And this little should be 
applied so that only a very gentle color seems 
to arise from beneath the skin. Where you 
place this color, depends entirely upon the 
contour of your face. As a rule, rouge always 
belongs fairly high on the face. Lona Andre 
applies it beneath the eyes on the full part of 



IIARMONIZING lipstick 

land nail-lacquer is one of 
the newest Hollywood 
vogues, as sponsored by 
Muriel Evans. These smart 
touches give you chic and 
add a glow of well-being 



Make-Up 

Tr e n d s 

from 

Hollywood 

By Carolyn Van Wyck 



the cheek, blending outward to the temples. 
Charming on young, soft faces. 

The long, thin face may be made to appear 
fuller by applying rouge slightly away from the 
nose, fairly high and blending outward in fan 
shape toward the ears. The round face may be 
slenderized by the application of rouge at the 
center of the cheekbone and high, blending out- 
ward also in fan shape. By keeping rouge 
higher on the face, the impression of length is 
created. The squarish face should apply rouge 
a little closer to the nose and let it fade out- 
ward on the cheeks, not carrying it to the 
temples. The oval face, like the long, should 
start at the middle of the cheek and blend the 
rouge upward and outward. While these gen- 
eral principles apply, I think everyone shoul l 
experiment personally to decide just where the 
rouge is most becoming. 

If your eyes are darkly shadowed beneath, as 
some naturally are, your rouge carried fairly 
high and powder carried to the lashline will 
soften these shadows and make them less 
noticeable. 

A paste or cream rouge is suggested for your 
first application because this type gives a very 
natural effect and is very lasting. Every girl, 
however, needs a compact rouge to touch up 
the effect now and then. 

Hollywood's style of rouging the lips is to 
make them pleasantly full — but not overdone. 
Do you remember the comments that Joan 
Crawford's lips caused in "Rain"? That was 
character make-up, of course. However, 
moderate fullness is infinitely preferable to the 
very thin lip. To avoid the latter, concentrate 
color at the center, rouging well to the edges. 
If your lips are extremely full, rouge them 
lightly. Terc Westmore, Hollywood studio 
authority on make-up, advises us all to avoid 
v. hat he calls the "depression" mouth — the 
mouth that droops at the corners. You can 
correct this by a slight upward flourish of your 
stick at the outer corners of the upper lip. This 
will give you a happy mouth. 

Above, Muriel Evans illustrates the latest 
lipstick-nail lacquer tip from Hollywood, and a 
grand one if you want flattering comments. 
Even a pale polish can match in tone. 



NEWEST MAKE-UP AIDS" is our latest leaflet. It will introduce 
you to some new lipsticks, rouges, powders and other accents, 
and tell you how to apply them. Or if you are more concerned with 
hair, nails, perfumes, or skin, we have special material. Enclose 
separate stamped, self-addressed envelope for each leaflet to Carolyn 
Van Wyck, Photoplay Magazine, 221 West 57th Street, NewyorkCity. 



87 



88 



Photoplay Magazine for February, 1934 



46 



can help you win 




~Wf —mam ~J^V • '-^Ktf ■ i ~TB 

and hold them 



ff 



Precious Elements 
in this Soap — 
Scientists Explain 

"Skin grows old-looking through the 
gradual loss of certain elements 
Nature puts in skin to keep it youth- 
ful," scientists say. "Gentle Lux Toilet 
Soap, so readily soluble, actually 
contains such precious elements — 
checks their loss from the skin." 



Photoplay Magazine for February, 1934 



89 



liearts 



says 



Barbara Stanwyck 




^OVEty 



tVAi ^«^RoI 



This fascinating screen star 
tells you her secret of loveliness 
. . . how to have a skin 
that wins instant adoration. 

You see her here as she looks in her own 
boudoir in Hollywood. Notice how tempt- 
ingly soft and smooth her skin is. Surely 
you'll want to follow her advice — make 
yours as lovely! 

All over the country girls are turning to 
the complexion care Barbara Stanwyck 
uses — proving that it really does bring a 
thrilling new beauty to the skin. 

Actually 9 out of 10 screen stars use 
this same wonderful aid to loveliness — 
fragrant, white Lux Toilet Soap. Why 
don't you try this famous Hollywood com- 
plexion care? Get Lux Toilet Soap today 
. . . use it regularly. Notice how soft and 
smooth your skin looks . . . and feels . . . 
even from the first. 
Begin now to win new 
loveliness. 



Men can't resist alluring skin 
—you can have this <pltarm 




Ask Th 




e / vnswer 



M 



an 




Cora Sue Collins, chosen by Garbo to portray her as a child in "Queen Christina." Since she got 
the part, Cora Sue has autographed over two hundred photographs of herself for admiring friends 






ABY GARBO"— that's what they are 
kcalling Cora Sue Collins. Since M-G-M 
announced that Cora Sue was to play 
Garbo as a child in "Queen Christina," this 
old Dean of Wisdom has been swamped with 
letters asking about the petite curly-head. 

Cora Sue, just six years old, is as enthusiastic 
about her career in pictures, and has as much 
ambition as any of our reigning stars. She 
says she wants to be a "champeen actress," 
and means it, too. 

She was born in Beckley, W. Va., although 
Clarksburg and Huntington both claim her. 
She lived in both places during her babyhood. 
At the age of three she won a contest for the 
title of "Champion Baby of Clarksburg." 
That's where her "champeen" idea originated. 
When she was four her mother took her to 
Hollywood to try to get her into pictures. 
Their meager funds ran low and Mrs. Collins 
had to sell hosiery from door to door. Then 
one day she took Cora Sue to Universal City 
where they were casting the ZaSu Pitts-Slim 
Summerville picture "The Unexpected Father." 
There were lots of little children there, most 
of them beautiful and daintily dressed. Cora 
Sue's face, dirty from the long trolley ride out 
to the studio, seemed to stand out. She was 
given a screen test, and the picture was hers. 

From Universal she went to Paramount to 
play in "The Strange Case of Clara Deane." 
Then M-G-M gave her the prized role of Norma 
Shearer as a baby in "SmiLin' Through." This 
was followed by parts in "Jennie Gerhardt," 
with Sylvia Sidney, and "Torch Singer," with 
Claudette Colbert. 

Cora Sue was one of two hundred little girls 
who were tested for the coveted role of portray- 
ing the child queen in "Queen Christina." She 
was personally chosen by Garbo because she so 
closely resembled the Swedish star in her 
childhood. 

90 



Read This Before As\ing Questions 

Avoid questions that call for unduly long an- 
swers, such as synopses of plays Do not inquire 
concerning religion, scenario writing, or studio em- 
ployment. \\ rite on only one siae of the paper. 
Sign your full name and address. For a personal 
reply, enclose a stamped, self-addressed envelope. 



Casts and Addresses 

As these take up much space, we treat such sub- 
jects in a different way from other questions. For 
this kind of information, a stamped, self-addressed 
envelope must always be sent. Address all inquiries 
to Questions and Answers, Photoplay Magazine, 
221 W. S7th St., New York City. 



If her part in a picture calls for crying, Cora 
Sue just has to think of something sad and big 
tears come right out of those pretty brown 
eyes. At home she never cries at all. She 
likes to dry dishes and make ice-box cookies. 
She can sing, too, and play the piano with two 
hands. After having been chosen by Garbo to 
play in "Queen Christina," she received over 
two hundred requests for her photograph. She 
autographed them herself. She has one pet, a 
cute kitten whose name is "Cuddles." 

Virginia Geis, Chicago, III. — Sally Rand, 
the fan dancer, was in pictures way back in 
1925. She appeared in Sennett, Roach and 
Christie comedies before graduating to feature 
length pictures. Was a Wampas Baby Star in 
1927 and left the screen in 1928 for the stage. 
Sally's real name is Hazel Beck. She was born 
in Winchester, Ky., April 3, 1905. She is 5 
feet, % inches tall; weighs 115 pounds, has ash 
blonde hair and gray eyes. You will be seeing 
her on the screen again soon in "Bolero" and 
other productions. Lois Wilson and Marion 



Da vies are each 5 feet, 5} 2 inches tall. Lois 
weighs 120, Marion three pounds more. Anna 
Sten is 5 feet, 3 inches tall and weighs 110 
pounds. Dorothea Wieck is two inches taller 
than Anna and weighs eight pounds more. 

Joe Tripi, Worcester, Mass. — I'm a base- 
ball fan too, Joe. William Haines played the 
role of Jim Kelly in "Slide, Kelly, Slide." 
Sally O'Neil appeared with him. 

B. A. Lee, Fiji Islands. — Thanks for that 
perfectly grand snapshot you sent me. How 
do those boys like our movies down your way? 
Dorothy Mackaill is still in pictures. Her 
latest is "The Chief," in which she appears 
with Ed Wynn. 

Richard Kantsky, Indianapolis, Ind. — 
Esther Ralston is now under contract to M- 
G-M, so you will be seeing her more frequently. 
She recently made "By Candlelight" for Uni- 
versal. 

R. Schonberger, New York City. — Beau- 
tiful Billie Dove was born in New York City 
on May 14, 1903. She is 5 feet, 5 inches tall; 
weighs 114 and has dark brown hair and brown 
eyes. Was married to Robert Kenaston last 
May. She is not working in pictures just now. 

Alma, Buenos Aires, S. A. — You certainly 
admire Paul Muni, if you really mean all you 
write about him. You will see him next in 
"Hi, Nellie," a newspaper story. 

Ruth Selfrtdge, Term: Haute, Ind.— 
Diana Wynyard was born in London, England, 
January 16, 1908. She is 5 feet, 6J^ inches 
tall; weighs 127 pounds and has golden brown 
hair and dark blue eyes. Her latest picture 
was "Reunion In Vienna." 



Photoplay Magazine for February, 1934 



9 1 



Alice Carley, Chicago, III. — Alan Dine- 
hart had a long and successful stage career 
before he started making pictures. He is a 
native of Missoula, Mont., born there in 1889. 
He is married to Mozelle Brittonne. 

J. R., Sax Francisco, Calif. — Frank Law- 
ton played the role of the younger son in 
"Cavalcade." Margaret Lindsay was the girl 
the older boy married. The four children who 
appeared in the early part of the picture were, 
Dick Henderson, Jr., Douglas Scott, Sheila 
MacGill and Bonita Granville. Margaret 
Harris was played by Irene Browne. 

Alice Serin, Adrian, Mich. — Robert 
Young is 26 years old. His latest pictures are 
"Hell Below," "Today We Live," "Tugboat 
Annie," "Saturday's Millions," and "Caro- 
lina." 

Anita Crawtord, Adrian, Mich. — So you 
and Alice like the same boy, eh? Bob Young 
was the lad who played the role of Ricardo in 
"The Kid From Spain." You just didn't 
recognize him with the little mustache. Ed- 
mund Lowe's latest picture is "Her Body- 
guard." Joan Blondell was 24 years old on 
August 30; Lew Ayres the same in December. 

A. G., Alexandria, La. — Colin Give was 
born in St. Malo, France, about 33 years ago. 
He entered pictures in 1929. Elizabeth Allan, 
newcomer to the American screen, was born 
in Skegness, Lincolnshire, Eng., in April, 1910. 
She started making pictures in Europ : in 1930. 
Early last year Metro brought her to Holly- 
wood. In private life she is Mrs. William J. 
O'Bryen. 

Hersch, Lake Placid, N. Y. — Johnny 
Weissmuller's new picture is "Tarzan and 
His Mate." Joan Bennett, Elissa Landi, 
Marlene Dietrich and Kay Francis are each 
5 feet, 5 inches tall. They weigh 108, 119, 120 
and 112 respectively. Joan Crawford is one 
inch shorter than these girls and weighs 115. 

Shirley, Swampscott, Mass. — Lots of 
other girls are crazy about Onslow Stevens. 
too. He is a Los Angeles lad, born there on 
March 29, 1906. He is 6 feet, 2 inches tall; 
weighs 175 and has brown hair and brown eyes. 
He was on the stage before going into pictures. 







Best news in years 

for lovely fingertips . . . 
GLAZO now only 25c! 




The new Glazo is getting hearty cheers 
from girls who formerly paid lots more 
than a quarter for nail polish. But they're 
much less excited about the money they 
save than about Glazo's superior virtues. 

Glazo's new lacquers are richer in lus- 
tre ... so fingertips are lovelier, more 
gloriously beautiful, than ever before. 
What's more, actual tests show Glazo 
wears 50% longer. 

And colors? Glazo's six authentic shades 
are approved by leading beauty and fash- 
ion authorities . . . and the exclusive 
Color Chart Package shows just how 



Another good Broadwayite, gone Hol- 
lywood. Hal Le Roy, dancer, has been 
signed by Warners to star in the 
talkie-version of "Harold Teen" 




they'll look on your nails — solves the 
whole problem of selecting the exact 
shades you want. 

Glazo's new metal shaft brush, with 
its soft, uniform bristles, assures perfect 
application on every nail. And the brush 
just can't come loose. 

Ever run out of Polish Remover at the 
most exasperating moment? Glazo Re- 
mover now comes in an extra-size bottle . . . 
enough to last as long as your polish. 

If you've been paying two or three 
times as much, you'll just appreciate 
the new Glazo all the more. 

GLAZO LIQUID POLISH. Six authentic shades. 
Natural, Shell, Flame, Geranium, Crimson, Man- 
darin Red, Colorless. 25c each. In Canada, 30c. 

GLAZO POLISH REMOVER. A true cosmetic, 

gentle to nail and skin. Removes even deepest polish 
completely. Extra-size bottle, 25c. In Canada, 30c. 

GLAZO CUTICLE REMOVER. A new liquid cu'.ide 
remover. Extra-size bottle, 25c. In Canada, 5 c. 

GLAZO TWIN KIT. Contains both Liquid Polish 
and extra-size Polish Remover. In Natural, Shell, 
Flame, 40c. In Canada, 50c. 



THE GLAZO COMPANY, Inc., Dept. GQ-24 

191 Hudson Street, New York, N. Y. 

(In Canada, address P. O. Box 2320, Montreal) 

I enclose 10c for sample kit containing Glazo Liquid 
Polish, Polish Remover, and Liquid CuticleRemover. 
(Check the shade of Polish preferred) . . . 
□ Natural C Shell □ Flame D Geranium 



John, the Great 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 45 



When I inquired whether he hoped to bring 
"Hamlet" to the screen, he thoughtfully re- 
plied: 

"I not only hope but fully expect to do so. 
I believe the time is approaching when it will 
be done in a talking picture. One reason for 
this conviction is that I have the greatest 
respect for the intelligence of the movie audi- 
ence, another that I feel certain film producers 
will shortly realize that ' Hamlet' is not merely 
a Shakespearean play but a vital melodrama 
that will make them a lot of money." 

Throwing down his napkin as though it were 
a gauntlet, he took up the question of Shake- 
speare and the masses. 

"TT may be that movie producers don't, as 
■*-yet, fully realize what a good, fast-moving 
melodrama 'Hamlet' really is, but they will," 
he declared. "Just as one man in New York 
did when we were giving the play there. A 
Tammany politician called up Sam Harris, at 
whose theater the production was running, and 
was sorry to say: 

" 'I don't know how she got that way, but 
my wife's crazy to see that play you've got at 
your place — " Hamlet," ain't it? — an' nothin'll 
do but what I go with her tonight. If you've 
got 'em, I wish you'd save me a coupla seats on 
the aisle so I can make a quiet sneak as soon as 
the house is dark and beat it over to Dinty 
Moore's.' " 

"That night Dinty lost, and Shakespeare 
won a customer. The Tammany gentleman 
left his seat only long enough to tear out be- 
tween acts and tell Harris the play was 'the 
works.' 

" 'Say, Sam,' he wanted to know, 'you don't 
mean to tell me that Shakespeare wrote it? 
Why, it's swell! Even Owen Davis never 
turned out anything better. Gee, that tough 
mug with the big beard — yeah, the guy that 
married the kid's mother after bumping off his 
old man — is sure gettin' away with murder. 
He's puttin' it all over the poor little fella. 
But the kid's there with the wallop, an' I hope 
he gets even with that dirty double-crosser.' 

" 'Shakespeare sees to that,' Sam assured 
him. 

" 'Good!' cried the Tammany man. 'I'm 
goin' right back for the knockout!' " 

Mr. Barrymore squared the shoulders he got 
from his father, Maurice Barrymore, amateur 
champion middleweight of England in his day, 
and added this punch: 

"Then remember what happened when the 
late E. H. Sothern and Julia Marlowe went 
down to Fourteenth Street in New York for the 
first time and played Shakespeare for months 
at the vast Academy of Music to gigantic audi- 
ences. Their experiment proved what I'm 
getting at. 

"They discovered it was the masses that 
supported Shakespeare, particularly 'Hamlet.' 
They found, too, it was the poorer people who 
largely made up their audiences. 

"The same thing was true when they made a 
tour of the country, also at popular prices. It 
is only reasonable to believe there would be the 
same response from movie audiences at even 
lower prices." 

"pAITH glowed in the imperishable Barrymore 
■*■ profile, made to order for the Prince of Den- 
mark. Back of it burned the determination to 
give talking pictures the greatest play ever 
written, with its greatest character played by 
not only the greatest actor on the screen, in my 
none too humble opinion, but the greatest 
actor in the English-speaking world. Should 
you, by any chance, be inclined to differ with 
this high estimate, you may consider yourself 
duly challenged to name another who can 
match John Barrymore, comedian and tragedi- 

92 



an alike, in skill, intelligence, variety and 
brilliance 

Often I had wondered why he left the 
theater, and now I asked him. 

"What caused you to give up the stage?" 

"A swordfish," was his solemn reply. 

"A swordfish?" 

"A swordfish. Once, when I was new to 
Hollywood and swordfish were brand-new to 
me, I caught one in the waters off Catalina, to 
my great surprise, intense delight and extreme 
embarrassment. The swordfish evidently felt 
the same way about it, except for the delight. 
He — I speak advisedly — was reserved, rather 
than cordial. Obviously, he was not glad to 
meet me. Indeed, there was about him a cer- 
tain aloofness, a seeming reluctance, even to 
meet me halfway. In fact, he was disposed to 
cut me dead. For my part, I was ready to fall 
upon his neck, but not being able to make con- 
nections, I fell on everything else — the capstan, 
the deck, a barrel of new-laid tar, and my own 
resources. At last, the social amenities over, I 
pulled my chest out of my back and let it swell 
with pride. Later there was swelling else- 
where, but no matter. 

"That swordfish had changed my whole life. 
I wanted to live forever after where I could 
meet other members of his family, be in touch 
with his brothers and sisters, ask them up any 
time. To this end, I straightway became a life 
member of the Tuna Fishing Club, with the 
proud degree of S. C. (Swordfish Catcher)." 

"Anything else?" 

"Yes," he hastened to say. "Shortly after 
meeting the swordfish I met Louis B. Mayer." 

"And New York was forgotten?" 

"By no means," protested Mr. Barrymore. 
"I have a terrific feeling of gratitude toward 
the New York public, for, as the saying goes, it 
made me what I am today. I have much the 
same feeling toward Arthur Hopkins. The 
reason Hopkins is particularly interesting to 




Loretta Young has been promoted to 
stardom! This dramatic scene with 
Etienne Girardot is from her first 
starring vehicle, "Born to Be Bad" — 
story of the "customers' girl racket" 



me as a stage producer is that all the plays in 
which I appeared under his management — 
'Redemption,' 'The Jest,' 'Richard III,' and 
'Hamlet' — were taken off when we were selling 
out. It means a lot for a producer to do that 
against the good of his own pocketbook. But 
it is immensely for the good of the actor. He 
should not be kept in a part until it becomes 
mechanical to him." 

"What does the screen offer to the stage 
actor?" I inquired. 

"Primarily, lack of repetition," said Mr. 
Barrymore. "There is nothing so deadly to 
the actor as repetitious work. During the New 
York run of 'Hamlet,' when we were giving 
eight performances a week, Stanislasky, 
director of the Moscow Art Theater company, 
the finest organization of actors in the world, 
came back to see me one afternoon. 'When 
are you going to play this again?' he asked. 
'Tonight,' I told him. He nearly fell into the 
bass drum. Partially recovering from his 
astonishment, he said that in Russia a play 
was never given more than two or three times 
a week. 

"CTRANGELY enough," pursued Mr. Barry- 
'-'more, "it is only in our country and Eng- 
land that plays are put on for long runs. Of 
course, no matter how long he plays it, there 
always is something new for an actor to learn 
in a part like Hamlet. Yet, two years later, 
when I played it in London, I found a tre- 
mendous gain from the rest." 

"Do you find much the same rest in pic- 
tures? " 

"Yes, because of the change they offer. I 
like it. You can do five pictures a year, but 
you can't do five plays a year. Sometimes it is 
difficult to get a producer sufficiently interested 
to do even one play for you. I felt this when 
'Peter Ibbetson' came into my hands. After 
pondering the matter, I decided to take the 
play to Al Woods, who, though wondrous wise 
in the theater, had not been given to the pro- 
duction of the mystic, nostalgic drama. But I 
thought of a way to approach him on the 
delicate subject. 

" 'Al,' I began, 'I've got a fine play, and I'd 
like you to do it.' 

" 'What's it about, sweetheart?' he wanted 
to know. 

" 'Well,' I informed him, 'there's a scene in 
which Lionel calls me a dirty name and I hit 
him over the head with a club.' 

" 'I'll take it!' he promptly declared." 

Then Mr. Barrymore recalled: 

"•"THAT was an interesting question of yours 
*■ as to what the screen offers the stage actor. 
For one thing, I think it's just as well for an 
actor to have had some stage training before 
going into talking pictures, though I wouldn't 
say it is absolutely necessary. There have been 
miraculous exceptions. After all, there's 
nothing new or mysterious about human 
speech. The only thing an actor needs to do is 
speak naturally. And it's not so much how 
he acts as how he behaves. Above all, he must 
be careful in front of the camera, which en- 
larges the face five times. If he acts there as 
he had acted on the stage he will find he is 
giving a remarkably good imitation of St. 
Vitus." 

"You suffered from that trouble?" I sym- 
pathetically inquired. 

"I nearly died of it," he groaned. "Worse, 
my early parts in silent pictures involved 
serious complications. I was in tights so often 
that I felt like Frankie Bailey glorifying Weber 
and Fields. Then, too, those dark green 
romantic roles, with hair closely resembling 
clinging ivy, made me look as though I had 
lived for centuries in ruined castles. I used to 



Photoplay Magazine for February, 1934 



feel deeply grateful that I was spared, at least, 
the ordeal of coming before the curtain in that 
bizarre get-up, as might have been the case 
on the stage. 

"The screen actor may well be thankful that 
he is saved the terrifying experience of making 
a curtain speech. When his picture has its 
premiere — I believe that is the accepted term 
— he can run home, lock himself in, and feel 
a certain sense of protection. That's why I 
keep a dog." 

When I remarked that he seemed to be 
working very hard these days, Mr. Barrymore 
made the surprising confession: 

"I've got to work to keep from being 
afraid of the 'big bad wolf.' " 

"Why — have you ever been broke?" 

"Have I ever been broke!" he yelped. 
"During my earlier years that was my normal 
condition. In New York I knew the entire 
free lunch route from Third Avenue to Tenth. 
What's more, I knew the special days on which 
my good friends, the bartenders, set out hot 
dishes. If there's one thing I pride myself on, 
it's as a free lunch authority." 

ALL the Barrymores have, in their time, 
been on short rations. Ethel Barrymore 
once told me that while tramping the streets 
looking for a job in London she lived for two 
weeks on a bag of dates. 

"Which would you say is worse," I now 
asked her younger brother, "being broke in 
New York or in Hollywood?" 

"That's a fine distinction I hesitate to 
make," he faltered. "But sometime ago I 
read an amazing article in a Los Angeles news- 
paper telling of a fellow who lived for two years 
on ten cents a day. He squatted in the Holly- 
wood hills. But where in New York are you 
going to find a place to squat for a week, let 
alone two years? My best record was two 
nights, under a bench in a New York park, 
when the cops routed me out. I sank into 
sweet slumber both nights gazing raptly at a 
weather-beaten statue of Farragut. Indeed, 
I all but qualified for membership in the Farra- 
gut Club. 

"You never heard of it? Let me say, then, 
that it was a most exclusive club, founded by 
Oliver Herford, who was inspired by the same 
statue, seen from under the same bench in 
exactly the same circumstances as my own. 
Whether his rest was disturbed in the same 
way I do not know, but I do know that, in 
the interests of the Farragut Club, he went to 
great lengths. He went, no less, to Saranac. 
There, in the Adirondack^, for the good of his 
health, was Robert Louis Stevenson. Night 
had fallen when Herford rapped at his cabin 
door. 

"'I have come,' he announced to his as- 
tounded friend, 'to notify you of your unani- 
mous election to the Farragut Club.' 

"'And what,' inquired the puzzled recipient 
of this signal honor, 'is the Farragut Club?' 

"'I am,' was the proud answer. 'As its 
sole member I elected you.' 

"'But why have a second member?' won- 
dered Stevenson. 

"'For this reason,' whispered Herford. T 
want to blackball Ambrose Bierce, and I don't 
want him to find out who did it.' 

"TUBAT a night that must have been," 

*^ enviously imagined Barrymore, "with 
those two wits in full play! Herford, who had 
tramped all the way there, was dead broke, 
but he didn't give a hoot. When you're 
young you don't mind — you regard it as an 
adventure. 

"But when you're older it's different. Just 
now it's certainly tough on a lot of poor devils. 
You can't help thinking of that 'big bad 
wolf.'" 

At this moment his business manager — a 
born wolf tamer — brought him several checks 
to sign. As John Barrymore busily scratched 
his name, he glanced up with a quizzical smile, 
and admitted: 

"This is a form of calisthenics I loathe." 

Who doesn't? 






>~ 



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94 



Photoplay Magazine for February, 1934 



Fredric March and 




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Photoplay Magazine for February, 1934 



95 



Florence Eldridge 




in a 



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Fredric March co-starring 

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(*Mobiloil Arctic and Mobilgas.) 

Mobilgas 




Cal York's Monthly Broadcast from Hollywood 



[ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 49 | 



A^AYBE there aren't some nervous people 
"Mn Hollywood these days since Mexico has 
declared that those convenient and quick di- 
vorces secured in the states of Chihuahua, 
Morelos, Yucatan and Campeche are invalid. 

And now Jack Holt, Zita Johann, Sidney 
Blackmer, Sally Eilers, Hoot Gibson, Lenore 
Ulrich, Max Baer, Dorothy Dunbar, Richard 
Dix and many others who got Mexican di- 
vorces, are wondering to whom they are married 
and why. 

Sally Eilers married Harry Joe Brown, the 
director, since her divorce from Hoot Gibson. 
Hoot has become seriously interested in June 
Gale and Sidney Blackmer is completely lost to 
Mae Clarke. So what's the answer? 

However, attorneys are trying to find the 
inevitable loop-hole that will make things 
right for their clients. So we shall see just who 
is married to whom in the next few weeks. 

A LISON SKIPWORTH in haste 
*^to get somewhere, took a bus. 
The assembled crowd was slow in 
climbing on. When Skippy had her 
foot on the lower step, her six inches 
of skirt that trails on the ground well 
in hand, the bus-driver saw fit to ad- 
monish, "Step lively, please." 

Skippy impaled the fresh driver with 
one of the best Skipworth glances — 
"Young man," she informed him, "I 
never step lively!" 

r PHAT big new iceberg palace of Jean Har- 
low's, with its white furnishings and white 
rugs, has meant very little to Jean, it seems. 
For all the elaborate white bed upholstered in 
ermine. Jean never slept in it. Instead, she 
slept on a couch in her mother's and father's 
room. And after her marriage to Hal Rosson, 
Jean made a present of the house to her mother. 
'Tis said in Hollywood the home reflected her 
mother's tastes entirely and not Jean's. Which 
may account for Jean's lack of interest in it. 

JANET GAYNOR noticed Stepin 
Fetchit, the colored comic, munch- 
ing on a carrot, and asked if he were 
a vegetarian. 

"Yas'm, I is," drawled Stepin. 
"Don't you ever eat meat?" pur- 
sued Janet. 

"No'm. Only pork chops, thass 
all," assured Step. 

T_TOLLYWOOD gains another place in the 

Blue Book," or New York Social Register, 

by the inclusion of Dorothy Jordan's name this 




Adolphe Menjou and Verree Teasdale are very shy of cameras when they 
are together. But a crafty photographer caught them at the opening of 
"Roman Scandals." Did they deny romantic rumors? They did not! 



year. The reason Dorothy is so honored in this 
criterion of social recognition, no doubt, is 
her marriage, during the past year, to Merian 
C. Cooper, the RKO-Radio head who, in addi- 
tion to having made himself actually important 
by his achievements, is of a socially prominent 
family. 

TTALK as you please, it pays to know the 

right people in Hollywood. For instance, 

one short year ago, Lyle Talbot was practically 



an unknown young man in Hollywood, socially. 
Today, his parents, visiting him in Hollywood, 
are entertained royally by none other than 
Mary Pickford herself. The reason? Well, it 
seems Lyle set out to cultivate the socially 
prominent Countess di Frasso and the Count- 
ess did the rest for Lyle. His name, these days, 
appears on all the exclusive guests lists in 
town. And maybe you think Lyle's studio 
isn't impressed. 

[ PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 126 ] 



Working Girl 



Dancing to her was her job, and she saw 
nothing frivolous or gayly exciting about it. 
Neither did she see anything of which to be 
ashamed. She took jobs dancing in Grau- 
man's prologues and with Fanchon-Marco 
revues, while attending the fashionable West- 
lake School for Girls in Los Angeles. In the 

96 



[ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 70 ] 

daytime she mingled with society debutantes 
and frequently in the evenings danced before 
the footlights. 

She could never understand why her snob- 
bish little schoolmates admired her when she 
danced at school festivals and benefits, but 
arched their eyebrows when they saw her on 



the stage doing the same thing professionally. 
She resented it, because she was doing her 
job and doing it well. She was glad when she 
left school and with it the "snobs" who didn't 
approve of her stage dancing. Strangely 
enough, she was later to portray "society 
types" to achieve her greatest screen triumphs 



in "Animal Kingdom" and "When Ladies 
Meet." Since those two films she played 
"moll roles" in "Penthouse" and "The 
Prizefighter and the Lady." 

Possibly these early resentments caused 
Myrna to cling to a few proved friends; caused 
her later to shy from Hollywood "sets" where 
gossip and unfairness run riot. 

"I have never felt that parties or social 
'politics' of any kind have ever helped an 
actress to success. At least, to lasting success. 
Just as screen roles are definitely apart from 
real life, so studio work can be and should be 
definitely apart from social entanglements. 

"After all, the really important thing in this 
business is to deliver a performance, to make 
yourself valuable — professionally. Every- 
thing else is incidental, and entirely up to 
one's idea of a good time. The old rule of 
'Know thyself' is the most reliable rule a girl 
could choose to follow in Hollywood. 'Know 
thyself and Be thyself.'" 

■pROM her very first "bit" role, Myrna Loy 
•*- has studied her every part thoroughly be- 
fore facing the camera. She has had to, because 
even every bit was a character bit, and from 
the first, a character with which she was 
entirely unfamiliar. 

Imagine a girl of nineteen undertaking the 
portrayal of a temperamental Russian mistress, 
or Lucrezia Borgia's chief poisoner as she did 
in "Don Juan." 

It was in this picture that John Barrymore 
taught her the importance of correct costume. 
She was amazed to see the star go down to the 
wardrobe every day and carefully inspect all 
the costumes to be used in the scenes. It 
impressed her tremendously, as such meticu- 
lous interest was rare in those days. 

Ever since then she has been extra careful 
about every costume she has worn, and fre- 
quently makes them herself to be sure they're 
right. It's good business. 

During the days, or rather, the years in 
which she was the perennial dark feminine 
menace of the screen, and was playing every- 
thing from Oriental houris to depraved 
maniacs, she made a point of going deep into 
the psychology, and even the religion, of her 
distasteful screen characters. 

" I never quite believed in them," she admits 
today, "but I had to attribute some sort of 
phobia to them to make them real. I had to 
understand how anyone could be like that, in 
order to make it convincing on the screen." 

All the time, she wanted desperately to get 
away from the sinister run of parts, because 
she realized she was being hopelessly relegated 
to that unsympathetic type, but at the same 
time, she deliberately set about being ade- 
quate, even perfect in them — because it was 
good business to give a good performance! 

She is frank in stating that she intends to 
"make hay while the sun shines." 

"One's life in this profession is not long. 
You have to make your money while you can 
so you will have enough for the future," she 
observes wisely. 

Up until recently Myrna has lived with her 
mother and brother, quite modestly. She still 
lives modestly, although by herself in a rented 
house in Santa Monica. It is quiet out there, 
and remote. She can rest and read, keep 
physically and mentally fit. 

■"PHERE'S only one thing which will make 
•*■ her stop being essentially a working girl — 
marriage. She admits it has almost happened 
several times. 

"But I don't think I would ever give up 
my screen career entirely for marriage," Myrna 
Loy states frankly. 

Of course, there's an obvious answer to that. 

She could marry someone who also has a 
screen career to think about. 

But when I mentioned it, there was dead 
silence. 

For Hollywood's working girl is nothing if 
not discreet. 

And Ramon Novarro is one person she just 
won't talk about! 



Photoplay Magazine for February, 

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Last Round-Up 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 40 



"Westerns have been badly hurt," says 
Ken, "by cheap pictures — quickies. A bill- 
board for a bad Western can be just as exciting 
and attractive as one for a real picture of merit. 
But the public has been fooled often, and a lot 
of people don't like it." 

A /f AYNARD protects his reputation by put- 
■'■'■Ming money, often his own private funds, 
into his pictures. He won't allow them to be 
rushed out, regardless of quality, for quick 
returns. 

"Another thing," continues Ken, "I have 
stuck to the old West, its authentic characters, 
action and thrills. I keep in the plains and 
the mountains; I use stage coaches, Indians, 
bad men. I'll stick to the true Western to the 
last ditch. Cowboy stars turning aviators 
and mixing Western with modern thrills have 
dug their own graves as cowboy stars. 

"But the most serious menace to the con- 
tinued life of the Western picture is that 
today there are no training schools. No new 
stars are coming on who can ride and rope and 
shoot and do the spectacular Western action 
stunts that make a rough riding picture popu- 
lar. There aren't any more Wild West shows 
like those of Buffalo Bill and Pawnee Bill, 
where all of us cowpokes learned the fancy 
riding and colorful show stuff which a regular 
ranch hand never had time to learn, and never 
will. It threatens soon to be a lost art — and a 
Western has to have it." 

But Col. Tim McCoy disagrees with May- 
nard on the story question. Says the Colonel: 

"Westerns have been 'rubber-stamped' out 
of popularity. I quit making them, because 
as a real Westerner myself I resented the far- 



fetched, ridiculous stories that were given me. 
A good story is a good story, whether it's laid 
in the North, South, East or West — and the 
same is true of a bad one. Most of the 
Westerns have been bad ones." 

And George O'Brien, who has been one of 
the most successful Western stars, although 
never rode the range in his life, advocated the 
"sophisticated Western," paying more at- 
tention to the subtleties of characterization 
and drama, and less to the stock catalogue of 
Western thrills. 

"The difficulty is in getting new angles for 
Western pictures," he believes. "I'd still 
like to make about two Westerns a year, but 
that's about all the actually good stories I 
would be able to find." 

TS/TOW the funny thing about it all is that 
■*- ^ apparently people still do want badly to see 
Westerns — not only the kids but the grown-ups. 
Since the news was scattered about George 
O'Brien's decision to quit, letters have poured 
in asking him "please not to stop." Tom 
Mix's retirement drew a similar flood of pro- 
tests. Ken Maynard receives, almost daily, 
letters from parents praising him for supplying 
the "only moral type of picture fit for our 
children to see." 

Westerns are still tremendously popular 
abroad. George O'Brien, on a recent trip, 
was entertained by the Sultan of Jolo in his 
bamboo theater with his thirteen wives, he 
was going to show him a real American cow- 
boy film, " Whispering Smith Rides" — a film 
George had seen as a boy! 

Ken Maynard even owes his life to his 
Western screen exploits. Not long ago, on a 



flight from Campeche to Merida, Ken was 
forced down in the wilds of Yucutan and 
surrounded by savages, who suddenly bowed 
to him and helped him take off again. They 
knew Ken. Somehow, they had seen his 
pictures and liked him! 

And recently, during the Olympic Games, 
the athletes from abroad were surprisingly 
blase when the currently important screen 
stars visited the training village — but Tom 
Mix's arrival almost caused a riot! 

But while Westerns may eventually come 
back, surely the grand old days of cowboy 
pictures are gone forever. 

The days when even the clothes the cowboy 
stars wore set styles in Hollywood; when 
horses went to banquets; when the cowboy 
influence pervaded every phase of Hollywood 
life have passed into memory. 

/~^\NE former school teacher from " 'way 
^Maown East" once came to Hollywood to 
direct pictures and, a week after he had 
arrived, showed up at the old Montmartre 
cafe weighted down with six-guns and pro- 
ceeded to flip bowie knives into the expensive 
woodwork. 

Eddie Brandstatter, the proprietor, rushed 
to him, only to be rudely shoved aside, and 
to hear a strange hybrid Eastern Yankee 
twang mixed with a Texas drawl advise him: 

"Lope on, thar, stranger, I'm a-practicin' 
agin' my neighbor. He kicked my dawg, an' I 
aim to settle it in the good old Western 
way!" 

He had gone completely Western in a week ! 

That was when Hollywood was a real cow- 
town! 



Drums in the Jungle 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 80 J 



had gone savage, back across the continents 
and ages! 

The beat of the drums pulsed faster and 
I looked 'round to see a solid circle of hundreds 
of black faces peering through the spaces be- 
tween the trees, the same wrapt expression and 
hideously rolling eyes, the weird rhythm of the 
drums of the night sunk deep into their super- 
stitious souls. 

I was afraid. I felt them closing in on me, 
nearer; nearer. 

THEN I saw a tall and beautiful dark-skinned 
girl (Fredi Washington), clothed only in a 
short beaded skirt, brassiere and barbaric silver 
bracelets. 

She began to dance exquisitely, passionately, 
before the idol. Suddenly she paused, and 
lighting a fagot fire, she drew the body of a 
white woman within the circle of light. She 
was about to cast her into the heart of the 
flames. 

A negro appeared and laughed. He held up 
a necklace and then threw it into the fire. 
"There! I've thrown your charm into the 
fire. Your power over the white woman is de- 
stroyed!" The unconscious girl opened her 
eyes. The heroine was saved! 

"Terrible!" rasps an American voice across 
the frail tissue of my vision. The scene crum- 
ples. 

The magic daylight wanes. The beat of 
the tom-toms dies away. 

I knew all along, subconsciously, that it was 
only a movie scene. But there was something 
horribly real about all this. There was a mystic 



drama going on within the drama into which 
that little "white company" had been drawn 
despite themselves. 

Even under the ordinary electrics, I hardly 
recognized my old friends — ghostly, haggard, 
drawn and nervous. 

"Lights!" The movie had to go on — and on 
■ — and on. 

Under that unearthly glare they looked like 
the cadavers of that sprightly galaxy that had 
boarded the "Haiti" on a bright noonday, 
seven weeks before. 

"On the job there you!" snapped Terwili- 
ger irritably. "We want to get out of here 
alive!" Out there he looked ludicrously 
Hollywood in his sleeveless sweater and riding 
boots. 

The blacks sullenly took their places, squat- 
ting again on cocoanut shells that looked more 
like skulls. 

It was quite obvious that they were fearful of 
this tampering with black magic. 

T WAS impressed by the service revolver the 
-*■ assistant director carried in a holster on his 
belt. 

I saw many rolling eyes fixed on it, too. 

"Silence! I don't want to tell you fellows 
out there not to talk or walk about again!" 

"Roll 'em over!" bawls the assistant into 
the darkness to the distant sound wagon. 

"Okay!" comes back. 

"Action!" shouts the director. 

"One of those women is out of line again!" 
yells the look-out from his crow's nest in the 
lighting scaffolding. 



"Hold it!" 

"Fifty feet lost," records the fellow with his 
eye at the sight of the traveling camera that 
Carl Burger is riding like a farm tractor. 

"Action!" 

"Camera okay?" 

" It never was — the snake went dead on us! "' 
The pickaninny who was supposed to keep the 
trick snake wriggling 'round the idol's neck had 
gone sound asleep. 

"Another scene gone to blazes!" groans Ter- 
wiliger. "Shoot her over again." 

"DANG! Total darkness. The power plant out 
■'-'of commission again. Two hundred feet 
more of film N.G. Take and retake. Every- 
body, sweating and fuming; fanning themselves, 
swatting or jabbing at vicious poisonous in- 
sects. 

"Lay off everbody! Chow! Grub!" 

My appearance caused a sensation, not of 
surprise, but because they were hungry for 
something, anyone, from the sweet white 
world. The blacks had slunk out in outer dark- 
ness. All my movie friends were there but one. 
I asked about him. 

"He passed away," was all they would say. 

A great winged insect, the size of a small 
sparrow, lighted on Fredi Washington's body 
and her maid began to annoint her and wrap 
her in towels. 

"If I weren't sprayed with disinfectant from 
head to foot every hour of the day and night, 
I wouldn't be here to tell the tale," she said 
sitting up and smiling. 

We were all sitting around on cocoanut shells, 



Photoplay Magazine for February, 1934 



tom-toms and banana tree trunks, pretending 
to eat supper at 2:30 a.m. Anything to keep 
away from the ground where the ants would 
gnaw you to the bone in a few minutes. But 
there was no way of escaping the ticks that 
festered under your skin. And the over-sized 
jungle grasshoppers and crickets nosed into 
everything, including your ears. The mos- 
quitoes never let up. 

" TT'S this mist from the swamp the cloudburst 

-'•left," explained Terwiliger. "Two of our 
black men living in the cooley were drowned in 
that downpour — and that didn't set so well on 
our voodoo violation either. Why, we had to 
burn up hundreds of gallons of gasoline trying 
to dry up the mud, and I don't know how many 
loads of sand we dumped in to make passage 
possible. Twenty-four inches of rain in twenty- 
four hours!" 

"And you should have seen the big cyclone 
that hit us — and two little ones," put in Bur- 
ger. " Ripped out our whole outfit that it took 
a week to build! Certainly, we're working 
against a jinx!" 

"If you want to get a turn, just look at the 
Big Dipper turned upside down in the heavens," 
observed Winnie Harris. " Things are all wrong 
out here, I tell you. That old woman witch 
doctor who says she is two hundred years old 
has been giving me dirty looks all evening." 

"There's another rooster crowing!" wailed 
the director. "They bring them here and park 
them nearby on a string — against my orders. 
Game cocks, you know, and they live and 
sleep with them and have all sorts of supersti- 
tions about them. People back home will think 
we're near a barnyard, if they hear a rooster 
crow!" 

■"THEN the call back to work. "On the job. 
*■ Come on now, let's cut down this penal ser- 
vitude!" The tom-toms begin their ceaseless 
beat, the jungle closes in. And so, all through 
the night, to the tune of flying, whizzing, bit- 
ing creatures, and the occasional yelp of a beast 
in the jungle. 

The pitiless white glare, endless cigarettes, 
the distant rumble of the power plant — till 
the crack of dawn. Then we all make our 
way more dead than alive back to the Myrtle- 
bank Hotel. Marie Paxton, the heroine, moans, 
"Oh, I |can't sleep! I can't sleep in these 
glaring, burning days!" 

And some day when millions of people thrill 
to this magnificent spectacle of jungle pano- 
rama and shudder over the revelation of black 
magic, some will say, "What a life! These 
movie people! Haven't they got it soft? Big 
salaries, going on a picnic to the West Indies 
and living on milk and honey! Sure, maybe 
they do put in a few hours a day making a pic- 
ture like that. But what of it?" 

Yes, indeed, what of it? If you can take it. 



Heart Throb 



Two years ago I was a "live wire" 
enjoying life. Then, a serious acci- 
dent, in which my ankle and knee 
were broken. 

I had no books to study, no talkies 
to choose from, no "stars" to watch, 
but I recovered only to find my eyes 
were affected and an operation took 
one eye from me. The other I feel 
will follow. 

I've a hard battle to fight. Per- 
haps some day I will have only mem- 
ories to help me on my way. But the 
"stars" still glisten and, if I can see 
them no more, I know someone will 
talk to me of the happenings in 
movieland. 

Mrs. Charlotte H. Twombly, 
Laconia, N. H. 




Pain is nature's warning that teeth are 
diseased. The cause of pain is usually 
decay and an important cause of decay 
is the invisible film on teeth that 
science calls "Bacterial Plaque." 



Contrast the attitude of the 
eavage below who files his 
teeth with that of the mod- 
ern young woman who keeps 
her teeth white and beauti- 
ful through daily use of 
Pepsodent. 




Modern children may well be 

expected to have far better 

teeth than .heir ancestors. 



THE actual cause of 
the aching tooth is 
now believed to be due 
to gases, formed inside 
the tooth during the 
process of decay, that 
may or may not be vis- 
ible to the dentist from 
the outside.These gases 
expand and press on 
the sensitive nerves of 
the tooth. 

Dental science an- 
swers the question of 
what leads to tooth de- 
cay by saying that food 
particles have been 
permitted to remain 
and spoil between the 
teeth and under the 
gums. Germs formed in and by this decaying 
food make acids which attack the cement- 
like structure of the teeth and dissolve it. 
•When enough of the tooth material has 
decayed away, there is left only a thin cov- 
ering for the nerve of the tooth — pain or 
toothache result. 

The germs that cause the decay-produc- 
ing acids have a friend in the film-coat, or 
mucin plaque, which forms on teeth. This 
film glues the bacteria to the teeth, pro- 
viding shelter and food for germs. 

Removal of film has therefore become an 
important problem for dental science. One 
of the most notable discoveries in this field 
was made recently in the laboratories of 
The Pepsodent Company when a new and 
revolutionary cleansing mate- 
rial was developed. The cleans- 
ing and polishing material is 
the part of any tooth paste that I 
does the work. Herein lies 
the difference between the 




Cross-section of a tooth showing 
structure beneath the enamel. 



best tooth paste and inferior brands. 
Most cleansing materials are either 
so hard and abrasive that they 
scratch the tooth enamel or else 
they are so soft that they fail to 
remove film and stains. To develop 
a material that would outrank 
others both in effectiveness and in 
safety required several years and the 
assistance of the ablest scientific 
minds in the country. 

This new discovery is contained 
in Pepsodent Tooth Paste exclu- 
sively. Because it is twice as soft as 
the material most commonly used, 
Pepsodent is looked upon as the 
modern standard of safety. At the 
same time this new material stands unique 
in its power to cleanse and polish teeth. 
r- — — -i 

FREE— N>- D ay Tube 





THE PEPSODENT CO. 

Dept.ll2,919No. Michigan Ave., 

Chicago 
Mail 10-Day Tube of Pepsodent to 

Name 

Address 

City t 

This coupon is not good after July 31, 1934. 
Only one tube to a family 



And Here We See The Real "Little Women" 



[ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 75 ] 



"Amos Bronson Alcott, their father, was a 
dreamer. A most impractical man who never 
seemed to be able to reconcile his high ethical 
standards to the business of living. He was a 
spiritual sort of person, far ahead of his time. 
And eventually, when his lifetime dream of a 
little school of philosophy came to realization, 
he was so very happy. 

"TDUT even that little school didn't last. 

-'-'And at the time he closed it, the family were 
in dire circumstances. It was Ralph Waldo 
Emerson who came to their rescue with five 
hundred dollars. 

"Strange," Mrs. Pratt mused, "how family 
traits are handed down from one generation to 
another. 

"'Meg' was just like her father. She was 
my husband's mother and I can notice very 
often the same 'dreamer' qualities in my own 
daughter. 

"'High thought and low diet' we used to 
call it in the old days. But that's the tendency 
which has done so much for world develop- 
ment, isn't it? Where would we be if it weie 
not for the dreamers?" Mrs. Pratt smile 1 
indulgently. 

"Little 'Amy' was so tjpical of May Alcott." 
Mrs. Pratt said, after a moment. "May wis 
forever dressing up and playing grand lady. 
She always wanted her curly hair to be in r er- 
fect order and she took great pains to get those 
curls up in papers every night. 

"May had a talent for painting and sketch- 
ing, too. And once, when she decided to be 
very, very independent, she went so far as to 
join a Boston stock company and act in plays. 

" See," Mrs. Pratt pointed to some water col- 
ors in wide, old-fashioned frames on that 
parlor wall, " those are some of May's pictures. 
Ihey're considered good by critics. 

" A A AY never could make up her mind 
•'•''■'•whether she wanted to follow a career 
like her sister Louisa did, or whether she 
wanted marriage. It was a very modern point 
of view for a girl in our generation. 

"But when she was thirty-eight, she met a 
man in London with whom she fell in love. 
His name was Ernest Xieriker, a Swiss gentle- 
man. May married him. Two years later 
little May died in Paris where they had gone 



to live so she could continue with her art 
study. May left an infant daughter. 

"Louisa sent for the child and found much 
of her happiness rearing the little girl. The 
child had been named Louisa May Nieriker. 
And she and Louisa were almost like mother 
and daughter until the girl grew up. Then her 
father returned from Europe, claimed his 
daughter, and took her to his home in Zurich. 
She is now the wife of Emil Rasim and lives in 
Vienna. 

" But the loss of the girl was a great blow 
to Louisa. She missed more and more having 
someone to love and care for as her fortunes 
increased and she grew older. 

" ' I 'HE old Orchard house was sold then. The 

-*- girls had married and Louisa had lost pos- 
session of her niece. The old house had been 
their family home for a good many years. 
Louisa came to live with us in this house which 
the Alcotts had once occupied. And it was 
here, in closest family contact, we learned to 
really appreciate 'Aunt Louisa' for the' fine 
person she was. She represented the clear- 
thinking, independent, new kind of woman 
this generation was to develop. Her advanced 
ideas about life were fascinating. Later on, 
Louisa adopted her nephew, John Alcott Pratt, 
who was my husband's brother. The longing 
for the old family atmosphere was always with 
her and she tried for years to recapture the 
spirit which had prevailed when they were all 
together. 

"Louisa bought a house in Boston and set 
up her own housekeeping. And while the 
place was more spacious and much more luxuri- 
ous than she had ever enjoyed during her girl- 
hood, she still clung to the homey atmosphere 
of quiet simplicity. 

"Poor little 'Beth' never was very well- 
known by anyone. She passed away too young 
to have had romance touch her life. One by 
one, in later years, the girls followed. First it 
was Mrs. Alcott, their fine, strong-minded, 
practical mother, who slipped quietly out of 
this world to be with 'Beth'. Mrs. Alcott had 
pulled her family of little women through many 
a tight place by her practical sense and good 
sound judgment. 

"Then, early in March of 1888, Mr. Alcott, 
who had been ill for some time, failed rapidly. 



Louisa drove in from Dunreath Place, Rox- 
bury, where she, too, was under treatment. 
She came in to her town house to see her 
father, conscious that it was for the last time. 
"Early next morning she was in a serious 
condition herself. And on March 6th, Louisa 
passed quietly on to the rest which she so 
much needed. She never knew that her father 
had already preceded her by two days. 

T" OUISA had done a good job all her life 

■'-'for the little women who comprised her 
family." 

Mrs. Pratt stopped speaking. It was the 
end of her memories. 

She had been taken by her daughter to see 
the picture production of Aunt Louisa Alcott's 
immortal novel. It was the first talking pic- 
ture Mrs. Pratt had ever witnessed. 

" I liked Katharine Hepburn's fine work," 
she said, when we asked her if it was true to 
the old atmosphere and spirit of the girls as 
she knew them. 

"Miss Hepburn was a perfect choice for 
Louisa (Jo). She typified her fine spirit 
throughout the entire picture. Little Amy 
(played by Joan Bennett) was very much like 
May Alcott, even to the curls and the scrib- 
bling and her grand lady mannerisms. Meg 
(played by Frances Dee) was so very much 
the woman I knew as Anna Alcott, my own 
mother-in-law, that her presence on the screen 
brought back a thousand memories to me." 

A/f RS. PRATT never knew little ' Beth'. The 
■'"■'■girl had passed away before she had mar- 
ried into their family. But from what the sisters 
had related of Beth, Jean Parker had caught her 
character to perfection. And Jean looked as 
Beth did, too — a little wistful always, with 
wide, innocent eyes and a round face. To Mr. 
Harold Hendee, who had duplicated in the 
studio sets, the atmosphere of the Alcott fam- 
ily life, Mrs. Pratt sent her sincere appreciation. 
As I was leaving this lovely old room, my 
eye caught a framed motto, painted by May 
Alcott long ago. It was suspended against the 
faded old wall paper of that little parlor and 
it proclaimed to all the world that: "A good 
name is more to be envied than great riches." 
The spiritual guide which those little women 
have radiated through all the years. 



Why I Quit Hollywood 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 54 ] 



made that inevitable. So far as any chance 
for acting is concerned my part wouldn't have 
taxed the ability of an extra man. 

"With all due shame I have to admit that 
the money they offered me to play the role 
tempted me into making a chump of myself. 
It was a ridiculously huge salary they dangled 
in front of me — and I fell." 

T^OUG, JR. had about finished saying this 
■'—'when a sudden offer came for him to go 
back to Hollywood. It was an enticing contract 
offered by RKO-Radio. He turned it down 
fiat. 

Then came a copy of the play, "Success 
Story," they wanted him to do. Fairbanks, 
Jr. read it over. It was exactly the sort of 
thing he liked doing. A one-man starring 
vehicle peculiarly fitted to his talents. And 
for that reason alone he cabled that he would 
return. 



It might have been a little embarrassing 
afier this diatribe on Hollywood. But the 
explanation of his sudden change of plans 
sounded logical. Yet Doug insists he will 
never return to Hollywood picture-making 
permanently. He's well established with 
London Films, Ltd., and his trips to Holly- 
wood from now on will be flyers, for special 
assignments only. 

"For the first time in years I'm utterly 
happy. I've never had so much fun in my life 
as I've had making 'Catherine the Great.' 
Naturally I've no idea what John Public is 
going to say when he sees the picture. It may 
be a box-office flop. But whatever its fate, 
it's the most worth while thing I've ever done. 

"And so with the other pictures that are 
lined up for me. I believe in every one of 
them. They are all the kind of thing I want 
most to do. And the men with whom I'm 
working — from Alexander Korda down — are 



all inspired with an ambition to prove that 
commercialism doesn't necessarily have to 
enter into successful picture-making. 

" Creativeness — in Hollywood — is as little 
appreciated as it is suspected. 

"Think of the hundreds of thousands of 
dollars that have been spent on boosting me as 
a star! And what I have to say about myself 
goes for dozens of other men upon whose 
starring careers tremendous sums of money 
have been squandered. 

SQUANDERED is the right word. For 
what inevitably happens to every one of 
those male stars? In every case, sooner or later, 
they find themselves cast in a role like mine in 
'Morning Glory.' And that is the beginning 
of the end. For you can't play fast and loose 
with your public. 

"When they pay their good money to see a 
star they expect to get their money's worth 



100 



Photoplay Magazine for February, 1934 



IOI 



out oi seeing him do his stuff. If they discover 
he is actually of about as much importance in 
the cast as any of the other bit players, they 
not unreasonably feel cheated. And it is the 
star who has to shoulder the blame. Those 
admirers of his who now decide he has for- 
feited all right to their admiration are off him 
for life! 

"Hollywood hasn't destroyed Harold Lloyd 
and Charlie Chaplin. But they're their own 
bosses. 

"Nobody can do them any damage. The 
picture may be good or bad — but at least it 
will be a star vehicle. 

"But this cannot be truthfully said of any 
other male star in Hollywood. I haven't the 
slightest doubt that the biggest (male) star 
would be sacrificed — if his bosses thought that 
by so doing they could add to the box-office 
value of some new girl. 

" HTHE proved popularity of a George Arliss 

■^ or a Charles Laughton means nothing to 
those who run the Hollywood show. Where, they 
will ask you, is their sex appeal? Box-office 
magnets they'll admit they are — but they 
don't know the reason why this is so. 

"Unaware of the public's appreciation of 
great acting, they are mystified when a Marie 
Dressier or a Katharine Hepburn packs 'em in. 
Such as these truly great artists — in the lan- 
guage of the film factory chieftains — are 
freaks.' 

"And so with every male star in Hollywood ! 
The best that any of them can look forward 
to is the ignominy of finding himself cast oppo- 
site the woman star who is momentarily in the 
ascendant. 

"And to submit to that sort of thing is too 
stultifying for most men. 

"Imagine a Coquelin consenting to appear 
as Bernhardt's leading man! 

"Picture what Henry Irving would have 
had to say to the suggestion that he 'feed' 
a woman star of his day, however great she 
might have been. 

"Why, even such an incurably romantic lover 
as Nat Goodwin — at the height of his in- 
fatuation for the beautiful Maxine Elliott — 
was the star of the plays in which they 
appeared together! 

" When they talk 'sex' in Hollywood — and it 
takes an earthquake of the first order to 
interrupt that talk — they think in terms of 
beaded eyelashes and lipstick-smeared mouths. 
To listen to them you'd think the female of 
the species is not only more deadly than the 
male — you'd discover the only excuse for 
the existence of mere males is to serve as un- 
worthy recipients of beautiful sirens' favors. 

"So long as Hollywood has the money to 
spend, she will continue to be able to lure 
male actors of ability to come in support of 
some woman star of no particular importance. 
But sooner or later, unless I am very much 
mistaken, more and more of the worth while 
males of Hollywood will reach the conclusion 
at which I arrived a long time ago. 

"When they do, they will follow my ex- 
ample and bid Hollywood a permanent fare- 
well. 

"And then they will hie themselves to this 
tight little isle where there is no mawkish 
sentimentality about the fair sex, where men 
still rule the roost, where 'sex' (in the Holly- 
wood sense) is called by its right name and 
appraised at its true, unimportant value. 

"T MAY not make so much money out of 
•*- these British-made films as I have made in 
the past in Hollywood — but at least I'll go on 
having a grand, glorious time. And I'll make 
only pictures which I honestly believe are 
worth while. And I'll be the star of those 
pictures. 

"Not one of those three statements can be 
truthfully made by any male star on the pay- 
roll of any Hollywood film factory today. For 
at the moment any such star may find himself 
elected to do a stooge act — precisely as hap- 
pened to me in 'Morning Glory.'" 

And that would seem to be that! 




'It's funny, Molly — Peggy's always loved the ride before. But she's 
been acting just this way for a whole week!" 




"She's not hungry, either. I've found, Nan, that these symptoms mean 
it's time for a laxative. Give Peggy Fletcher's Castoria tonight." 




"We want to report that Peggy's fine today — a perfect lamb! We 
both can't thank you enough for suggesting Fletcher's Castoria." 

"A good laxative was all the child needed, Nan. And Fletcher's Castoria is 
made especially for children. It's easy to take — tastes good, and hasn't any 
of the strong drugs in it that make most grown-up laxatives so harsh. But 
one word of caution — make sure that the signature Chas. H. Fletcher 

is always on your carton!" 

i^ST CASTORIA 

The children's laxative 

• from babyhood to 11 years • 

Mother, whenever your child needs a laxative — for the relief of constipation, for 
colic due to gas, for diarrhea due to improper diet, for sour stomach, flatulence, acid 
stomach, and as the very first treatment for colds — give Chas. H. Fletcher's Castoria. 




Casseroles 



Sup 



rente 



Her casseroles in oven, Margaret Lindsay, pretty Warners 
player, is ready to return for a chat with her guests 

102 



IF you are having guests for Sunday night supper and 
want to be sure of the success of your meal, casseroles 
will do the trick. 

It is the ideal time of year for this sort of dish. 
" Most housewives have their kitchen ovens turned on any- 
way. So," says Margaret Lindsay, "why not just pop in 
an appetizing casserole or two?" 

They may be prepared in advance, leaving but a few 
minutes work before serving. 

And, remember, casserole dishes should come to the 
table sizzling hot. 

One of Margaret's favorite cold-weather dishes is plain, 
old-fashioned beans. 

Get the Lady Washington variety, and for a small 
casserole, soak 1 cup of beans in water overnight. Next 
morning, bring them to a boil with a little baking soda. 
Pour this water off, and rinse in a colander with cold water. 
Then place beans in a casserole with about }/i pound of salt 
pork buried in the center. Pour over a mixture of 3^ cup 
black molasses, Yi teaspoon mustard, 1 teaspoon salt, 
mixed in a cup of water. Add enough boiling water to just 
cover beans. Cover casserole tightly, and bake in slow 
oven for four hours. 

A variation may be achieved by adding several onions, 
celery and green peppers, cut up. 

Here is a macaroni au gratin recipe which Margaret says 
is the best she has ever used. 

Break macaroni in small pieces (or use the elbow variety) 
and cook until tender in rapidly boiling salted water. 
Drain. Place a layer of macaroni in casserole, then a layer 
of sliced hard-boiled egg and grated American cheese. 
Alternate macaroni, egg, and cheese, seasoning each layer 
with pepper and paprika. 

When casserole is filled, pour Y% cup of cream over con- 
tents and cover with a final layer of cheese, and buttered 
bread crumbs. Bake fifteen minutes, or until top layer is 
nicely browned. 

Chicken en casserole — Cut two small chickens in pieces 
for serving. Season with salt and pepper and moisten with 
melted butter. Bake in casserole dish in hot oven for 
fifteen minutes. Then add Yl cup of carrots that have been 
parboiled and fried in butter with a little onion, and 1 cup 
of potato balls. Pour over \Y cups of brown sauce, and 
again season to taste with salt and pepper. Cover tightly 
and bake in moderate oven for twenty minutes longer, or 
until chicken is tender. 

Apple Custard — Scald 1 cup of milk and pour over Yl 
cup wafer-thin slices of apple. Beat 1 egg, add 2 table- 
spoons sugar and stir into cooled milk and apple mixture. 
Add pinch of salt and Y teaspoon vanilla. Sprinkle top 
with grapenuts and nutmeg and a little cinnamon. Bake 
in slow oven about forty minutes. Use a casserole, of 
course, but do not cover. 

Another delicious apple dessert is made in the following 
manner: Peel and slice four apples. Place in buttered 
casserole and sprinkle with 1 teaspoon cinnamon, Y tea- 
spoon nutmeg. Add 1 cup water, 1 teaspoon lemon juice. 
Work together 1 cup sugar, % cup flour, and Y cup butter, 
until it is crumbly. Spread these crumbs over the apples. 
Bake, uncovered, in moderate oven for half an hour. 



Photoplay Magazine for February, 1934 



Fan Club 
Happenings 



CHICAGO movie fan clubs have planned 
a "Penny Social" to be held at the 
Hotel Sherman, January 25th. They 
expect a number of gifts from stars they 
sponsor. 

These will be sold along with other gifts 
donated by club members. 

The funds derived will be used to further 
this work. 



A note received by the Photoplay Asso- 
ciation of Movie Fan Clubs from the Buddy 
Rogers Club, 53 Park Blvd., Malverne, New 
York, of which Jacqueline Lee is president, 
states that a one year membership will be 
given free to the first fan who writes to her 
from a foreign country. 

Prospective fan club members may write to 
any of the following clubs and receive a copy 
of their latest bulletin: 

Buddy Rogers Club, 53 Park Blvd., Mal- 
verne, New York. 

Ruth Roland Club, 4822 Meade Ave., 
Chicago, HI. 

Billie Dove Club, 5737 South Artesian Ave.. 
Chicago, HI. 

Johnny Downs Club, 3506 West 64th St., 
Chicago, 111. 

Screen's Fan Club, 66 Milwaukee Ave., 
Bethel, Conn. 

Movie Fan Friendship Club, 226 East Mill 
St.. Staunton, 111. 

Official Joan Crawford Fan Club, 973 Fox 
St., Bronx, New York. 

Bing Crosby Club, 109 Orchard Road, 
Maplewood, N. J. 

Norma Shearer Club, 1947 Broadway, New 
York. 

Along with the "Rambles," official publi- 
cation of the Norma Shearer Club, came a 
beautiful photograph of Jean Harlow. Hans 
Faxdahl, president, always includes one or two 
photographs with each issue. 

Some dandy snapshots of Ruth Roland and 
Lillian Conrad have been received. Miss Con- 
rad is president of the Roland Club. 

She also sent a list of snaps that she has 
for sale of many prominent stars taken in 
various cities. 

A note from the Tri-C Club of Syracuse 
states that Buddy Rogers was their guest at a 
recent dinner-dance. 

Fay E. Zinn, president of the Bing Crosby 
Club, 109 Orchard Road, Maplewood, N. J., 
advises that the club plans a big reception 
for Bing when he makes his contemplated 
personal appearance in New York. 

The Photoplay Association received many 
bulletins last month, including Crosby Com- 
ments, The Rogers Review, Bodil and Her 
Fans, Rambles (Shearer Club), Among the 
Stars (Screen Fan's Club), Peggy Shannon 
News, Ruth's Rambles (Ruth Roland Club), 
The Crawford Chatter, Nils News (Nils 
Asther Club). 

The Association will appreciate word from 
any clubs that have obtained members through 
the publicity received in Photoplay. Many 
inquiries are received each day and we furnish 
these prospects with the name and address of 
the club they desire. 



I0 3 




There's a 

BARGAIN IN BEAUTY 

at your grocer's 



Gloria Stuart, piquant Universal 
Pictures star, has a perfect figure 
for the season's slim-hipped silhou- 
ette, as this delight- 
ful town tailleur 
clearly shows. 



ALL-BRAN 



What a thrill it is to slip into 
these modern clothes — so flattering 
to delicately moulded curves. To 
know, as you wear them, that your 
face is as lovely as your figure, 
your eyes bright with health and 
happiness ! 

To look well in the new styles, 
many of us must reduce. In diet- 
ing, be sure your menu contains 
adequate "bulk" to prevent faulty 
elimination. This condition may 
endanger both health and com- 
plexions. It may be corrected by 
eating a delicious cereal. 

Just ask your grocer for a pack- 
age of Kellogg's All-Bran — rich 
in "bulk" and vitamin B to aid 
regular habits. All-Bran is also a 
good source of iron for the blood. 

The "bulk" in All-Bran is 
much like that in leafy vegetables. 
Two tablespoonfuls daily are 
usually sufficient. How much pleas- 
anter than taking patent medicines ! 

Kellogg's All-Bran is not fat- 
tening. Sold by all grocers in the 
red-and-green package. Made by 
Kellogg in Battle Creek. 




KEEP ON THE SUNNY SIDE OF LIFE 



104 



Photoplay Magazine for February, 1934 




KALMS RELIEVE 

"FUNCTIONAL" PAINS 

QUICKLY 



• It's needless to suffer physically and en- 
dure mental anguish caused by the func- 
tional pains of the period. For Kalms can 
relieve those pains quickly. Headaches, 
neuralgia, pains of neuritis, and muscular 
aches and pains are promptly relieved by a 
small dosage. Kalms were developed in the 
Johnson & Johnson laboratories and contain 
nothing a physician could not endorse for 
the condition indicated. One tablet is enough 
for most cases. Buy Kalms at your druggist's 
in convenient purse-size boxes of 12 tablets. 
Mail coupon below for free sample. 



Johnson & Johnson, New Brunswick, N. J. 
Please send me a FREE Sample of Kalms. 

r P-3 



The Lady Who Laughed at Hollywood 



[ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 77 




each summer the University Players served 
dramatic fare for vacationers. 

Look, Priscilla. Standing next to Charles 
Leatherbee is his best friend, Henry Fonda. 
Hank had just come on from Omaha where 
he'd run a night club, and Charlie cast Peggy 
and him as the leads in the season's first show. 

There they are in costume for "The Devil 
in the Cheese." 

TT was during the run of the play that Peggy 
-*-began to loosen up a little. 

She had been sort of stiff at first, a little clan- 
nish, moody and not disposed to mingle much 
with the gay crowd of Harvard and Princeton 
boys and Vassarand Smith girls who comprised 
the company. 

"Then she fell madly in love with Hank and 
her whole character changed. She was like a 
flower in bloom. 

She'd never been particularly beautiful, but 
she glowed that summer with something more 
lovely than mere beauty. 

"She used to tell us she'd never fallen in love 
before. She'd never had a real affair. Didn't 
think she'd ever have another. That first 



ecstasy was too marvelous to ever try to re- 
capture with anyone else. She was going to 
marry Hank and together they would soar to 
stardom." 

Yes, that's Peggy all right. She was a little 
stouter physically, a little more stolid mentally. 
The same rough clothes she made famous in 
Hollywood, too. 

Cape Cod laughed at those dirty corduroy 
slacks and plain pongee shirts long before be- 
jeweled movie stars raised their mascara over a 
colleague's costume. 

Turn the page, Priscilla, the New York pic- 
tures come next. 

A boy who was in the cast of "The Modern 
Virgin," her first big Broadway hit, pasted this 
one in our imaginary album. 

" She was still in love with Hank the winter 
the critics gave her columns and the audiences 
adulation. 

"I used to see them walking around New 
York, hatless, hand in hand, courting like two 
kids in their 'teens, fresh and unspoiled. 

"They didn't have much money, but to look 
at them you'd think they owned the old 
island." 



Name — 
Address- 




7=$EP A/&GR 



"He's the worst hen-pecked man in Hollywood — 
he's a yes-man all day and a yes-ma'm all night" 



Photoplay Magazine for February, 1934 



They dined in pocket handkerchief gardens 
behind Greenwich Village restaurants and the 
viands seemed more savory than any on Park 
Avenue. 

They danced amid Don Dickerman's frolic- 
some decorations in funny little cellars and en- 
joyed it more than the Ritz. 

They subwayed to Brooklyn at night to view 
the panorama of New York's bizarre fairyland 
of lights. 

They took the ferry to Staten Island, relish- 
ing it more than a Mediterranean cruise. 

They rode on bus-tops up Riverside Drive 
with keener thrills than many who race im- 
ported motors along the Corniche. 

They sat on park benches in the Square 
watching the pigeons with more pleasure than 
richer romantics find in grandstand boxes at 
the Derby. 

THEY adopted as their theme song that lilting 
tune from the Garrick Gaieties about the 
"girl and boy who turned Manhattan into an 
isle of joy.' ! 

They teased each other playfully, laughing 
over ridiculous jokes and phrases that had 
meaning only for them. 

They play-acted in the park, assuming char- 
acters for hours — Hank a country hick and 
Peggy a temptress from the Great White Way; 
Hank a gangster and Peggy his faithful 
moll. 

They had a limerick competition, devising 
absurd doggerel with which they regaled their 
friends. 

They ignored the past and the future and 
were light-hearted and gay, living in the 
ecstasy of the moment. Their eyes sparkled. 
Their lips were merry. And people turned for 
a second look at them and said: 

"How lovely to see a couple so radiantly 
happy!" 

So they were married. 

And then, as Peggy was pushing toward suc- 
cess so intensely while Hank met with only 
disinterested mumbles from managers, some- 
thing happened. 

No one knew just when the break came, for 
few of their friends had been told of that early 
morning elopement. 

Only a handful of intimates even knew the 
young couple were living together. 

Then one night Hank came back to Charlie 
Leatherbee's apartment, which he had shared, 
and said: 

"Peggy's going to get a divorce. Quietly, of 
course, since so' few people knew we were mar- 
ried anyway." 

And since then, Margaret has been laughing 
cynically. 

Laughing at love. Laughing at Hollywood. 

CHE doesn't believe much in either one of 
^them now. 

She found that the one didn't last in spite of 
all her dreams and plans and hopes. She 
doubts if the adoration which Hollywood has 
heaped on her will prove even as durable as the 
sentiment which led her in and out of a divorce 
court. 

Yes, Priscilla, that's her most recent photo- 
graph. 

It was taken the day she left for New York. 
She'd just seen "Only Y'esterday," which the 
press and the populace acclaimed so whole- 
heartedly. 

But to Peggy it was all so much bushwa, all 
this ballyhoo, all this bother about trying to 
make her a screen star. 

"I don't think I'll be back," she said to 
Johnny Johnston, Universal's publicity direc- 
tor who had been one of her few confidants 
during her Hollywood hegira. 

And it was Johnny who snapped this last 
picture in our album to date. 

Across the empty page which follows he has 
scribbled : 

"She'll be back, all right. That girl has 
something Hollywood wants!" 

And sure enough she is back now, playing 
the role of Bunnx in "Little Man, What 
Now?" 




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Photoplay Magazine for February, 1934 



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The Shadow Stage 

The National Guide to Motion Pictures 



(REG. U. S. PAT. OFF.) 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 59 



FRONTIER MARSHAL— Fox 

TUTERE is an unusual Western. Perhaps 
•*- -^-that's why it's so good. George O'Brien is 
great as the "dude" marshal who cleans up the 
wild and woolly town of Tombstone. The 
thrills, suspense and action are logical and con- 
vincing. You'll also like Ruth Gillette's 
"Western Mae West," and Alan Edwards' 
polished bad man. Don't let the "Western" 
tag stop you. -ee it. 

GIRL WITHOUT A ROOM— 
Paramount 

A N amusing concoction for your lighter 
■**-mood, which kids the pseudo-art racket in 
Paris. Charles Farrell, a backward Tennessee 
artist, wins a scholarship, which takes him to 
Paris to study. After a quarrel with Mar- 
guerite Churchill, the real heart interest, he 
gets involved with a Russian "baby" (Grace 
Bradley). But it all comes out right in the end 
when Charlie Ruggles brings the lovers to- 
gether again. Comedy honors go to Ruggles. 

ADVICE TO THE LOVELORN— 
20th Century-United Artists 

A S a "MissLonelyhearts" column conductor 
■**-against his will, Lee Tracy wriggles in and 
out of more mischief! But he manages to win 
Sally Blane, who disapproves of his work, in 
the end. Although Lee gives his usual spirited 
performance, he overacts a bit, which keeps 
the film beneath his standard. Isabel Jewell, 
Sterling Holloway and C. Henry Gordon han- 
dle their roles ably. 

THE WOMEN IN HIS LIFE—M-G-M 

AT 7HEN a famous lawyer, preparing to de- 
W fend a man for murder, discovers that the 
victim was the woman he loved, the situation 
becomes very complicated. However, in spite 
of being a little too melodramatic, it makes an 
exciting story that holds your interest through- 
out. Otto Kruger, as the lawyer, does a splen- 
did job in a difficult role. Una Merkel and 
Roscoe Karns are excellent comedy relief, and 
Ben Lyon provides young-love interest. 

EAST OF FIFTH AVENUE— Columbia 

A FAIR melodrama depicting life in a cheap 
New York rooming house, where ten 
people, living under the same roof, find them- 
selves hating, loving, cheating and depending 
upon each other. The entire cast is good, in- 
cluding Dorothy Tree, Mary Carlisle, Walter 
Connolly and Wallace Ford. 

SMOKY— Fox 

THE best equine epic made so far. The ab- 
sorbingly interesting saga of Will James' 
wild colt, "Smoky," the glory and the tragedy 
of his life from colthood to a pathetic junk- 
wagon nag. The gorgeous Arizona scenery 
rates second to the marvelous performance by 
Smoky himself. Victor Jcry is great as the 
tender-hearted bronco-buster. Will appeal to 
children and adults alike. 

THE THUNDERING HERD— 
Paramount 

AN exciting Zane Grey Western, with such 
old-time actors as Harry Carey, Monte 
Blue, Noah Beery and Raymond Hatton lend- 
ing a note of reality to a well-directed tale. 



About the historic rush for buffalo hides, and 
the Indian trading posts. Randolph Scott and 
Judith Allen give the film a romantic touch. 

HE COULDN'T TAKE IT— Monogram 

A COMEDY which presents the extremely 
■**■ personable Ray Walker as a ready-fisted 
process-server. He and pal George E. Stone 
mix up with gangsters for a series of embar- 
rassing complications, but Ray manages to 
rescue his sweetheart (Virginia Cherrill) from 
the toils of her oily attorney-employer. Some 
very good humor and sufficient story interest. 

AS HUSBANDS GO— Fox 

TF you're in love with your wife, don't let her 
-'-go to Paris without you. And if the man fol- 
lows her home, take him out fishing and wind 
up with a good binge. That's what Warner 
Baxter did, and it all worked out fine. Helen 
Vinson is lovely as the deluded wife. The un- 
sober scene between Warner and G. P. Hunt- 
ley, Jr. is convincing. Mediocre entertainment. 

HORSE PLAY— Universal 

TF you like Slim Summerville, you'll probably 
■*-go for this. As cowboys, he and Andy Devine 
romp through several amusing situations while 
pursuing pretty Leila Hyams. With a million 
dollars paid for his ranch because of ore de- 
posits, Slim and Andy go to England just in 
time to save Leila from jewel thieves. Fine 
supporting cast. 

HOLD THE PRESS— Columbia 

•"TIM McCOY deserts Westerns for this film 
■*- and becomes a newspaper man. As a crack 
reporter, he sets out to expose the city's cor- 
rupt parole board. He runs into a nest of rack- 
eteers who try to bump him off. But after a 
series of narrow escapes and exciting chases, 
right prevails and Tim gets his men. Shirley 
Grey plays Tim's girl friend. Good suspense. 

THE WOMAN WHO DARED— 
Wm. Berke Prod. 

CLAUDIA DELL, as president of a textile 
plant, defies racketeers who threaten bomb- 
ing. She falls for newspaper reporter Monroe 
Owsley, assigned to cover the story. Together 
they outwit the gangsters. Story is just fair. 
Entire cast good. 

EASY MILLIONS— Freuler Film 

ONE little white lie and "Skeets" Gallagher 
finds himself wading far out in deep and 
troubled waters that get deeper by the minute. 
Engaged to three girls at one time, broke and 
despondent, he finally emerges from his sea of 
trouble and all is well. Johnny Arthur, as the 
professorish roommate, is fun. Bert Roach, 
Noah Beery and Dorothy Burgess add to the 
mix-up. Amusing and sophisticated. 

HER SPLENDID FOLLY— 
Hollywood Pictures 

A FAIRLY good idea gone wrong and pro- 
duced shabbily must relegate this to the 
stay-away list. Lilian Bond plays a perfect 
double for a movie star whose accidental death 
forces her to play star to protect producer 
Alexander Carr's film investment. This results 
in trouble for everybody, but you really won't 
care. Poor photography and general ama- 
teurish treatment. 



Photoplay Magazine for February, 1934 



BIG TIME OR BUST— Tower Prod. 

REGIS TOOMEY, as the small time hus- 
band with the big time wife, and Walter 
Byron, as the insidious millionaire whose de- 
signs are well under control, do the best they 
can in a story with a well-worn plot. However, 
there's a singing voice in the film that will make 
you forget the annoying manner in which the 
menace fails to materialize. 

EAT 'EM ALIVE— Real Life Pictures 

PLENTY of grim thrills in this nature drama 
which is mostly about snakes and gila mon- 
sters in mortal combat, with the white pelicans 
of Death Valley providing comedy relief. Al- 
though elevating in the particular subject, it 
may prove too strong for women and children. 
Excellent photography. 

THE BIG SHAKEDOWN— 
First National 

GLORIFYING the corner drug store seems 
to be the mission of this uninteresting pic- 
ture. Ex-beer baron Ricardo Cortez forces pill- 
roller Charlie Farrell into faking drugs for his 
new cut-rate racket. But the fake dope kills 
Charlie's baby, and he retaliates by dropping 
Ricardo into a vat of acid. Everybody tries 
hard, but the story doesn't ring true. Bette 
Davis is Charlie's wife. 

WINE, WOMEN AND SONG— 
Monogram 

T\ 7HICH tells, with no new slants, of the 
** love of a mother, Lilyan Tashman, for her 
daughter, Marjorie Moore. Lilyan, a burlesque 
queen, initiates her daughter, fresh from a con- 
vent, into the show business. The girl falls in 
love with Matty Kemp, dance director, at the 
same time becoming prey to Lew Cody, power- 
ful operator. Lilyan finally poisons herself and 
Lew to insure Marjorie's happiness. 

FAREWELL TO LOVE— 
Associated Sound Film 

'T'HIS picture has but two things to recom- 
■*- mend it: the excellent singing of the Polish 
tenor, Jan Kiepura, and the pictorial beauty of 
the scenes in Italy. Heather Angel, as an 
Italian peasant, does her best with a colorless 
role. The film will please only music lovers who 
enjoy hearing Italian opera airs. 



The Power Behind the 
Hepburn Throne 

[ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 31 ] 



success of the exotic actress, in back of the 
madcap, prankish personality she had pre- 
sented to the film colony — had stood a shrewd 
show-woman, counselling the red-headed 
eccentric at every turn, inventing fresh ways of 
drawing attention to her, advising her at each 
step along the treacherous road to stardom. 

Laura Harding is the name of the mild-man- 
nered miss who has acted as the secret stage 
manager of Katharine Hepburn's triumphs, 
and if Hollywood has come to regard the 
actress as a woman of mystery, even less is 
* generally known about this Manhattan social- 
ite who, it now transpires, has played such an 
important part in guiding her friend's career. 

Daughter of J. Horace Harding, chairman of 
the board of the American Railway Express 
Company and the senior partner in the banking 
firm of Charles D. Barney and Company, 
Laura Harding became interested in the 
theater soon after her debut. She understudied 
Lynn Fontanne for six months in "Elizabeth 
the Queen," had a small part in "Thunder in 



I07 



said .O * • 

oylvia 

to Sidney Fox 




Sylvia of Hollywood 

World's foremost authority on 
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Hear SYLVIA in person — telling stories of Hollywood, giving 
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""VT'OU can't be really lovely when you're 
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Well — let me send you, absolutely FREE, my Per- 
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"If you honestly want to be lovelier, do two things for 
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Your grocer has Ry-Krisp Wafers in red 
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Sidney Fox, 

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WT 00 OUR PAST 



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Photoplay Magazine for February, 1934 



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the Air," and then left the stage for a season to 
coach with Frances Robinson-Duff, New 
York's best known dramatic and voice tutor. 

It was in this teacher's studio that Laura 
met Katharine Hepburn, then struggling 
rather vainly for Broadway recognition, and a 
bright friendship was begun which carried 
Laura' to Hollywood as mentor and manager. 

For it is now believed by those who know 
them best that Katharine Hepburn's chief 
reason for accepting a movie bid was to achieve 
an acclaim that would rebound to Broadway 
and insure a theatrical triumph. Fascinated as 
she may be by pictures, it is the stage which is 
the chief interest in Hepburn's life, and it was 
Laura Harding's vision which suggested that 
fame in Hollywood would bring fortune on 
Broadway. 

TT was during the run of "The Warrior's 
■^-Husband," in which Katharine Hepburn first 
won favor on the stage, that Laura Harding 
definitely abandoned her own stage ambitions 
to devote her attention to skyrocketing Kate. 
And in the offer of an RKO-Radio contract, 
which followed Hepburn's hit in "The War- 
rior's Husband," the two girls saw their chance 
to campaign for glory. 

For it has been a campaign. 

From the first day the pair stepped off the 
train in Hollywood, hired a swanky Hispano- 
Suiza and started the town talking about their 
costumes and customs, Laura Harding has 
been in a large measure responsible for the 
breath-taking build-up Katharine Hepburn has 
enjoyed. 

She has passed on the proofs of all publicity 
pictures. 

She has suggested the stunts which have 
made Hepburn "copy." 

She has helped design the costumes which 
have given the actress such glamour in her 
pictures. 

She has sat in on story conferences, studio 
bickers and been a constant companion and 
coach in the long hours of rehearsals before 
each production. 

Best of all, Laura Harding has served to 
bring Katharine's own well-bred background 
into the superficial atmosphere of the movie 
town. 

Katharine Hepburn would never have "gone 
Hollywood" in any event, but the sane balance 
of Laura Harding's friendship has helped her 
maintain the stunning individuality she 
brought West. 

Particularly has Laura Harding's inherent 
business sense aided her friend. 

The writer spent the afternoon with them 
the day Kate signed two contracts that were 
extremely important to her picture career. One 
was with the studio, the other with her agent. 

In both cases, Laura supplied the business 
acumen and Kate the fiery eloquence which 
combined to win for the budding star every 
disputed point. 

As a matter of fact, Katharine Hepburn's 
contract with RKO-Radio was almost cut 
short at the conclusion of her very first film, 
"A Bill of Divorcement," in which she sky- 
rocketted so suddenly to screen fame. 

KATE was leaving that night for a quick trip 
to Vienna. In a few hours she would be flying 
back to New York and at the moment she was 
waiting for the studio to make out her final 
check. 

There had been some argument as to the 
exact amount, and Katharine and Laura retired 
from the treasurer's office for a cigarette and a 
confab in the sun. 

Their sleek Hispano-Suiza was parked just 
under the window of David O. Selznick, then 
production boss of RKO-Radio Pictures. I 
saw Laura glance up at the open window and 
nudge Kate. 

The actress' eye followed her companion's 
and she gave an understanding chuckle. 

Suddenly, the quiet of the summer afternoon 
was rent with a shriek. 

"I don't give a good so-and-so. I'm not 
going to let them get away with it. I worked 



an extra quarter of a day and I want that 
quarter day's check. 

"I don't care what fifteen lawyers or seven- 
teen accountants say. I'm not so crazy to stay 
in pictures anyway." 

With a wink at Laura, answered by an en- 
couraging smile, Kate climbed up on the 
tonneau of the car, edging nearer to the open 
window. 

"And if I don't get that quarter day's check 
they can tear up their piffling contract and let 
the bits blow straight to the devil!" 

The girl's throaty voice, pitched to an eager 
excited note, could be heard all over the quad- 
rangle of the front lot. There was a stir behind 
Selznick's window curtains and a moment 
later the telephone in the treasurer's office 
rang. 

Kate and Laura exchanged knowing looks, 
finished their cigarettes and reentered the 
building. 

When they came out a few minutes later, 
they were beaming. 

"Did you get it?" I asked. 

"Don't be silly," cried Hepburn. "Of 
course we did!" 

Just as she had given moral support to the 
star in her wrangles with studio executives over 
stories, costumes, casts and contractural differ- 
ences, so Laura has shared with Kate her two 
most thrilling experiences in Hollywood. 

"DOTH adventures came dangerously near 
■'-'being tragic. The first was a wild midnight 
cruise in a coast fog in which they were lost for 
eight hours. The second was a narrow escape 
from attack at the hands of hoodlums. 

It was their first winter in California that 
Kate and Laura accepted an invitation from 
Christian Rub, then touring with the road 
company of " Grand Hotel," to join a yachting 
party. 

With Rub and another man, the girls 
motored down to Long Beach and boarded a 
small boat. The four amateur sailors had 
crossed to Catalina and were on their way 
home when a terrific gale came up and blew 
them off their course and out to sea. 

"Night fell before we could get straight on 
our course," Laura recalls, "and shortly after- 
wards a dense fog added to our predicament. 

"Soon we had completely lost our bearings. 
None of us knew much about sailing and for 
eight hours we drifted in the darkness, soaking 
wet, chilled to the bone and all of us fearful 
that we would never come out of it alive. 

"Finally about four o'clock in the morning 
we saw a necklace of lights ahead of us, shining 
faintly through the mist. We pulled down the 
sail and slowly sculled our way toward the 
lights, wondering where we were, what port we 
were nearing. 

" When we finally reached shore we found we 
were at the very dock in Long Beach from 
which we had set sail!" 

It was Katharine's tomboy zest for the ad- 
venturous which nearly proved disastrous again 
a few weeks before she left for New York this 
last time. With Laura, Katharine decided one 
afternoon to explore a particularly wild canyon 
in back of their home at Beverly Hills. 



TTHE girls, dressed in short walking skirts, 
•*- were climbing one of the ridges of the canyon 
when two shots were fired in the gulley below 
them and two bullets cut the underbrush a few 
feet away from them. 

"Watch where you're firing!" shouted Kath- 
arine and turned to see three men running up 
the side of the hill toward the girls. 

"That was just to show you we were here, to 
stop you so we could get acquainted," guffawed 
one of the men. 

The girls took to their heels, but for several 
hundred yards were in plain sight of the 
tramps, who kept firing after them. 

"The bullets kept coming within a few feet 
of us and I thought we'd be hit any moment," 
recounted Laura, "but I have never seen any- 
one so courageous as Kate. Finally after 
reaching the top of the ridge we circled a mile 
or two and got back home safely." 



Photoplay Magazine for February, 1934 



A single policeman, sent out to investigate 
when the girls reported the incident, was 
routed by the vagrants and when he returned 
with aid they had gone. 

When Katharine Hepburn left for New York 
and rehearsals in the new Jed Harris stage pro- 
duction, "The Lake," Laura remained in 



Hollywood to oversee the closing of their house, 
pack up odds and ends and attend to a dozen 
last minute matters. 

But Laura followed almost immediately, and 
there is little doubt that while Katharine Hep- 
burn works to perfect her lines, Laura Harding 
is near at hand — coaching, suggesting, helping. 



Back of the West Front 



[ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 60 



and the recent "I'm No Angel," has no degree 
from a college. In fact, she never even saw a 
high school diploma. But she has a highly 
developed instinct for the theater. She has 
something more valuable to the artist than a 
university education — real knowledge of life 
and human understanding. 

These are the attributes which will keep the 
Mae West hysteria at a high pitch long after 
the public has forgotten that curves are desir- 
able and long after her title, "Queen of Sex," 
has been shelved for one of greater dignity. 
I can see Miss West playing Madame Sans Gene 
and Nell Gwyn. Both of these historically 
famous ladies have been portrayed in the 
theater by actresses of the highest rank, but 
under the West banner I believe they would 
receive an individual touch which would stamp 
Mae as an artist of standing. 

HOWEVER, during all these years that I've 
been following the West career, I've learned 
other things than what one observes before the 
footlights. A great deal of the lady's character 
make-up. And that is comprised of a very 
complex, puzzling group of traits. 

Her press-agents have been presenting the 
star with a "Diamond Lil" frontage and a 
lily-white background. Which is — and is not 
— quite true. 

Born in Greenpoint, the Bowery section of 
Brooklyn, of a father who earned his living 
from the prize-fighter's ring, she was cast on 
her own at an age when most girls are still 
sheltered by their parents' wings. And what 
she saw of life she has interpreted on stage and 
screen. 

Before that 1912 engagement as a single in 
vaudeville, Mae West had been a child actress, 
then a chorus girl in a burlesque show, the 
heavy in an acrobatic act, and a featured 
player in a Ziegfeld show. Quite a while before 
Gilda Gray claimed the shimmy as a dance of 
her origination, Mae West had introduced it 
into her vaudeville act as the "she-waddle." 

Mae West is like the Royal Mounted Police 
— she always gets her man. In her pictures 
I believe we find her so amusing because she 
does the things we women would like to do — 
but do not dare! Just as in every man there 
is a bit of the feminine, so in every woman 
tuere is a bit of the masculine. Man is sup- 
posed to be the hunter — the one who does the 
chasing, but every woman at times would like 
to have a hand in running game to cover. 
Tradition, conventions of polite society, de- 
mand that woman sit back and wait for the 
man to make the approach. And every 
woman sitting in her audience also would like 
to say to the man who apppeals to her, "You 
can be had," and then go after him. And 
despite all the philosophy to the contrary, and 
because of the physical evidence from the real 
stag draw which Mae West's pictures win, 
the men are not altogether averse to a little 
cooperation from the female in courtship. 

TN an interview, before her name was well- 
-*-known even along the Broadway Rialto and 
long before Hollywood embraced her, she said 
to me, "I think I'll go to Paris and get myself 
a king — they can be had." Of course, Mae 
was only joking when she said that. But I 
believe that if Mae really did want a king, he 
wouldn't have a chance. 
It is characteristic of Mae to wisecrack a 



tragic or sentimental situation. In explaining 
how she gets some of her unmoral characters 
of the screen past the censors, she said to me, 
"I always use gags and wisecracks to get away 
from the sentimental. You get a laugh out of 
the audience and they forget to be sympa- 
thetic. F'rinstance," she exemplified, "I'm a 
dame tryin' to steal another woman's hus- 
band, and she comes to me weepin' and 
remonstratin' and I says to her, 'Aw, go on! 
You've had him long enough!' " 

T LAUGHED and she turned triumphantly. 
-*■" You see, I get a laugh and then where's all 
the tragedy? It's just a gag." 

Another highlight of the star's personality 
is her generosity and loyalty. The Clarence 
Morgenstern who booked her in the Family 
Theater in her obscure days was the man she 
sought to produce her play, " Sex," which ran 
for ten months on upper Broadway. After, 
the play was banned by the censors, and for 
the production Miss West and her business 
associates found themselves in the toils of the 
law. Morgenstern deserted the West produc- 
tions for plays less likely to stir the ire of the 
law, but, alas, they proved to be less lucrative. 

When the glittering marquee over the Para- 
mount Theater on Broadway announced in 
electric letters four feet high: "Mae West on 
Stage and Screen," the pedestrian traffic before 
that theater became a tangled snarl of West 
admirers. You might have thought that the 
theater was giving away gold bricks to alleviate 
the depression — but it was only a city gone 
mad over a new face in the cinema. 

In the midst of this adulation, physically 
weary from the strain of four personal appear- 
ances a day, Mae did not forget that friend of 
her early career. "What's become of Morgy?" 
she asked. No one knew where he could be 
found. He no longer had an office in the 
theatrical belt. The depression had eliminated 
him as a Broadway producer. But Mae knew 
where he lived. The humble home in City 
Island, a suburb of New York, had no tele- 
phone. So one night after her last perform- 
ance, she pressed through the waiting throng 
of admirers, denying eager reporters an audi- 
ence, and stepping into her car directed the 
chauffeur to drive to City Island. 

TT was through Mae's generosity that 
-'-Morgenstern made a comeback to his old 
haunts. 

Mr. Morgenstern, in speaking of this epi- 
sode, told me that no matter how much Mae 
earns — she passes it out to those less fortunate. 
Her Broadway production of "Diamond Lil" 
netted her almost half a million dollars in 
royalties and in salary, but due to her large 
gifts and loans to friends, at the end of the run 
she was broke. So much so, that she accepted 
a comparatively small sum for her role in 
"Night After Night." 

Clarence Morgenstern related to me another 
incident which is indicative of the actress's 
loyalty. During the run of "Sex," he found 
it necessary to discharge an electrician of the 
play's crew. Mae, on hearing of the man's dis- 
missal, would not go on unless the man was 
reinstated. And she held the curtain fifteen 
minutes until her demands were met. 

Harold Spielberg, the lawyer who defended 
her during her trial for participation in the 
censored play, "Sex," said that her chief con- 



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cern during the ordeal of the trial was not for 
herself but for her cast. Barry O'Neill, the 
leading man of the play, is an Englishman of 
good family background. Spielberg, in speak- 
ing of this, said Miss West pleaded with him, 
"Get Barry out of this — I don't care what 
happens to me." 

O'Neill and the other members of the cast 
who were on trial escaped a jail sentence 
through Mae's efforts. And even when she 
was behind prison bars — for a brief time — she 
did not spend her time in self-pity, but was 
solicitous of the welfare of her fellow prisoners. 
The only time she sent for her lawyer during 
the serving of this unjust sentence was when 
she paid him to defend a young mother who 



was waiting trial on a petty larceny charge. 
Not only did she pay attorney's fees for the 
woman, but she saw that her family were 
provided for during her imprisonment. 

Someone has said that no charm is lasting 
unless one is considerate and kind to other 
people — for charm is a spiritual quality that 
radiates itself through a physical medium. 
"Spiritual and charming" may seem strange 
adjectives to apply to the Diamond Lil of 
stage and screen, but when you analyze Mae 
West's character, they fit the "Queen of Sex" 
like the proverbial glove — for she is kind and 
considerate, even though she attempts to wise- 
crack you out of thinking she is sentimental 
and sympathetic. 



Two "Toughs" from the Chorus 

[ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 69 ] 



our theater and got the job vacant in our 
company. I taught him the dance steps we 
were doing. 

"Would you believe it that he's a limber 
son-of-a-gun? He doesn't unbend much in 
pictures, but how he can stretch those long 
legs of his! Has slack ligaments, or something. 
He could do splits at the crack of a drum- 
stick." 

Jimmy says he envied this double-jointed- 
ness of Allen because he was muscle-bound 
himself. They got an apartment with two 
other men in the chorus for the remaining two 
weeks of the Boston run. 

"We were financially sad," Jimmy explains. 
Their salary was thirty dollars a week, but 
they had to send practically all of that back 
to New York to cover debts. One day the 
now-noted pair were down to fifteen cents. 
They flung it down at a one-arm lunch stand 
for coffee and a doughnut. 

"That was the day Jimmy saw a beautiful 
girl, who was also in the 'Pitter Patter' 
chorus, pass by," Allen tattle-tales. "He said 
to me, 'Gee, I'm crazy about that kid!'" 
Her name was Billie Vernon and she became 
Jimmy's missus. 

"Well," snorts Mr. Cagney, "I recollect 
a stunning gal in that show whom Allen kind 
of craved. One night she stopped him back- 
stage, and gave him to understand that he 
could come up any time. He was so scared 
at her audacity that he ran whenever he 
thought she was about to speak to him!" 

When the theater was deserted, in the day- 



time, Jimmy used to go in and practice 
dancing by himself. The intricate effects were 
a natural for Allen, but not for the red-head. 
Eventually, however, Jimmy turned into the 
better prancer of the two. When the show 
closed in New York, where they went after 
Boston, he was rewarded with a specialty 
dance solo on the lengthy road tour. 

Both of them express amazement at finding 
themselves actors. 

Jenkins' parents were well-known theatrical 
people, having headlined in musicals, but the 
senior Cagneys were total strangers to the 
smell of grease-paint. Jimmy's papa ran a 
saloon on the East Side. 

"I trouped as a kid with my folks," Allen 
said to me, "and I loathed the stage. I 
wanted to be a marine engineer. Studied 
along that line for two years, and worked in a 
ship yard for a year and a half for practical 
experience. 

"Then, like lightning, at nineteen I got the 
acting bug. The quickest way onto a stage 
seemed to be the chorus. My folks didn't 
think much of me for debuting that way. 
Two years of it convinced me I wasn't pro- 
gressing, so I went to the American Academy 
of Dramatic Arts in New York, where my 
father had once been an instructor." 

Graduating from the school which has 
trained many of our finest performers, his 
first regular job was a bit in the Broadway 
production of "Secrets." A succession of 
good parts in outstanding dramas followed. 
When Warners decided to film "Blessed 



1 J f ^' 


IF 


' * f — • 





And don't drop any stitches! There's nothing like a crochet needle for 
keeping girls contented on the set. These four, who worked with Paul Muni 
in his latest, "Hi, Nelile," made good use of their time between scenes 



Photoplay Magazine for February, 1934 



III 



Event," they imported Allen to recreate his 
original role in it. 

Jimmy's luck was slower in arriving. When 
"Pitter Patter" ended, he and Billie Vernon, 
who'd murmured "I do," tackled vaudeville. 
They made precarious sums varying from 
$12.50 a week up, during the five years they 
toured the tank towns. Jimmy finally scored 
as a roughneck in a New York play, and thus 
found his forte. Three years ago Warners 
bought "Penny Arcade," in w-hich Jimmy 
and Joan Blondell were playing, and brought 
them to Hollywood to do it on celluloid. 

The only argument these two regulars have 
ever had was over a shirt. That was when the 
chorus wardrobe chief sang out, "There's one 
size fifteen left!" Both made a dive for the 
clean shirt. A knock-down, drag-out scrap, 
friendly-like, ensued, ending by Cagney 
tossing Jenkins into the farthest corner of 
their dressing-room. "I guess that was due to 
his constant smoking," Jimmy expounds. "I 
never puffed." 

A SIDE from performing, Jimmy was "dress- 
■* *-er" to the star. It was his duty to be com- 
pletely responsible for that gentleman's attire 
and he came to feel like a one-man cleaning 
establishment. 

Cagney and Jenkins remained friends, al- 
though they never worked together again until 
Warners cast them in the same pictures. 
And each swears that the other has been 
unaffected by Hollywood. 

"Jimmy's still a great guy," Allen pro- 
fesses. "Maybe he's mellowed a trifle, but 
he hasn't acquired the usual stellar swell-head. 
He always enjoyed fine music and loved to 
read. Now he can go to all the concerts he 
wants and buy books by the dozens." Not 
being addicted to Beverly society, Jimmy and 
his Billie have plenty of time for these quiet 
forms of recreation. 

"The chances are a hundred-to-one against 
a successful Hollywood marriage," AUen con- 
tended with the cynical expression on his face 
of the show-me bachelor. "The trouble is 
that people who've never had big money are 
showered with it. They go wild. Or meet a 
third party who's anxious to chisel in." 

And yet shortly after making this statement, 
Allen stepped happily to the altar with Mary 
Landee. So, after all, he followed the example 
of the Cagneys happy union. 

The Cagney-Jenkins' mutual hobby is 
boating. Every summer when Jimmy came 
into New York from a season on the road, 
they used to hang around the shipyards, 
examining the latest models. They frequently 
chugged up the Hudson in Allen's outboard 
motorboat, taking a tent along and camping 
overnight. 

In disposition these two toughs from the 
chorus are very different. Jimmy, in spite of 
his red hair, is ready to make friends with 
everybody and is generally easy-going. Allen 
is aloof and has few intimates. 

"My likes and dislikes are so extreme," he 
analyzes, "whereas Jimmy is tactful and can 
be 'middling.' He is studious, and a little 
light fiction is the extent of my reading." 

Nevertheless, of the two, Allen's prepara- 
tion for drama was much more thorough, 
thanks to his training at the dramatic acad- 
emy. Hard knocks taught Jimmy. 

"AND they're silly," Jimmy insists, "to 
■* *-keep Jenkins in mug parts. Why, I saw 
him do a dressed-up role on the stage. He wore 
a tailor-made suit, sported a mustache, and he 
was as dapper as could be!" Loyally, Cagney 
argues with the studio executives not to push 
his pal into a rut. 

It's a long way from that tiny dressing- 
room four flights up in the back-stage loft, 
which they shared in Boston, to their present 
fame and fortune. Jimmy cashed in on his 
memories when he was called upon to portray 
the dance director in "Footlight Parade." 
As for Jenkins, the only thing which might be 
a tip-off to his chorus past is a sartorial habit. 
He prefers berets to hats. 




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Pavlova's Experience 

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Photoplay Magazine for February, 1934 



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Sylvia Gives Clara Bow Some Timely Advice 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 35 



grand! Now stiffen the knees and pull yourself 
forward — with your arms still straight out — 
until your head is touching your knees. If 
you're stiff you've got to work and work hard 
until you can do it. But all the time keep your 
body relaxed. And all the time keep thinking 
about that bump. While your head is on your 
knees make your shoulder-blades squeeze the 
bump. Now roll back, rolling all the way along 
the spine and touch your toes over your head 
with almost the entire weight of the body rest- 
ing on the bump. Why, you can just feel that 
bump smashing off! My, it's great. Start out 
by doing this roll back and forth ten times a day 
and then work up to twenty! You've got to do 
it, Clara, and, incidentally, it's good for the 
entire figure. It's a good exercise for the dia- 
phragm, for the hips, the legs, for the upper 
arms and round shoulders. It will also 
strengthen the spine and help you to hold 
yourself straight. 

To tell you the truth, Clara, I was amazed 
that you were so plump when I saw you do 
that zippy hip-swinging dance in "Hoopla." 
Darling, that was hot. But while the audience 
was admiring it for its hotness, I was thinking 
what a great reducing exercise it was. So keep 
it up even when there aren't any cameras 
around. Swing the fat off, Clara, and I don't 
think Rex Bell will mind being an audience of 
one when you take that exercise. 

And that brings me to a point I've been 
wanting to make to all you picture girls. I 
know what you do. You absolutely forget 
about your figures between pictures. And 
don't begin your exercises and diets until just a 
couple of days before you start a picture. You 
know how college students "cram" for an 
examination? Well, that's what you girls do 
before you start work. You "cram" your 
reducing. What you've got to do is to take 
the proper exercises and diets whether you're 
working or not. Get the habit of exercise. 



Do it every day. Then it will come easy. Just 
you see! 

Clara, you're a serious artiste now. Out in 
Hollywood when you're working you don't let 
people come on your set to stare at you. You 
take yourself seriously. And I'm for you, 
darling. I'm serious, too, and I want to see 
your figure and your face measure up to your 
acting. I want you to take this advice in the 
spirit in which it is written — a very sincere 
spirit. 

I could have written this to you and sent it 
to you through the mail marked "strictly per- 
sonal," but I want other girls who have your 
problems to have the benefit of it, too. And if 
you don't believe I'm giving you the right dope 
just ask those other girls who read my articles. 
They know it can be done. They face their 
figure problems just as you must. It's im- 
portant, Clara. Now hop to it. First take 
off the excess plumpness on your face. While 
you're doing that, get to work on that bump 
on the back of your spine, and the exercise I've 
given you for that will take down your figure 
generally. 

Oh yes, and just one more thing. I know you 
love to ride horseback. I know that it's grand 
to go galloping all over the country with Rex 
when you're on the ranch. But don't do too 
much horseback riding. It spreads the hips, 
darling. 

Okay, Clara, I'm signing off now. And I 
hope the next time I see you on the screen 
you'll look as beautiful as I know you can look. 
Remember, I'll have my eagle eye on you. 
You're a great kid. 

I like you, and I know you've got sense 
enough to realize that everything I've told you 
is for your own good. 

Love and good luck, and goodbye to those 
extra pounds. 

Your friend, 

Sylvia. 



Answers by Sylvia 



TROUBLES, bothers, worries— 
what a joy it is, girls, to be able 
to help! You see here the kind of help- 
ful advice Aunt Sylvia gives others. 
If you want help, simply write Sylvia, 
care of PHOTOPLAY Magazine, 221 
West 57th Street, New York City, en- 
closing a stamped, self-addressed en- 
velope. No obligation — glad I can be 
of assistance. 

SYLVIA 

Dear Sylvia: 

I do admire a long, narrow face so much but 
my face is round and I hate it. Is there any- 
thing I can do for it? I know you've often 
said that you can't change the bone formation, 
but maybe there is something else I could do? 
G. H., Fort Worth, Texas 

Well, can you beat it? I'm glad your letter 
came this month. Because my article in this 
issue is advice to Clara Bow about just that 
very thing. Read it and take it to heart. I 
knew I was right in telling Clara what to do 
publicly instead of privately. When you are 
reading this article, Clara will be reading it, 
too. Both of you must do what I say. You'll 
both be rewarded. 

My dear Madame Sylvia: 

I have been afraid to squeeze off the flesh 
as you recommend because my husband tells 
me it will make my flesh flabby. Is that true? 
Mrs. F. F. W., New Orleans, La. 



How can the flesh be flabby when there 
isn't any flesh there, darling? Seriously, you 
mustn't fear anything like that. If you 
squeeze off the fat as I tell you, you won't be 
flabby because you work on the muscles. 
You do not stretch the skin. You work from 
underneath, dipping under the skin to get at 
those fat cells and the muscles. I've never 
had any complaints about flabbiness — and I've 
been handing out advice for a long, long time. 

My dear Madame Sylvia: 

I am nervous and someone told me that it 
would make me sleep better and feel better if 
I took very hot baths before I went to bed 
at night. I've been doing that for months, 
but I seem to feel so pepless. 

B. D., Jacksonville, Fla. 

Well, if you want to kill yourself, keep on 
taking hot baths. And I wish people who give 
out advice when they don't know what they're 
talking about would take a jump in the lake! 
Stop the hot baths at once! Take a cool 
shower in the morning. Rub your spine 
briskly with a Turkish towel for twenty 
minutes. To sleep well work at the back of 
your neck with your hands until the muscles 
there are all relaxed. Then work on your 
spine. Then, with two fingers, work in a small 
circle in a rotary movement just at the corner 
of each eye. That will put you to sleep. 
Hot baths sap all your energy. No wonder 
you don't have any pep. 



Photoplay Magazine for February, 1934 



Undraping Hollywood 

[ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 29 ] 

"She Done Him Wrong" has had on hips, 
bosoms, and millinery. Remember Garbo's 
pill-box hat. We thought it was hideous. But 
we wore it — and liked it! 

The various fashion creators and designers in 
Hollywood studios all agree on one point: 
that the effect of seeing so many undressed 
girls on the screen will be psychological. The 
eye gradually becomes accustomed to the un- 
draped feminine body, and there is no shock left. 

'"PHE immediate result, according to Travis 
■^ Banton, designer for Paramount stars, has 
been a desire for contrast. 

"This winter, women have been covered up 
as never before. Muffled about the neck, 
draped in long, intricate sleeves and trailing 
skirts. The only area left exposed has been the 
back. This has been due to a conclusion that 
a woman does not have to show all her anatomy 
to be alluring. 

"But fashions will swing around, this spring 
and summer, to the very low front, exposing the 
swelling bosom — due to the Mae West in- 
fluence. (Banton designed the West cos- 
tumes.) The extreme uncovering they have 
seen so frequently on the screen has made all 
women body — and leg — conscious. They will 
take better care of their bodies, as more and 
more of them are exposed. We will have 
transparencies at the hem and above return- 
ing, and the long Directoire split up the side of 
the sheath skirt, as far as the knee, or farther. 

" Women of fashion will never copy chorus 
girls — but the influence of the theatrical cos- 
tume will be felt more than ever, but modified. 
Already we have glitter in the daytime, which 
has heretofore been regarded as extreme, and 
we have the feeling of ornament. 

"The new Dietrich costumes in 'Catherine 
the Great,' in which she is incredibly beautiful, 
will emphasize more than ever the importance 
of shoulders and bust. Her gowns are brought 
way down in the front to the lowest possible 
degree, clearly showing the deep line between 
the breasts. The back is also very low. Women 
in the audience, seeing how exquisitely beauti- 
ful and feminine she looks, cannot help being 
influenced in their own clothes." 

Adrian, at M-G-M, sees it this way: "Mu- 
sicals with undressed girls will certainly bring 
about a terrific reaction toward dressing up. 
They will vie with the nudist colonies in 
making clothes important, because the more 
one sees of the dancing girls, the more one' 
realizes the value of clothes in enhancing femi- 
nine charm. 

'""PHE effect on fashion will be certain, 

*■ but indirect. The swathed neckline will 
change. The new spring clothes will show 
radical and unusual collar treatment, and ex- 
tremely low decolletage for evening. 

"Already, the thrill of near-nudity in the 
chorus girl is beginning to diminish. We are 
becoming satiated. The most beautiful and 
expensive chorus number we have in 'Going 
Hollywood' is one in which the girls wear 
gorgeous medieval costumes — and on each one 
was lavished the same amount of care, time and 
expense that we ordinarily spend on a star's 
creation. We felt that after the deluge of flesh, 
the girls looked more alluring in these feminine 
costumes than when practically naked. 

"Nudity, to my mind, robs the figure of all 
imagination and real beauty." 

Orry-Kelly, at Warners, has an interesting 
theory. "No matter how far we may stray 
away," he says, "eventually we always return 
to the Greek simplicity. The Greeks loved 
their bodies and dared to show them. They 
were a race of body-worshippers. We are ap- 
proximately the same, here in Hollywood. 

"Fashion is fickle. All winter, women have 
been bundled to the chin. In three months' 
time, the pendulum will swing around to ex- 




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Photoplay Magazine for February, 1934 




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treme exposure of the breast, and more 
luxurious materials than ever. The newest 
invention of fashion is the five-o'clock-dress, 
and the most sensible. In it, a woman of 
fashion may dress for a cocktail party, dinner, 
and the theater or any event after — and be 
suitably gowned throughout the evening. Many 
of these dresses are made very decollete with a 
little formal jacket that can be removed. 
Many with no jacket will be ingeniously de- 
vised to unfasten about the neck, front and 
back, as the evening grows later. This dress 
has captured feminine fancy and will stay in 
for a long time." 

J/" ALLOCH, at Columbia, designed costumes 
■^-for the famous Ziegfeld. He says, " Clothes 
are the first indication of the reaction of a 
country. 

"We are experiencing a great relaxation 
from worry — the same thing that occurred im- 
mediately after the war, when people said, 
'Let's be gay, let's be naughty, in spite of 
everything. Look what we have been through ! ' 

"The instant response in pictures was the 
cycle of bright, happy musicals, with the laugh- 
ing, half-naked chorus girls. 

"The identical thing happened during the 
Direcloire period, which is having such a pro- 
nounced effect on current fashions. The 
ladies then not only stripped themselves to the 
most diaphanous costumes — they moistened 
their gowns with scented oil and perfume so 
they would cjing voluptuously to the body! 
Then they went out with them on, wet, and 
that accounts for the terrible epidemic of 
pneumonia that year. 

" We are doing the same — in a modern, modi- 
fied way. The move toward undressing on the 
screen will keep moving, and the fashion results 
will be felt very soon. Musicals are a symptom 
and a stimulation toward what women want to 
do — reveal more and more of the lovely bodies 
on which they are lavishing more care than ever 
before. 

" We are making a bride's dress for Claudette 
Colbert, which has dignity — but is still a little 
on the gay side. Maybe the gaiety of the 
nation is yet a little forced — for the moment 
everyone is acting, which is fun to watch. The 
repeal of prohibition has had a definite influ- 
ence on clothes, jewels and manners. On the 
depression, which we now speak of positively in 
the past tense. All these things show startlingly 
in pictures and fashions. 

"Just as the Sennett bathing beauties had 
their effect on revolutionizing the bathing-suit 
right down to the present wisp it has turned 



out to be — so musicals and all other pictures 
have their lasting 'say' in all types of clothes. 

"We recently designed a fur evening coat 
for Elissa Landi — with the whole back cut out 
to the waist! And Elissa, one of the more con- 
servative stars, wore diaphanous draperies that 
covered her exquisite body — but certainly re- 
vealed it at the same time. 

"The idea of suggesting undress has always 
been more seductive than stark nakedness. 
The naughtiest lady in pictures or any place 
else is more sex-alluring when slightly covered 
and suggesting her possibilities, than entirely 
sans raiment. There is always that piquant 
idea of wondering 'What has she?' Much 
more intriguing than 'That's all there is — 
there isn't any more!' 

"The Direcloire split up the skirt and the 
stock-collar look are returning fast. The small 
hips, long fines, general pushing-forward of 
clothes — that ' I'm-going-to-be-there' look — 
the Winged Victory, with the wind blowing the 
other way. 

"Because the motivating idea in clothes now 
is 'We must get out, get away, let's go forward 
into something better.' Witness the airplane 
dresses and that general flying-hither-and-yon 
appearance. 

"These trends will have more impetus from 
pictures than from any other medium. Every- 
thing concerns movement, the whole silhouette 
— and this is a direct result of pictures. Shine, 
color and glitter — well-dressed women are even 
wearing spangles to luncheon — very subdued 
spangles, done awfully well, of course. The 
only difference between late afternoon and 
midnight gowns is in the addition of jewels. 

"The whole idea is sheer delight — abandon 
—forced or not, it doesn't matter. It gets 
people in a light mood, lifts them out of the 
heavy, tired fog in which they have been lost. 

"TDICTURES, especially musicals, have been 
-L the first to promote this cheer-leader atti- 
tude. What could be more merry and carefree 
than a group of half -clad chorus girls, prancing 
nimbly across the screen, full of the joy of liv- 
ing? That is the mood all women want to 
approximate, these days. They can't prance 
or go half-clad — but they can convey the im- 
pression with clothes. 

"In my opinion, those who appreciate the 
value of contrast will realize that they can do 
it with a flash at an ankle, a rounded breast, or 
a hip-bone, more than they can by stripping." 
So — there you have the elaborations of four 
of the leading stylists of the world, who have 
all draped — and undraped — Hollywood. 



I Meet Miss Crawford 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 37 ] 



picture, with only hard-boiled directors and 
cameramen to look on. Then the picture goes 
out into the world — and I am left behind, never 
to hear a single round of any warm, cheering 
applause it may bring. It is as if we could 
never get closer to those we love than through 
letters. But, of course, the stage is small and 
limited, while the whole world — all of life and 
history — is within the range of the pictures." 

I asked her how far they could go — what 
heights they could reach. 

SHE threw back her lovely head and her 
voice was charged with the passion of a pro- 
phetic vision. " Oh, we've just started ! We've 
only now stumbled on the road that finally will 
lead to perfection. There is constant improve- 
ment in the mechanics of camera and sound 
equipment. Our screen plays are becoming 
finer and vastly more beautiful. Men of great 
imagination and talent, such as Thalberg, are 
more and more approaching pictures as a very 
great art. It is no longer only a place and way 
to make fabulous, fantastic sums of money — it 
is a way to create beauty and express the secrets 
of the heart. I believe that Irving Thalberg 



alone will carry far ahead the torch that will 
light the trail to a whole new conception of the 
vast possibilities of the motion picture. It is 
unlimited, inconceivable in its promises." 

These cold, black words on white paper fail 
completely to paint the fire of sincerity and en- 
thusiasm that flamed in her eyes and voice. 
" I want to be part of this great development," 
she said slowly. "I repeat, pictures are only 
beginning to show their potential greatness." 

I wanted to cheer. I believed thoroughly in 
what she was saying and I told her so. Then I 
asked her about her own future pictures. 

"My next picture is to be 'Pretty Sadie 
McKee' — and I'm ready for my big chance. 
I'd like to do ' The Merry Widow' with Maurice 
Chevalier, with Irving Thalberg to supervise it. " 

"But I had no idea you could sing." 

She smiled. " Neither did anyone else. You 
see, I've been taking vocal lessons, just for 
some such chance." 

That, I imagine, is what many people would 
call a "break." But I don't call it that at all. 
I call it fishing for, rather than waiting for, an 
opportunity. This slender, talented young per- 
son was not content to be merely a very sue- 



Photoplay Magazine for February, 1934 



cessful motion picture star who could play 
glamorous parts: she insisted on preparing her- 
self so that she could do immortal parts. 

It is a restless, boundless ambition that 
fairly consumes her. 

She is eager and determined to plumb the 
depths of knowledge — to learn anything and 
everything. 

"Oh, I'd like to have time to read all the 
dictionaries and encyclopedias in the world," 
she went on breathlessly. "I'm never so happy 
as when I'm sitting on the floor with a dozen 
big volumes piled around me. You see, I start 
to look up one thing and before I finish a para- 
graph I find a reference to something else I 
don't understand, and then I have to look that 
up — and so it goes until I'm buried alive in 
books. And I love it." 

THEN it was that she spoke of young Doug 
and their shattered romance. I don't know 
this attractive lad, but I wish that he might 
have heard just what she said about him. I 
fancy that I'm fairly case-hardened, but it was 
brave and beautiful. 

"You see, he was wonderfully educated," 
she explained, "and he'd use big words, and I'd 
embarrass him terribly when I'd stop him even 
when there were a lot of people around and ask 
him what so-and-so meant. I wouldn't know 
how to spell it even if I could have remembered 
it, so I couldn't just wait and look it up in the 
dictionary when I'd get home. So I'd just ask 
him straight out. Poor Doug! He is a fine 
person, and we had many happy hours to- 
gether. 

" But, you see, he could never quite get over 
his two heroes — his distinguished father and 
Jack Barrymore. He thought he was himself, 
but for a long time he really was the shadow 
of those two great actors. 

"I suppose it just wasn't in the cards for us to 
make it go. At first I could not help but be 
bitter and resentful, but I'm not any more. 
We learn a lot from the blows that life gives us. 
In a way, they're infinitely more important to 
us than the gestures of success that may fall 
our way." 

It was strange to hear such ripe words of 
philosophy from this extraordinary young 
woman. 

"They made me want to know more about 
her, so I asked her quite bluntly to tell of her- 
self, what she wanted, how she viewed life. 

"I want to read a great deal," she began. 
"You see, I had such a pitifully little education 
and now I have to work hard to make up for it. 
Why, do you know I had never read 'Alice in 
Wonderland' until the other day on the train 
coming East. 

"And there are thousands of books that I 
want to catch up with. 

"What a sweet and wonderful thing life is," 
she said excitedly. "I remember a line I saw 
in a newspaper the other day — ' Some people 
are so afraid to die that they never begin to 
life.' 

"And I want to live — I want to know every- 
thing and see everything. I want to travel 
and be happy all my life. I want to touch the 
stars." 

A TELEPHONE rang. I had overstayed 
■**■ my time. I rose to go. 

"I'd like to talk hours with you," she was 
kind enough to say. "Won't you come back 
before I start for the West?" 

But I was on my way to Washington. I 
would not be back until after she had left. I 
said goodbye — and it was like saying goodbye 
and bon voyage to an old friend. 

And as I walked down the hall toward the 
elevator, and in fact the whole evening 
through, I felt as I said at the beginning of this 
little piece, "jes' good." I had been with a 
completely happy person. Life to her was full 
and beautiful. She had risen out of the ashes 
and dust; she had found a new world that was 
fair and lovely. 

I don't know much about motion pictures, 
but I know a little about human beings — and 
~)oan Crawford is a swell human being. 



^sfjT^ 



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Photoplay Magazine for February, 1934 




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The Passing Show of '33 



contixtjTed from page 51 



Please mention PHOTOPLAY MAGAZINE 
when answering advertisements 



and twenty-two man-eating lions. He cracks 
a tomato-colored whip and the animals roll 
over — dead. They just had a glimpse of 
Cecil's riding breeches with puttees. Will 
Rogers drags on a huge hog called " Blue Boy." 
Clyde Beatty gets intimate with a couple 
dozen lions and tigers for Universal's "The 
Big Cage," Paramount gets hysterical with 
"King of the Jungle," and Fox shoots the 
works in "Zoo in Budapest." Starving actors 
in stolen bearskin rugs get work for the first 
time in years. 

The spotlight is suddenly swung to a tweed- 
clad figure who waves a gloved hand at re- 
porters, who are too stunned to wave back. 

f~** ARBO, she come back, by yumpin yimminy, 
^-^just as Georgie Raft, with his three hundred 
and sixty-five suits, seventy dozen handker- 
chiefs, six jars of hair slickem and two body- 
guards, walks out of Paramount's life. Georgie 
won't be naughty in "The Story of Temple 
Drake," but Jack LaRue, with five sisters, one 
mother, two dogs and a pot of spaghetti, will. 

Constance Bennett waves a fond farewell to 
the Marquis, who sets sail for the South Seas 
to make a picture, while Cecil De Mille starts 
his famous hunt for "The Perfect Virgin." 

The whole world becomes curve conscious as 
the Mae West vogue grows. People curve in 
places they haven't curved in for years. 
Bicycles come and go, and so does Charlie 
Laughton. With a goatee. 

Warner Brothers paste tin-foil on a fast 
train and the "42nd Street Special" shuffles off 
to Buffalo. 

And now the whole company, from elec- 
tricians to star, is frozen into a silence that 
reaches throughout the land as Mary Pickford 
announces her separation from Douglas Fair- 
banks. There is grief in Mary's eyes, and all 
Hollywood bows its head at the passing of this 
great romance. 

Douglas remains in England. And Mary 
files suit for divorce. 

Lionel Barrymore comes screaming in, wear- 
ing his usual knickers and waving a dilapidated 
object. He has just found his Rasputin 
whiskers, mislaid in 1932. 

A baby epidemic sweeps the land. Actors go 
about tiptoeing so as not to wake up baby. 
The Dick Arlens get themselves a baby boy, 
but the strain proves too much for their friend, 
Bing Crosby, who takes to his bed. Then 
the Crosbys get one, and Bing takes to two 
beds somewhere down "The Old Ox Road." 

"p\E MILLE finds his " Perfect Virgin," who 
-'—^proves to be only the wife of a famous 
wrestler. Al Jolson pokes Walter W'inchell in 
the neck at the prize-fights, and Walter 
promptly sues Al for a pain in the neck. 

Sammy Goldwyn makes "Nana" twice. 
(The first time Pert Kelton stole the show from 
Anna Sten.) And Connie Bennett greets 
hubby, back from the South Seas. 

De Mille sets sail for Hawaii with "Four 
Frightened People," and returns leaving one 
thousand natives not only frightened, but 
scared stiff. 

Cary Grant and Virginia Cherrill both deny 
their engagement. 

Wine cards suddenly pop up all over town. 
When you hear the sound of the gong, it's cock- 
tail time in Hollywood. The gong rings con- 
stantly. 

More divorces crowd the center of the stage 
as the baby epidemic act goes off in ermine- 
lined perambulators. Carole Lombard flies off 
to Reno, leaving Bill Powell flat, but suave. 
The Adolphe Menjous and the Richard Dixes 
sever knots, while the eternal triangle is en- 
acted by such capable artists as Adrienne 
Ames, her husband and Bruce Cabot. It's a 
touching little drama. "Just a friend," 



screams Cabot. Then comes the pay-off. 
"Just a husband," screams Bruce as Adrienne 
walks him from the altar to Honolulu. 

Connie Bennett again waves bye-bye to 
Hank, on his way to Europe. Virginia Cherrill 
bounces a glass off Cary Grant's head and both 
deny their engagement. 

Sylvia Sidney walks off " The Way to Love" 
set and goes to Europe. Paramount froths at 
the mouth. But Georgie Raft sees the light in 
the window and returns to the old mortgaged 
homestead. 

Zanuck walks out of Warner Brothers' life 
and gives birth to 20th Century Productions. 
Papa and baby doing fine, with Warners and 
Zanuck racing neck and neck to see who makes 
the same picture first. Score — 2 up for Zanuck. 

/^"'LARK GABLE loses, 1. tonsils, 2. appendix, 
^**3. ten pounds, 4. a lot of popularity to 
Lee Tracy. 

A new menace creeps on. Strikes. Elec- 
tricians and cameramen strike, causing them- 
selves grief and the companies delay. 

Dietrich goes to Europe and comes home. 
To Joey Von Sternberg and the same old pants. 
Baby LeRoy learns one word in the year 1933. 
It's "Nuts." 

Cheers greet Irving Thalberg and Norma 
Shearer on their return home. 

With a rat-a-tat-tat and a do-deo-do-do, the 
stage is cleared, making way for the big 
musical acts. 

Song writers, dance directors, chorus girls, 
prancing up and down staircases, playing 
lighted violins or jumping in and out of pools, 
hold the stage. Hollywood breaks out with an 
AIbertina Rasch. 

Radio stars barge in and barge out. Crosby, 
Ed Wynn, Kate Smith, Jack Pearl all hit town, 
with Crosby the only "hold-over." 

Virginia Cherrill and Cary Grant both leave 
town and deny their engagement. Lupe be- 
comes Mrs. Weissmuller, and with the tall and 
stately Sandra Shaw, Gary Cooper headed 
for "The Last Roundup." 

At the sound of a little flute, the audience 
rises to its feet and goes mad. 

"The Three Little Pigs" sweep the country 
with the whole world wanting to know — 
"Who's afraid of the big, bad wolf?" Zulus 
ask it. Hindus ask it. Eskimos ask it. 

Harpo Marx rushes off to Russia and United 
States immediately recognizes Russia. To 
avoid disaster when the Russian blondes get 
chased silly. 

Max Baer comes to town and becomes the 
hero of the hour. Once again Connie Bennett 
greets her little rover, home from Europe. And 
Jean Harlow throws a bombshell into the third 
act by eloping with her cameraman. 

Sylvia Sidney comes home to mama Para- 
mount, and Crawford goes bye-bye with Fran- 
chot Tone. Just friends, they say. 

APPLAUSE, deafening applause, greets the 
old tried and true stars who now come 
marching triumphantly on. May Robson, Marie 
Dressier, Mary Boland, Alison Skipworth. It's 
their year. "God bless 'em," cries all Holly- 
wood, and pauses a moment to bow its head in 
memory of a dear departed one, Louise Closser 
Hale. 

Again the audience rises and cheers as climax 
after climax breaks through to the finale. 

Garbo chooses Gilbert for her picture and 
the world approves. And then, out on a 
Mexican balcony for a final farewell, trips Mrs. 
Tracy's little boy, Lee, wrapped in a sheet. 
"Whoopee," yells Lee at a passing parade and 
the sheet slips, and so does Lee. Into a Mexi- 
can hoosegow. 

And the audience files out in shrieks of 
laughter as the final curtain descends on Holly- 
wood's Revue of the Vear 1933. 



Photoplay Magazine for February, 1934 



1I 7 




Bert Wheeler can't do any work unless his stooge, Johnny Kelly, is around 
to help him. Bert first noticed Johnny opening and closing doors for movie 
stars at the Brown Derby restaurant. Bert liked his grin and hired him. 
Now Wheeler's favorite expression is, "Has anybody here seen Kelly?" 



Everybody's Stooging Now 

[ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 53 ] 



"Sho'," explained the Southerner, "main 
paht of Gaw-gah!" 

When "Cracker" started getting more laughs 
on the sets than Oakie himself, Jack took him 
into a stooge partnership in self-defense, al- 
though to this day it is usually "Cracker" 
who makes a stooge out of Jack with his un- 
suspected and devastating wit-cracks. He is 
a sort of court jester, although to justify his 
being on the Oakie pay-roll, "Cracker" man- 
ages a number of Jack's personal affairs — and 
if you saw "Too Much Harmony," you'll re- 
member the mush-mouthed results of " Crack- 
er's" linguistic tutelage. When Jack Oakie goes 
completely Dixie in the funniest scene of the 
picture, "Cracker" Henderson, his stooge, is 
indirectly making his screen debut. 

Perhaps the best stooge-supplied star in 
Hollywood is George Raft with his former 
stooge, Sammy Finn, whom Hollywood 
dubbed "The Killer," and his present satellite, 
Mack Gray. 

Sammy, an old friend and former roommate 
of George's in New York, came to California 
for his health. When George came out, they 
met and pooled living expenses. Then came 
Raft's screen "arrival" and Sammy, who had 
plied the prosaic trade of a dealer in women's 
wear, was immediately surrounded by an 
aura of sinister rumor. It was bruited about 
that he was a bad, bad gunman and really 
George's bodyguard. Hence, "The Killer." 
However, Mr. Finn recently abandoned active 
stooging to revert to trade, opening a dress 
shop on Hollywood Boulevard. And Mack 
Green, now Gray, stepped into the heroic spot. 

MACK, whose vocation is training fighters, 
knew George in the old lightweight ring 
days, and having a run of bad luck out on the 
Coast when the depression kayoed gate re- 
ceipts, followed his former client into the 
studios. He has worked in every Raft picture. 
Maybe you've seen him — a tall, Ichabod Crane 
person. There isn't a more adhesive shadow 
in Hollywood. Wherever George goes, Mack 
is sure to be close around. 

Recently they took a cross-country auto- 



mobile trip together, and when they returned 
to Hollywood, Mack Green was Mack Gray. 

George didn't care for Green — it is his pet- 
peeve color! 

Stooges, however, are not necessarily satel- 
lites. Sometimes Hollywood endows a stooge 
with mysterious powers. 

A FFORDIXG the best example of the big 
■**-shot Hollywood stooge is John Barry- 
more's manager and perennial censor, Henry 
Hochener, a former school teacher, who has 
been Barrymore's professional protector for 
some years. Studios find him the formidable 
gate through which, and only through which, 
Barrymore can be reached, quoted or even ob- 
served. That's his job, and he does right well 
by it. His stipend is rumored to be well up 
in the five figure columns yearly. On occa- 
sion, he has been known to even countermand 
John's orders, rescind his promises and give 
him advice. 

Advice, as a matter of fact, is one thing 
generally conceded to be the prerogative of a 
Hollywood stooge. Al Jolson says he is always 
asking his driver, Jimmy Donnelly, for ad- 
vice, and then, like a darn fool, not taking it! 

Donnelly has been Jolson's perfect stooge 
for almost fifteen years. On the face of things, 
he's Al's chauffeur, but actually he's more like 
a member of the family. Often Al seeks his 
advice on financial matters. Donnelly, by the 
way, has himself become a man of means, al- 
though he still prefers to be Al Jolson's stooge. 

Recently, when Al was called to New York, 
and wife Ruby Keeler was forced to stay in 
Hollywood for a picture, Donnelly remained 
behind to look after Ruby. 

When Al finally came out again for "Won- 
der Bar," (the screen version of "Wunder 
Bar") the nightly game of "hearts" was re- 
sumed. That's one duty Al requires of his 
stooge — to buck him in his favorite card 
game. 

Often Hollywood stooges are picked up in 
the oddest places! Victor McLaglen's exotic 
stooge, Abdullah, hails from Mesopotamia. 
McLaglen found the stooge when he was the 



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Photoplay Magazine for February, 1934 




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ruler of fabulous Bagdad during the war. 
(McLaglen ruled the city of the Arabian 
Knights during five years of service for the 
British, you know.) Abdullah still performs 
the same primary duties he did in Bagdad, 
supplying boxing and wrestling opposition to 
keep Vic in trim. Besides, he's a one-man audi- 
ence and severe critic of every film role. 

Bert Wheeler found his stooge, however, 
much nearer home — at the entrance to the 
Hollywood Brown Derby where Johnny 
Kelly's business was opening and closing the 
door for movie stars, accompanying his actions 
with a spread-eagle grin. The grin struck 
Bert, who offered him a job, and now "Has 
anybody here seen Kelly? " is the first question 
Bert asks when he makes a move. For Johnny 
is a stand-in, valet, chauffeur, fan-mail secre- 
tary and social counsel, with a two year record 
of stand-out stooging to his credit. 

OOMETIMES, stooges even get to look like 
^their own particular stars. If you have been 
one of those embarrassed persons who has 
upped to John Woodward and said, "Oh, Mr. 
March — why — uh, I beg your pardon!" you 
will also remember stumbling away groping 
for your lost nonchalance and muttering, 
"But he certainly looked like Freddie!" And 
right you are. For a handsomer young 
fellow you never saw than Mr. Woodward, 
who came from Columbia University during 
one of Paramount's college talent searches, 
didn't click as an actor, settled down instead 
as secretary, stand-in and wardrobe super- 
visor to the star he resembles. 

Richard Barthelmess' Dutch Petit is another 
stooge who is a dead ringer for his star. 

The usual proprietary attitude of a Holly- 
wood stooge is something which those not 
stooge-conscious simply are unable to fa- 
thom. It enhances the law that "only editors, 
kings with tapeworm — and stooges — can use 
'we' and get by with it." 

Marie Dressler's Mamie, her colored re- 
tainer of nineteen years' service, plans her 
meals and even buys Marie's clothes en 
occasion. She knows Marie better, as Marie 
has admitted, than herself. Recently, antici- 
pating the star's return from a voyage to 
Honolulu, Mamie took it upon herself to plan 
and execute a surprise party for the home- 
coming Marie, who found six of her most 
intimate friends assembled at dinner to greet 
her! 

Myrna Loy signs blank checks for her Mexi- 
can maid and companion, Caror, to fill out 
as she needs for household expenses. 

And Slim Summerville inadvertently offend- 
ed his faithful studio stooge, Dave, when he 
turned up at Slim's Laguna Beach home one 
evening a little the worse for wear. Slim, who 
was entertaining, came out to meet him and 
pressed some bills into his hand. But that 
wasn't enough. Back at Universal studios, 
Dave bared his wounded feelings. Slim hadn't 
asked him in to join the party! 

THE parade of Hollywood's best known 
stooges winds on endlessly— Ramon Novar- 
ro's nephew and godson, Jorge Gavilan; Jack 
Pearl's Cliff Hall (Sharley), a professional 
stooge in its original meaning as well as per- 
sonal; Tom Mix's John Agee, who is said to 
have owned the famous Mix string of horses, 
excepting Tony; Junior Laemmle's protector, 
Joe Torillo; Schnozzle Durante's Jack Harvey. 

But of them all there is one — nameless here 
— who qualifies as the master stooge of Holly- 
wood's history. Stooging for a single star was 
mere child's play for this artist. He multiplied 
his talents until it seemed that he was stooging 
for everyone in Hollywood. Ten or twelve 
stars at least proudly claimed him as stooge. 
But he had even greater ambitions. He wanted 
to serve his country in his own peculiar way. 

He wanted — well, it was only discovered 
when this patriot tangled with the late Noble 
Experiment in a little business deal, and was 
quickly hailed before a Los Angeles night 
court. He was released, for the frisking of his 
person had revealed a photograph showing him 



Photoplay Magazine for February, 1934 



II 9 



walking clown a Los Angeles street with his 
arm affectionately around— of all people — a 
president of the United States! 

Somehow, during a visit of the late Calvin 
Coolidge to Los Angeles, the stooge had 
managed to frame a freak picture of himself 
in a pally pose with Coolidge. 

He was the president's stooge, he claimed, 
and the picture seemed to prove it. 

Anyway, the puzzled police let him go. 

You don't pinch a presidential stooge. 



Can a Man Love Two 

Women at the Same 

Time? 

[ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 33 ] 

kinds of life. I couldn't forever exchange the 
niceties of living for the primitive customs and 
be contented. But I like a little of each, in 
balanced proportion. 

SOME day," Gary said, a little wistfully, 
''before I am too old to enjoy the adventure 
of the thing, I want to go to India, to the jungles 
of South America, to Alaska. I'll always re- 
member my trip to the African jungle a few 
years back. It made me realize what a mar- 
velous place this old world really is and how 
much it has to offer in the way of surprises." 

Gary admits that it's this ambition which 
keeps him going in his work. For he toes a 
rigid mark in the studio schedule when he's 
working. Up at six o'clock every morning. 
Into the studio by eight at the latest. Before 
his make-up table and into his costumes, ready 
for work, by nine o'clock every morning. And 
that, friends, is no mean task especially when 
you're supposed to laugh and scowl and make 
love and everything at that early hour. 

And all the while Gary Cooper was talking, 
I kept thinking of the vast number of girls who 
have elected him their ideal screen romanticist. 
To phrase it in their own words, "the most 
wonderful lover in pictures." 

I think I found one of the clues to Gary's 
enormous popularity, aside from the fact that 
he's terribly good-looking and has the build of 
a Greek God. 

(TARY has a very disarming way of looking at 
^*-*one. He looks directly at the person to whom 
he is speaking, and his clear, blue eyes never 
flicker for even the fraction of a moment while 
you are talking. Like the candor of an inno- 
cent child who is wondering what life is all 
about. 

He has fine, strong hands, too. Artistic 
fingers which taper gracefully to rounded nails. 
The sort of hands which a palmist might say 
combined a fine sensitivity with a masculine, 
rugged practicability. 

When you have just a flash of Gary's tender 
attitude with the one girl of his heart as I 
glimpsed it that morning during his telephone 
conversation with Sandra, I no longer doubt 
why Gary Cooper is the favorite screen lover 
of thousands of girls. And the happy part of it 
is that Gary seems blissfully unaware of his 
appeal. He'd laugh it off if you tried to con- 
vince him. And I think he'd blush like a school- 
boy if he knew all the complimentary things 
women everywhere say about him. Ask any 
ten girls, in any walk of life, who their favorite 
screen romanticist is, and nine out of ten will 
tell you: "Gary Cooper." 

Marion Davies chose him especially to play 
opposite her in her latest picture "Operator 
13." And Anna Sten, imported from Russia by 
Sam Goldwyn to be starred in future produc- 
tions, was asked what screen personality she 
might like for "Barbary Coast," in which she 
is to star. 

She, too, chose Gary Cooper. And that, 
ladies, seemed to make it unanimous. 




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3eet Hukt / 



Photoplay Magazine for February, 1934 

Addresses of the Stars 




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Hollywood, Calif. 



Paramount Studios 



Brian Aherne 
Judith Allen 
Lona Andre 
Richard Arlcn 
George Barbier 
Mary Boland 
Grace Bradley 
Kathleen Burke 
Burns and Allen 
Kitty Carlisle 
Claudette Colbert 
Gary Cooper 
Buster Crabbe 
Bing Crosby 
Dorothy Dell 
Marlcne Dietrich 
Frances Drake 
W. C. Fields 
William Frawley 
Frances Fuller 
Cary Grant 
Shirley Grey 
Charlotte Henry 
Verna Millie 
Miriam Hopkins 



Roscoe Karns 
Percy Kilbride 
Jack La Rue 
Charles Laughton 
Baby LeRoy 
John Davis Lodge 
Carole Lombard 
Herbert Marshall 
Jack Oakie 
Gail Patrick 
George Raft 
Lyda Roberti 
Lanny Ross 
Charlie Ruggles 
Randolph Scott 
Sylvia Sidney 
Alison Skipworth 
Sir Guy Standing 
Kent Taylor 
Evelyn Venable 
Mae West 
Dorothea Wieck 
Toby Wing 
Elizabeth Young 



Fox Studios, 1401 N. Western Ave. 



Rosemary Ames 
Heather Angel 
Lew A\ res 
Jane Barnes 
Mona Barrie 
Warner Baxter 
Irene Bentley 
John Boles 
Clara Bow 
Nigel Bruce 
Joe Cook 

Henrietta Crosman 
Florence Desmond 
James Dunn 
Sally Filers 
Stepin Fetchit 
Norman Foster 
Preston Foster 
Dixie Frances 
Ketti Gallian 
Henry Garat 



Janet Gaynor 
Lilian Harvey 
Rochelle Hudson 
Roger Imhof 
Miriam Jordan 
Victor Jory 
Suzanne Kaaren 
Howard Lally 
Ralph Morgan 
Herbert Mundin 
George O'Brien 
Pat Paterson 
Will Rogers 
Raul Roulien 
Wini Shaw 
Sid Silvers 
Spencer Tracy 
Claire Trevor 
Blanca Vischer 
June Vlasek 
Hugh Williams 



RKO-Radio Pictures, 780 Gower St. 



Fred Astaire 
Nils Asther 
Ralph Bellamy 
Constance Bennett 
Joan Bennett 
El Brendel 
June Brewster 
Clive Brook 
Bruce Cabot 
William Cagney 
Mowita Castanada 
Ada Cavell 
Chick Chandler 
Alden Chase 
Jean Connors 
Frances Dee 
Dolores Del Rio 
Richard Dix 
Irene Dunne 
Charles Farrell 
Betty Furness 
Skeets Gallagher 
William Cargan 



Wynne Gibson 
Ann Harding 
Katharine Hepburn 
Dorothy Jordan 
Pert Kelton 
Edgar Kennedy 
Francis Lederer 
Dorothy Lee 
Eric Linden 
Helen Mack 
Sari Maritza 
Joel McCrea 
Colleen Moore 
Ginger Rogers 
Robert Shayne 
Adele Thomas 
Thelma Todd 
Nydia Westman 
Bert Wheeler 
Thelma White 
Howard Wilson 
Robert Woolsey 



United Artists Studios, 1041 N. Formosa 
Ave. 



Eddie Cantor 
Charles Chaplin 
Ronald Colman 



Douglas Fairbanks 
Mary Pickford 
Anna Sten 



20th Century Studios, 1041 N. Formosa 
Ave. 



Judith Anderson 
George Arliss 
George Bancroft 
Janet Beecher 
Sally Blane 
Constance Cummings 
Arline Judge 



Paul Kelly 
Fredric March 
Blossom Seeley 
Judith Wood 
Fay Wray 
Loretta Young 



Columbia Studios, 1438 Gower St. 



Walter Connolly 
Donald Cook 
Richard Cromwell 
Jack Holt 
Elissa Landi 
Edmund Lowe 
Tim McCoy 



Grace Moore 
Toshia Mori 
Jessie Ralph 
Gene Raymond 
Joseph Schildkraut 
Ann Sothorn 
Dorothy Tree 



Culver City, Calif. 

Hal Roach Studios 



Charley Chase 
Billy Gilbert 
Oliver Hardy 
Patsy Kelly 
Stan Laurel 
Dorothy Layton 



Lillian Moore 
Billy Nelson 
Our Gang 
Nena Quartaro 
Oliver Wakefield 



Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios 



Katherine Alexander 
Elizabeth Allan 
Agnes Anderson 
Max Baer 
John Barry more 
Lionel Barrymore 
Wallace Beery 
Alice Brady 
Charles Butterworth 
Mary Carlisle 
Ruth Channing 
Mae Clarke 
Jackie Cooper 
Joan Crawford 
Marion Davies 
Marie Dressier 
Jimmy Durante 
Nelson Eddy 
Stuart Erwin 
Madge Evans 
Muriel Evans 
Clark Gable 
Greta Garbo 
C. Henry Gordon 
Russell Hardie 
Jean Harlow 
Helen Hayes 
Ted Healy 
Jean Hersholt 
Irene Hervey 
Phillips Holmes 
Jean Howard 
Art Jarrett 



Isabel Jewell 
Otto Kruger 
Myrna Loy 
Ben Lyon 

Jeanette MacDonald 
Mala 

Margaret McConnell 
Florine McKinney 
Una Merkel 
Robert Montgomery 
Polly Moran 
Frank Morgan 
Karen Morley 
Ramon Novarro 
Laurence Olivier 
Maureen O'Sullivan 
Earl Oxford 
Jean Parker 
Jack Pearl 
Nat Pendleton 
Esther Ralston 
May Robson 
Ruth Selwyn 
Norma Shearer 
Martha Sleeper 
Mona Smith 
Lewis Stone 
FYanchot Tone 
Lupe Velez 
Johnny Weissmuller 
Ed Wynn 
Diana Wynyard 
Robert Young 



Universal City, Calif. 

Universal Studios 



Robert Allen 
Vilma Banky 
Vince Barnett 
Andy Devine 
Louise F"azenda 
Sterling Holloway 
Leila Hyams 
Buck Jones 
Boris Karloff 
Jan Kiepura 
Evalyn Knapp 
June Knight 
Paul Lukas 
Mabel Marden 



Ken Maynard 
Chester Morris 
Charlie Murray 
ZaSu Pitts 
Roger Pryor 
Claude Rains 
George Sidney 
Onslow Stevens 
Gloria Stuart 
Margaret Sullavan 
Slim Summerville 
Luis Trenker 
Alice White 



Burbank, Calif. 

Warners-First National Studios 



Loretta Andrews 
Mary Astor 
Robert Barrat 
Richard Barthelmess 
George Blackwood 
Joan Blondell 
Joe E. Brown 
Lynn Browning 
James Cagney 
Hobart Cavanaugh 
Ruth Chatterton 
Ricardo Cortez 
Bette Davis 
Claire Dodd 
Ruth Donnelly 
Ann Dvorak 
Patricia Ellis 
Glenda Farrell 
Philip Faversham 
Helen Foster 
Kay Francis 
Geraine Grear 
Hugh Herbert 
Arthur Hold 
Ann Hovey 
Leslie Howard 
Alice Jans 
Allen Jenkins 
Al Jolson 
Paul Kaye 
Ruby Keeler 



Guy Kibbee 
Lorena Layson 
Hal LeRoy 
Margaret Lindsay 
Marjorie Lytell 
Aline MacMahon 
Helen Mann 
Frank McHugh 
Adolphe Menjou 
Jean Muir 
Paul Muni 
Theodore Newton 
Pat O'Brien 
Henry O'Neill 
Edwin Phillips 
Dick Powell 
William Powell 
Phillip Reed 
Edward G. Robinson 
Barbara Rogers 
Kathryn Sergava 
Barbara Stanwyck 
Lyle Talbot 
Sheila Terry 
Genevieve Tobin 
Gordon Westcott 
Renee Whitney 
Warren William 
Pat Wing 
Donald Woods 



Lloyd Hughes, 616 Taft Bldg.. Hollywood. Calif. 

Harold Lloyd, 6640 Santa Monica Blvd., Hollywood, 

Calif. 

Neil Hamilton, 9015 Rosewood Ave., Los Angeles, 

Calif. 



Photoplay Magazine for February, 1934 

Screen Memories From Photoplay 



15 Years 



Ago 



GEORGE M. COHAN, the- 
atrical genius, approached 
Photoplay's interviewer (in mid- 
winter, mind you) bedecked in 
heavy overcoat and straw bon- 
net. And, of all things, made 
this statement: "It's up to you! 
Write what you think I ought to 
say and I'll stand for it — every 
word!" And he really meant it. 

About Colleen Moore, then 
Kathleen Morrison, we said that 
if there's any superstition con- 
cerning different colored eyes 
(one of Colleen's appeared blue, the other 
brown), it's that the person possessing them 
is sure to succeed. 

In an interview with John Barrymore, we 
described him as "the most commonplace son 
of fortune who ever lived. One of the few 
members of his profession who would never be 
taken for an actor." We marveled at his utter 
absence of affectation. 

We were convinced that the third cycle of 




John 
Barrymore 



motion picture history had closed 
and that we stood on the thresh- 
hold of the fourth 

The fust period was the pio- 
neer age. The second, the period 
of achievement — of world-wide 
recognition that the motion pic- 
ture is not a "hoodlum toy," but 
a colossal scientific triumph of 
human expression. The third 
period was the film's wild golden 
age — the age of limitless expense 
and stupendous salaries. We 
were happy indeed to be living 
in the fourth cycle, when the motion picture 
must triumph as the most human of the arts. 
An especially popular lady of the day was 
Geraldine Farrar, whose life story began in this 
issue. Such a favorite was she, that we also 
used her portrait on the cover. 

The outstanding films of the month were D. 
W. Griffith's "The Greatest Thing in Life," 
with Lillian Gish, and Lois Weber's "Borrowed 
Clothes," with Mildred Harris. 



10 Years Ago 



WHAT Kind of Women At- 
tract Men Most?" That 
question was propounded thor- 
oughly in our February, 1924, 
issue. The answer seemed un- 
mistakably to be, "Women who 
possess a marked degree of per- 
sonal magnetism, the quality that 
makes one woman stand out in a 
crowd. That is what stimulates 
an unconscious interest in men." 

We advised "very man, woman 
and child" to see Cecil B. De- 
Mille's latest production, "The 
Ten Commandments." In our review of the 
film, we called it "The best photoplay ever 
made. The greatest theatrical spectacle in 
history — the work of genius." 

Part I of Pola Negri's autobiography appear- 
ed in this issue. Her real name is Appolonia 
Chalupec. When she went on the stage in 
1913, she used the surname of Ada Negri, 
Italian poetess, and the diminutive of Appo- 
lonia, Pola. 




Pola 
Negri 



In an absorbing chapter of 
"The Romantic History of the 
Motion Picture," Terry Ram- 
,'saye recorded many startling 
events hitherto unknown to the 
movie public. 

Our gossip columns revealed 
that the lovely Gloria Swanson 
was suffering from a case of 
"Klieg eyes." She was stricken 
while filming "The Humming 
Bird." 

Doug Fairbanks, Jr., aboard 
when the Twentieth Century 
Limited was wrecked, helped doctors with 
bandages, dressings, and was of great assist- 
ance generally. They didn't know who the lad 
was until it was all over. We said Doug, Jr., 
just fourteen, was the sort we liked to think 
of as the "typical" American boy. 

Of Elinor Glyn's "Three Weeks," Photoplay 
commented: "Camera work done, the film is 
being edited and cut. Then — the censors!" 
On the cover — Corinne Griffith. 



5 Years Ago 




TX OUR issue of February, 1929, 
■'■we told of the meeting of John 
Barrymore and Dolores Costello. 
And described in detail their wed- 
ding, which had just taken place. 

We said of Nils Asther, "Be- 
cause he is one of the coming 
young men of the screen, Photo- 
play presents his story. Asther 
studied with a great actor named 
Hertel, in Copenhagen. When j^jj s 

sixteen, Nils met Mauritz Stiller, Asther 

who gave him the leading role in 
his current screen production." 

There was an article aptly titled, "The Hot 
Baby of Hollywood, otherwise Lupe Velez." 
When this fiery Mexican miss was most inter- 
ested in giving theatricals for her sisters and 
the servants, she was shipped off to a convent. 
Later, family finances were low, and Lupe, de- 
ciding to do something about it, made her way 
to Hollywood and film fame. 

A photo of Mary Pickford showed her hair 
cut quite closely at the back — a new fashion 



of the day. The shingle bob, as 
we saw it in Mary's first talkie, 
"Coquette." 

Weddings we reported were: 
Evelyn Brent and Harry Ed- 
wards, film director. "Bubbles" 
Steiffel (Betsy Lee) and Reginald 
Denny. 

All was changed then. B. T. 
(before talkies) it was customary 
to see a group of bridge enthus- 
iasts in one corner, someone 
snoozing in another, and some- 
one else reading the latest thriller, 
between scenes. But when talkies came in. 
everyone was constantly on the hop. 

Eddie Nugent reported "a terrible murder 
afoot." He'd heard talk about making "The 
Last of Mrs. Cheyney." 

Of "In Old Arizona," the first outdoor 
talkie to be made, we said, "The Fox Movie- 
toners have learned how to blend sound, con- 
versation, laughter and music to produce 
dramatic effects." 




Loretta Young and Spencer Tracy in a scene from 
the Columbia picture "A Man's Castle" 



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Who's in the Dog House Now? 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 73 



and then he wisecracks his way out. Jack also 
manages to remain pretty steadily in a sub- 
rosa dog house, so far as his fellow actors are 
concerned, by the highly unpopular device of 
stealing scenes from them. 

As one sufferer remarked, "Oakie would 'back 
up' on his own mother." And backing-up,or 
covering the other players in a scene, is an 
unforgivable offense — to another actor. All 
the audience sees in the situation is a lot more 
of Oakie! 

SALLY Eilers married herself a new husband, 
and moved in the dog house almost simul- 
taneously. She was scheduled to make" Jimmy 
and Sally" for Fox, with Jimmy Dunn. Sally 
didn't like the story, so out she walked. Maybe 
the fact that she wanted to make a picture 
under the supervision of her new husband, 
Harry Joe Brown, at Paramount, influenced 
her a trifle. Anyway, that is exactly what she 
is doing. 

Amicable relations, however, have been re- 
sumed with Fox, and all is sweetness and light. 

Sometimes, the dog house is a portable estab- 
lishment. Wally Beery once took it with him 
up to the middle of June Lake in the High 
Sierras, and a charming spot it was for a dog 
house. 

Wally's option came up and he wanted the 
advance of $500 a week, that it called for. 

The depression was on, and M-G-M said 
no! 

They'd renew at the old figure. Then Wally 
happened to see an Eskimo umyak, a little 
canoe. \V. S. Van Dyke had brought it back 
with him from Alaska. 

It looked as if things were going to remain at 
loggerheads, and Wally was about ready to give 
in — but not for nothing. 

He apparently forgot to be the business man 
in his boyish enthusiasm over the funny little 
boat. For he agreed to settle the dispute and 
come back at his old salary — if they would give 
him the umyak! 

The umyak was worth about five dollars. 

So Wally forthwith moved out of the dog 
house — into an Eskimo canoe. 

But Wally's most spectacular sojourn in the 
dog house occurred around Christmas time in 
1931. He flatly refused to play the German 
manufacturer in "Grand Hotel." For three 
weeks, he remained incommunicado at his 
home. Telegrams three pages long were dis- 
patched to him — since he refused to answer the 
telephone. 

Finally a telegram arrived telling him that 
M-G-M would take immediate action in the 
courts. Wally ignored that, too. 

THEN Irving Thalberg, that master of diplo- 
macy, sent him a wire. It was a warm, 
friendly message, in which Thalberg recounted 
the number of years he and Wally had been 
pals — he mentioned the holiday spirit, and in 
the friendliest fashion, asked Wally to please 
come to the studio and talk it over. 

That turned the trick. Wally was touched, 
for he is genuinely fond of Thalberg. So Mr. 
Beery came out of the dog house — and played 
the part. 

Margaret Sullavan, the girl who has been 
projected to stardom on the strength of one 
performance in "Only Yesterday," has built 
her own dog house and is trying her darndest to 
stay in it, with Universal attempting desper- 
ately to keep her out. 

The girl, who had an unparalleled oppor- 
tunity handed her on a silver platter, has 
pulled at cross purposes with the studio ever 
since her arrival in Hollywood. She was given 
a salary of $1,250 a week, and an opportunity 
seldom equalled. But with the picture half 
completed, she had a run in with John Stahl, 

122 



the director, stalked off the lot, and the studio 
caught her just on the verge of boarding a plane 
for New York. 

This girl is hard to figure, except that she 
suffers from a strange inferiority complex. In 
New York, she flatly turned down interviewers, 
and refused to admit that she was good in 
"Only Yesterday." But she's back in Holly- 
wood now, hard at work — and keeping one eye 
on the dog house. 

George Brent, according to many, is suffer- 
ing with wife-advice, which has kept him in the 
pooch-kennel pretty consistently. He had his 
contract with Warners suspended, when he 
refused to play two roles — one in "Mandalay" 
and one in "Heat Lightning." Also, he de- 
mands more salary. 



gave 
be tied 



Wonder Bar." 
in because they 
up 



in another 



■^-And the studio 
thought she would 
production. 

Then it developed that she would be finished 
in time — so the argument began all over again. 
But Kay doesn't care much for the dog house, 
so she came back, reluctantly. 

Sylvia Sidney shook off the shackles of the 
dog house at Paramount a while back, when 
she walked out of the Chevalier picture, "The 
Way to Love," and went to Europe. A throat 
affliction endangered her health, according to 
Sylvia. 

The studio maintained they had asked noth- 
ing unreasonable of her. Besides they couldn't 
see how it would benefit the sore throat to take 
it to Europe. 

Ann Dvorak played the vacated part, Syl- 




June Gale and her "steady," Hoot 
Gibson, were photographed at the 
opening of "Roman Scandals." Isn't 
that metallic costume June is wearing 
sophisticated and Oriental-looking? 



via came home in due time, and an armistice 
was declared by all concerned. 

Charles Farrell had a long-term lease on his 
own private canine kennel, for declining to re- 
sign with Fox. He wanted to be starred in his 
own right. For almost a year after, Charlie 
was given a nice, long vacation, during which 
he had a grand time playing polo, and almost 
forgot there was such a business as moving 
pictures. He has broken the jinx recently with 
"Aggie Appleby" and "Girl Without a Room." 

And he's now scheduled to do another pic- 
ture with Janet Gaynor. 

Jack Gilbert is another who recently ob- 
tained release from a long incarceration in the 
durance vile colloquially known as the dog 
house. 

We have called him "poor Jack" for the last 
time, however. When you see "Queen Chris- 
tina," you'll know why. 

Conway Tearle is practically the original 
dog house-keeper. He will confess with engag- 
ing frankness that he deserved it. In the days 
when he was " tops," Conway grew too big for 
his hat — and found himself ostracized from all 
studios in Hollywood. 

A FTER that, he hit the bumps — hard ones. 
•*V\ year or so ago, he staged his remarkable 
comeback on the New York stage in " Dinner 
at Eight," playing the broken-down actor fight- 
ing to keep up a front. 

His lesson dearly bought, Conway has 
returned to the scene of his former triumphs 
and defeats — to be signed by M-G-M. 

Tearle is out of the kennel for good — and 
glad of it. 

Bing Crosby fights for good stories and finds 
himself frequently occupying a small dog 
house for a short time. Dick Arlen likewise 
put up an argument for bigger and better 
characterizations — he was tired of playing dull 
people. 

But Dick has really been in the dog house in 
a big way, with only one official on his home lot. 

Dick took Joby Ralston Aden's old dressing- 
room, when he went to work regularly at Para- 
mount, several years ago. It is number thir- 
teen, and Dick is very fond of it — and very 
superstitious about it. 

Later on, when more dressing rooms were 
added, Fred Datig wanted to change the num- 
ber. 

The usually tractable Richard fought like a 
panther. Change his good-luck number? Over 
his dead body! 

But, reasoned Datig, it doesn't make sense 
to have number seven, and then thirteen, and 
then go on to eight. 

THE situation reached fever-heat — finally 
both contestants gave in. Datig got the 
number he wanted on the outside door — but 
every inside door of the three-room suite has a 
large thirteen painted on it. 

Jimmy Cagney, George Raft, Dietrich and 
Von Sternberg, Constance Bennett, are among 
the many others who have languished for one 
reason or another in the rarified atmosphere of 
the pooch-pen. 

Stories and salaries are the most frequent 
reasons for talking back and being excused 
from the room for a while — until everybody 
cools off. 

Of course, Garbo is the exception. She 
nearly always is. 

The great Greta turned the tables— and put 
the whole picture business in her own private 
dog house. 

But they always come back — because ^dog 
houses are lonely, the publicity service isn't so 
good. And what is most unendurable of all — 
in most cases, dog house inhabitants don't get 
paid! 



Photoplay Magazine for February, 1934 



Hollywood Fashions 

by Seymour 

Here is a list of the representative stores at which faithful copies of the smart styles 
shown this month can be purchased. Shop at or write the nearest store for complete 
information. 



I2 3 



ALABAMA— 
Loveman, Joseph & Loeb, 
birmingham. 
ARKANSAS- 
pollock's, 

fayette ville. 
Pollock's, 

fort smith. 
The M. M. Cohn Company, 

LITTLE ROCK. 

CALIFORNIA— 
J. W. Robinson Company, 

LOS ANGELES. 

The H. C. Capwell Company, 

OAKLAND. 

Hale Brothers, Inc., 

sacramento. 
The Emporium, 

san francisco. 

COLORADO— 
The Denver Dry Goods Company, 

DENVER. 

CONNECTICUT— 
The Manhattan Shop, 
hartford. 

DELAWARE- 
ARTHUR'S Apparel Shop, Inc., 

WILMINGTON. 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA— 
Lansburgh & Brother, 
washington. 

FLORIDA- 
RUTLAND Brothers, 

ST. PETERSBURG. 

IDAHO— 
The Mode, Ltd., 

BOISE. 

ILLINOIS- 
MARSHALL Field & Company, 

CHICAGO. 

C. E. Burns Company, 

DECATUR. 

Clarke & Company, 

PEORIA. 

S. A. Barker Company, 

SPRINGFIELD. 

INDIANA- 
RAYMOND Cooper, Inc., 

INDIANAPOLIS. 

IOWA— 
M. L. Parker Company, 

davenport. 
Younker Brothers, Inc., 

des moines. 
J. F. Stampfer Company, 

DUBUQUE. 

MAINE— 
B. Peck Company, 
lewiston. 
MARYLAND— 
Hochschild, Kohn & Company, 
baltimore. 
MASSACHUSETTS- 
JORDAN Marsh Company, 

boston. 
Forbes & Wallace, Inc., 
springfield. 
MICHIGAN— 
Wm. Goodyear & Company, 

ANN arbor. 
Seaman's, Inc., 

battle creek. 
The J. L. Hudson Company, 

DETROIT. 

Gilmore Brothers, 
kalamazoo. 



MINNESOTA— 

The Dayton Company, 

minneapolis. 

MISSOURI— 

Stix, Baer & Fuller Company, 
saint louis. 

NEBRASKA— 

Orkin Brothers, 

LINCOLN. 

NEW JERSEY— 
Hahxe & Company, 

NEWARK. 

NEW YORK— 
Kalet's, 

auburn. 
Abraham & Straus, 

brooklyn. 
The Parisian, Inc., 

ITHACA. 

Bloomingdale's, 

new york city. 
H. S. Barney Company, 

schenectady. 
Flah & Company, 

syracuse. 
D. Price & Company, 

utica. 

NORTH CAROLINA— 
J. B. Ivey & Company 
charlotte. 

OHIO— 

The A. Polsky Company, 

AKRON. 

The Mabley and Carew Co., 

cincinnati. 
The Higbie Company, 

cleveland. 
The Morehouse-Martens Company, 

columbus. 
The Rike-Kumler Co., 

DAYTON. 

The Strouss-Hirschberg Company, 
youngstown. 

OKLAHOMA- 
POLLOCK'S, 

MCALESTER. 

PENNSYLVANIA- 
ERIE Dry Goods Company, 

ERIE. 

Bowman & Company, 

harrisburg. 
Joseph Horne Company, 

pittsburgh. 
Worth's, Inc., 

YORK. 

TEXAS- 
LEVY Brothers Dry Goods Company, 

HOUSTON. 

The Wolff & Marx Company, 
san antonio. 

UTAH— 
Zion's Co-operative Mercantile Insti- 
tution, 
salt lake city. 

WISCONSIN- 
STUART'S, 

milwaukee. 
Racine Cloak Co., 

RACINE 

WEST VIRGINIA— 

Coyle & Richardson, Inc., 
charleston. 



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Casts of Current Photoplays 

Complete for every picture reviewed in this issue 



"ADVICE TO THE LOVELORN"— 20th Cen- 
tury-United Artists. — From the novel by Na- 
thaniel West. Adapted by Leonard Prasldns. 
Directed by Alfred Werlcer. The cast: Toby Pren- 
tiss, Lee Tracy; Louise Boley, Sally Blane; Benny, 
Sterling Holloway; Mrs. Prentiss, Jean Adair; 
Gaskell, Paul Harvey; Richards, Advertising Manager, 
Matt Briggs; Circulation Manager, Charles Levinson; 
Miss Curtis, Adalyn Doyle; Kranz, C. Henry Gordon; 
Rose, Isabel Jewell; Cora, Judith Wood; Horace, 
Etienne Girardot; Miss Howell, Ruth Fallows; Miss 
Lonelyhearls, May Boley. 

"ALICE IN WONDERLAND"— Paramount — 
F'rom the story by Lewis Carroll. Screen play by 
Joseph L. Mankiewicz and William Cameron Men- 
zies. Directed by Norman McLeod. The cast: 
Alice, Charlotte Henry; The Cheshire Cat, Richard 
Arlen; The Fish, Rosco Ates; The Gryphon, William 
Austin; White Pawn, Billy Barty; The Baby, Billy 
Barty; Two of Spades, Billy Bevan; Garden Frog, 
Colin Campbell; Father William, Harvey Clark; The 
White Knight, Gary Cooper; Leg of Mutton, Jack 
Duffy; 1st Executioner, Harry Ekezian; Uncle Gd- 
bert, Leon Errol; The White Queen, Louise Fazenda; 
llumply Damply. W. C. Fields; The King of Hearts, 
Alec B. Francis; The White Rabbit, "Skeets" Galla- 
gher; 3rd Executioner, Meyer Grace; The Mock Turtle, 
Cary Grant; Governess, Ethel GrifKes; The Cook, 
Lillian Harmer; The Mouse, Raymond Hatton; The 
Frog, Sterling Holloway; The Mad Halter, Edward 
Everett Horton; Tweedledee, Roscoe Karns; The 
Clock, Colin Kenny; Joker, Baby LeRoy; Father 
William's Son, Lucien Littlefield; The Sheep, Mae 
Marsh; Five of Spades, Charles McNaughton; The 
Dodo Bird, Polly Moran; Tweedledum, Jack Oakie; 
The Aunt, Patsy O'Byrne; The Red Queen, Edna May 
Oliver; Plum Pudding, George Ovey; The Queen of 
Hearts, May Robson; The March Hare, Charlie 
Ruggles; Dormouse, Jackie Searl; The Duchess, 
Alison Skipworth; The Caterpillar, Ned Sparks; 
Seven of Spades, Will Stanton; The White King, 
Ford Sterling; 2nd Executioner, Joe Torrillo; Alice's 
Sister, Jacqueline Wells. 

"AS HUSBANDS GO"— Fox.— From the play 
by Rachel Crothers. Screen play by Sonya Levien. 
Directed by Hamilton MacFadden. The cast: Charles 
Lingard, Warner Baxter; Hippolilus Lomi, Warner 
Oland; Lucille Lingard, Helen Vinson; Emmie Sykes, 
Catherine Doucet; Ronald Derbyshire, G. P. Hunt- 
ley, Jr.; Jake Canon, Frank O'Connor; Peggy Sykes, 
Eleanor Lynn; Wilbur, Jay Ward. 

"BELOVED" — Universal.— From the screen 
play by Paul Gangelin. Directed by Victor Schert- 
zinger. The cast: Carl Hausmann, John Boles; 
Lucy Hausmann, Gloria Stuart; Baron Von Haus- 
mann, Albert Conti; Baroness Von Hausmann, 
Dorothy Peterson; Eric, Morgan Farley; Patricia, 
Ruth Hall; Rounlree, Anderson Lawlor; Major Tar- 
rant, Edmund Breese; Mrs. Tarrant, Louise Carter; 
Carl (age 10), Lester Lee; Tommy, Mickey Rooney; 
Lord Landslake, Holmes Herbert; Judge Belden, 
Richard Carle; The Duchess, Lucille Gleason; Marie, 
Mae Busch; Mrs. Briggs, Lucille La Verne; Mrs. 
O'Leary, Mary Gordon; Charles, Eddie Woods; 
Henry Burrows, Oscar Apfel; Helen Burrows, Jane 
Mercer; Yates, Wallis Clark; Revolutionist Leader, 
Josef Swickard; Wilcox, James Flavin; Mrs. Watkins, 
Bessie Barriscale; The Dancer, Bobbe Arnst; Charles 
(as a boy), Jimmy Butler; Midvaney, Fred Kelsey ; Mr. 
Dietrich, Otto Hoffman; Eric (as a boy), George 
Ernest; Doctor, Cosmo Kyrle Bellew; Second Doctor, 
King Baggot; Tom (as a boy), Sherwood Bailey; Jew- 
ish Father, William Straus; Laurrlte, Neysa Nourse; 
Alice, Peggy Terry; Miss Murfee, Clara Blandick; 
Countess von Brandenburg, Margaret Mann. 

"BIG SHAKEDOWN, THE"— First National. 
— From the story by Sam Engles. Screen play by 
Rian James. Directed by John Francis Dillon. 
The cast: Jimmy Morrell, Charles Farrell; Norma, 
Bette Davis; Barnes, Ricardo Cortez; Lil, Glenda 
Farrell; Lefty, Allen Jenkins; John, Philip Favers- 
liam; Trigger, Adrian Morris; Sheffner, Frank 
Reicher; Gyp, George Pat Collins; Slim, Dewey 
Robinson; Spike, Ben Hendricks; Short, George 
Cooper; Regan, Robert Emmett O'Connor; Gardi- 
■nelli, Harold Huber. 

"BIG TIME OR BUST"— Tower Prod.— From 
the stage play "Excess Baggage." Dialogue by 
George Wallace Sayre. Directed by Sam Neufeld. 
The cast: Jimmy Kane, Regis Toomey; Betty 
Roberts, Gloria Shea; John Hammond, Walter Byron; 
Wiuthrop Allen, Edwin Maxwell; Paddy Melon, 
Charles Delaney; Louie, Paul Porcasi; Lew Feld, 
Nat Carr. 

"BOMBAY MAIL"— Universal.— From the 
story by L.G. Blochman. Screen play by L. G. Bloch- 
man. Directed by Edwin L. Marin. The cast: 
Inspector Dyke, Edmund Lowe; Beatrice Jones, Shir- 
ley Grey; John Hawley, Onslow Stevens; William 
Luke-Palson, Ralph Forbes; Xavier, John Davidson; 
Lady Daniels, Hedda Hopper; Civil Surgeon, Tom 
Moore; Martini, John Wray; Pundit Chundra, 
Brandon Hurst; Capt. Gerald Worthing, Jameson 
Thomas; Sir Antlwny Daniels, Ferdinand Gott- 



schalk; Dr. Maurice Lenoir, George Renavent; 
Cuthberl Neal, Garry Owen; Burgess, Huntly Gordon; 
Edward Breeze, Herbert Corthell; Maharajah of 
Zungore, Walter Armitage; Anderson, Douglas Ger- 
rard; Collins, Harry Allen. 

" BY CANDLELIGHT "—Universal. — From 
the play by Seigfried Geyer. Adapted by F. Hugh 
Herbert and Hans Kraly. Directed by James 
Whale. The cast: Marie, Elissa Landi; Josef, Paul 
Lukas; Count Von Rommer, Nils Asther; Countess 
Von Rischenheim, Dorothy Revier; Count Von 
Rischenheim, Lawrence Grant; Baroness Von Ballin 
(Louise), Esther Ralston; Baron Von Ballin, War- 
burton Gamble; Ann, Lois January. 

"CONVENTION CITY"— First National.— 
From the story by Peter Milne. Screen play by 
Robert Lord. Directed by Archie Mayo. The cast: 
Nancy Lorraine, Joan Blondell; Kent, Adolphe 
Menjou; Jerry Ford, Dick Powell; Arlene Dale, 
Mary Astor; George Ellerbe, Guy Kibbee; Will 
Goodwin, Frank McHugh; Claire Honeywell, Pa- 
tricia Ellis; Mrs. Elhrbe, Ruth Donnelly; Hotsleller, 
Hugh Herbert; J. B. Honeywell, Grant Mitchell; 
Orchard, Hobart Cavanaugh; Mrs. Kent, Sheila 
Terry; Phil Lorraine, Gordon Westcott; Lulu, Bar- 
bara Rogers; Graham, Harry C. Bradley; Hadley, 
Douglas Dumbrille; Clerk, Lorin Raker; McAllister, 
Samuel Hinds; Customer, William Burress; Mrs. 
Orchard, Virginia Howell; Zorb, Egon Brecher; 
Travis, Johnny Arthur; Bootlegger, Huey White. 

"COUNSELLOR-AT-LAW" — Universal. — 
From the play by Elmer Rice. Screen play by Elmer 
Rice. Directed by William Wyler. The cast: 
George Simon, John Barrymore; Regina Gordon, 
Bebe Daniels; Cora Simon, Doris Kenyon; John P. 
Tedesco, Onslow Stevens; Bessie Green, Isabel Jewell; 
Roy Darwin, Melvyn Douglas; Lillian LaRue, Thel- 
ma Todd; Zedorah Chapman, Mayo Methot; Herbert 
Howard Weinberg, Marvin Kline; Arthur Sandler, 
Conway Washburn; Breitstein, John Qualen; Henry 
Susskind, Bobby Gordon; McFadden, John Ham- 
mond Dailey; Sarah Becker, Malka Kornstein; Goldie 
Rindskopf, Angela Jacobs; Lena Simon, Clara Langs- 
ner; Peter J . Malone, T. H. Manning; Francis Clark 
Baird, Elmer Brown; Dorothy, Barbara Perry; Rich- 
ard, Richard Quine; David Simon, Victor Adams; 
Gray field, Frederick Burton; Harry Becker, Vincent 
Sherman. 

"DANCING LADY"— M-G-N.— From the story 
by James Warner Bellah. Screen play by Allen 
Rivkin and P. J. Wolfson. Directed by Robert Z. 
Leonard. The cast: Janie, Joan Crawford; Patch 
Gallegher, Clark Gable; Tod Newton, Franchot Tone; 
Mrs. Newton, May Robson; Rosette, Winnie Lightner; 
Fred Astaire, Fred Astaire; Ward King, Robert 
Benchley; Steve, Ted Healy; Vivian Warner, Gloria 
Foy; Art, Art Jarrett; Bradley, Sr., Grant Mitchell; 
Bradley, Jr., Maynard Holmes; Nelson Eddy, Nelson 
Eddy; Stooges, Moe Howard, Jerry Howard, Larry 
Fine; Author, Sterling Holloway. 

"DARK HAZARD "—First National.— From 
the story by W. R. Burnett. Screen play by Brown 
Holmes and Ralph Block. Directed by Alfred E. 
Green. The cast: Jim Turner, Edward G. Robin- 
son; Marge, Genevieve Tobin; Valerie, Glenda Far- 
rell; Tex, Robert Barrat; Joe, Gordon Westcott; 
George, Hobart Cavanaugh; Bright, Sidney Toler; 
Pres Barrow, George Meeker; Mrs. Mayhew, Emma 
Dunn; Fallen, Williard Robertson; Schutz, Henry B. 
Walthall; Miss Dolby, Barbara Rogers; Plumber, 
William V. Mong; "Soapy" Sam Lambert, George 
Chandler. 

"EAST OF FIFTH AVENUE"— Columbia.— 
From the story by Lew Levenson. Screen play by 
Jo Swerling. Directed by Albert Rogell. The cast: 
Vic, Wallace Ford; Kitty, Dorothy Tree; Edna, 
Mary Carlisle; Lawlon, Walter Connolly; Baxter, 
Walter Byron; Gardner, Lucien Littlefield; Dr. Mor- 
gan, Willard Robertson; Mrs. Lawlon, Louise Carter; 
Mrs. Conway, Maude Eburne; Cronin, Harry Hol- 
man; Lizzie, Fern Emmett; Rosie, Bradley Page; 
Miss Smylhe, Kate Campbell. 

"EASY MILLIONS"— Freuler Film.— From 
the story by Edgar Franklin. Adapted by Jack 
Jevne. Directed by Fred Newmeyer. The cast: 
John Harley, Richard "Skeets" Gallagher; Harry 
Wolcolt, Johnny Arthur; Helen Stephens, Merna 
Kennedy; Althea Wicks, Dorothy Burgess; John D. 
Wicks, Noah Beery; Mildred Ames, Gay Seabrook; 
Betty Kenningham, Pauline Garon; Aunt Faith Har- 
ley, Ethel Wales; Dr. Fosdyck, Arthur Hoyt; Wilbur 
Alderslon, Bert Roach; William Potter, Walter Long; 
Simon BraiJed, Henry Rocquemore; Link, Theodore 
Adams. 

"EAT 'EM ALIVE"— Real Life Pictures. — 
Directed by Harold Austin. Photographed by Jay 
Turner. 

"FAREWELL TO LOVE" — Associated Sound 
Film. — From the German film "Die Singende Stadt." 
Directed by Carmine Gallone. The cast: Giovanni 
Gavalloni, Jan Kiepura; Claire Winter, Betty Stock- 
field; Hon. Roddy Fielding, Hugh Wakefield; Car- 



mela, Heather Angel; John Barlow, Philip Easton; 
Chi, Francesco Maldaccea. 

"FRONTIER MARSHAL"— Fox.— From the 
novel by Stuart N. Lake. Screen play by William 
Conselman and Stuart Anthony. Directed by Lew 
Seiler. The cast: Michael Wyatl, George O'Brien; 
Mary Reid, Irene Bentley; Abe Ruskin, George E. 
Stone; "Doc" Warren, Alan Edwards; Queenie La- 
Vere, Ruth Gillette; Hiram Melton, Berton Churchill; 
Oscar Reid, Frank Conroy; Ben Mirchison, Ward 
Bond; Judge Walters, Edward LeSaint; Editor 
Pickett, Russell Simpson; Jerome, Jerry Foster. 

"GALLANT LADY"— 20th Century-United 
Artists. — From the story by Gilbert Emery and 
Douglas Doty. Screen play by Sam Mintz. Directed 
by Gregory La Cava. The cast: Sally, Ann Hard- 
ing; Dan, Clive Brook; Phillip Lawrence, Otto 
Kruger; Mario, Tullio Carminati; Deedy, Dickie 
Moore; Maria, Janet Beecher; Cynthia, Betty Law- 
ford; Mrs. Lawrence, Ivy Merton; Aunt, Theresa 
Maxwell Conover; Nurse, Adrienne D'Ambricourt; 
Butler, Charles Coleman. 

"GIRL WITHOUT A ROOM "—Paramount — 
From the story by Jack Lait. Screen play by Frank 
Butler and Claude Binyon. Directed by Ralph 
Murphy. The cast: Tom Duncan, Charles Farrell; 
Vergil Crock, Charlie Ruggles; Kay Loring, Mar- 
guerite Churchill; Nada, Grace Bradley; General, 
Gregory Ratoff; Arthur Copeland, Walter Woolf; 
Trotsky, Leonid Snegoff; Walksky, Mischa Auer; 
Gallopsky, Leonid Kinsky; Sitsky, Alex Melesh; 
l'urre, August Tollaire; Henri, Adrian Rosley; 
De Bergerac, Perry Ivans; Art Judge, William P. 
Colvin; Street Singer, Sam Ash. 

"HE COULDN'T TAKE IT"— Monogram.— 
From the story by Dore Schary. Screen play by 
Dore Schary and George Waggner. Directed by 
William Nigh. The cast: Jimmy Case, Ray Walker; 
Eleanor Rogers, Virginia Cherrill; Sammy Kohn, 
George E. Stone; Sweet Sue, Stanley Fields; Grace 
Clarice, Dorothy Granger; Mrs. Case, Jane Darwell; 
Nick, Paul Porcasi; Oakley, Donald Douglas; Blonde, 
Astrid Allwyn; Radio Announcer, Franklin Parker; 
Driscoll, Jack Kennedy. 

"HER SPLENDID FOLLY "—Hollywood 
Pictures. — From the story by Beulah Poynter. 
Directed by William O'Connor. The cast: Joan 
McAllister, Lilian Bond; Laura Gerard, Lilian Bond; 
Solomon Ginsberg, Alexander Carr; Wallace Morley, 
Theodore Von Eltz; Paul de Silva, Lloyd Whitlock; 
Mrs. McAllister, Beryl Mercer; Charlie Hemingway, 
Frank Glendon; Sally Lee, Roberta Gale; Ana- 
stasia, Frances Lee. 

"HOLD THE PRESS"— Columbia.— From the 
story by Horace McCoy. Directed by Phil Rosen. 
The cast: Tim Collins, Tim McCoy; Edith While, 
Shirley Grey; Abbott, Wheeler Oakman; Frankie 
While, Henry Wadsworth; Bishop, Oscar Apfel; 
Sereno, Bradley Page; Abbott's Secretary, Jack Long; 
Taylor, Samuel Hinds. 

"HORSE PLAY" — Universal. — From the story 
by Edward Sedgwick and Ebba Havez. Screen play 
by H. M. Walker and Clarence Marks. Directed by 
Edward Sedgwick. The cast: Slim Perkins, Slim 
Summerville; Andy, Andy Devine; Angelica Wayne, 
Leila Hyams; The Duchess, May Beatty; dementia, 
Una O'Connor; Uncle Percy, David Torrence; Philip 
Marley, Cornelius Keefe; Oswald, Ferdinand Gott- 
schalk; Emily, Ethel Griffies. 

"IF I WERE FREE"— RKO- Radio.— From the 
play "Behold, We Live" by John Van Druten. 
Screen play by Dwight Taylor. Directed by Elliott 
Nugent. The cast: Sarah Cazenove, Irene Dunne; 
Gordon Evers, Clive Brook; 7"ono Cazenove, Nils 
Asther; Hector Stribling, Henry Stephenson; Jewel 
Slribling, Vivian Tobin; Dame Evers, Laura Hope 
Crews; Mrs. Gill, Tempe Pigott; Mrs. Evers, Lor- 
raine MacLean. 

"JIMMY AND SALLY"— Fox.— From the 
screen play by Paul Schofield and Marguerite 
Roberts. Directed by James Tinling. The cast: 
Jimmy, James Dunn; Sally, Claire Trevor; Ralph 
Andrews, Harvey Stephens; Pola Wenski, Lya Lys; 
E. W. Marlowe, Jed Prouty; Shirley, Gloria Roy; 
Mary, Alma Lloyd; Joe, John Arledge. 

"LADY KILLER" — Warners. — From the story 
by Rosalind Shaffer. Screen play by Ben Markson 
and Lillie Hayward. Directed by Roy Del Ruth. 
The cast: Dan, James Cagney; Myra, Mae Clarke; 
Duke, Leslie Fenton; Lois, Margaret Lindsay; 
Ramick, Henry O'Neill; Conroy, Willard Robertson; 
Jones, Douglas Cosgrove; Pete, Raymond Hatton; 
Smiley, Russell Hopton; The Escort, George Black- 
wood; Williams, William Davidson; Mrs. Marley, 
Marjorie Gateson; Brannigan, Robert Elliott; Ken- 
dall, John Marston; Spade, Douglas Dumbrille; 
Thompson, George Chandler. 

"MASTER OF MEN"— Columbia. — From the 
story by Chester Erskin and Eugene Solow. Screen 



12k 



Photoplay Magazine for February, 1934 



play by E. E. Paramore, Jr. and Setnn I. Miller. 
Directed by Lambert Hillyer. The cast: Buck 
Garrett, Jack Holt; Kay Walling, Fay Wray; Gren- 
aker, Theodore Von Eltz; Parker, Walter Connolly; 
Mr. Walling, Berton Churchill. 

"MR. SKITCH"— Fox.— From the story 
"Green Dice" by Anne Cameron. Screen play by 
Ralph Spence and Sonya Levien. Directed by James 
Cruze. The cast: Mr. Skilch, Will Rogers; Mrs. 
Skitch, ZaSu Pitts; Emily Skilch, Rochelle Hudson; 
Cohen, Harry Green; Harvey Denby, Charles Star- 
rett; Flo, Florence Desmond; Cliff Merriweather, 
Eugene Pallette. 

"RIGHT TO ROMANCE, THE"— Rko- Radio. 
— From the story by Myles Connolly. Screen play 
by Sidney Buchman and Henry McCarty. Directed 
by Alfred Santell. The cast: Peggy, Ann Harding; 
Bob Preble, Robert Young; Dr. Heppling, Nils Asther; 
Lee Joyce, Sari Maritza; Dr. Beck, Irving Pichel; 
Mrs. Preble, Helen Freeman; Bunny, Alden Chase; 
Bill, Delmar Watson; The Dcnvager, Louise Carter; 
The Boy, Bramwell Fletcher; Eve Lane, Patricia 
O'Brien; Mr. Macy, Howard Hickman; Sister Eliza- 
beth, Thelma Hardwick. 

"ROMAN SCANDALS"— Samuel Goldwyn- 
Un'ited Artists. — From the story by George S. 
Kaufman and Robert Sherwood. Adapted by Wil- 
liam Anthony McGuire. Directed by Frank Tuttle. 
The cast: Eddie, Eddie Cantor; Olga, Ruth Etting; 
The Princess Sylvia, Gloria Stuart; Josephus, David 
Manners; The Empress Agrippa, Verree Teasdale; 
The Emperor Valerius, Edward Arnold; Majordomo, 
Alan Mowbray; Manius, Jack Rutherford; .4 Slave 
Girl, Grace Poggi; Chief of Police, Charles C. Wilson; 
Mayor, Harry Holman; Cooper, Willard Robertson; 
Kiep, Lee Kohlmar. 

"SITTING PRETTY "—Paramount.— From the 
story by Nina Wilcox Putnam. Screen play by 
Jack McGowan, S. J. Perelman and Lou Breslow. 
Directed by Harry Joe Brown. The cast: Chick 
Parker, Jack Oakie; Pele Pendleton, Jack Haley; 
Dorothy, Ginger Rogers; Gloria DuVal, Thelma Todd; 
Tannenbaum, Gregory Ratoff ; Jules Clark, Lew Cody; 
Pianist, Harry Revel; Buzz, Jerry Tucker; Song 
Publisher, Mack Gordon; Vinton, Hale Hamilton; 
George Wilson, Walter Walker; Norman Lubin, 
Kenneth Thomson; Director, William Davidson; 
Assistant Director, Lee Moran. Also: Pickens 
Sisters, Beverly Hill Billies, Art Jarrett, Virginia 
Sale. 

"SMOKY"— Fox.— From the story by Will 
James. Screen play by Stuart Anthony and Paul 



Perez. Directed by Eugene Forde. The cast: 
Clint, Victor Jory; Betty Jar vis, Irene Bentley; Jeff 
Nicks, Frank Campeau; Buck, Hank Mann; Lefty, 
Leroy Mason; Junk Man, Leonid Snegoff; Smoky, 
Smoky; Narrator, Will James. 

"THUNDERING HERD, THE"— Paramount. 
— From the story by Zane Grey. Screen play by 
Jack Cunningham and Mary Flannery. Directed by 
Henry Hathaway. The cast: Tom Doane, Randolph 
Scott; Milly Fayre, Judith Allen. Bill Hatch, Larry 
(Buster) Crabbe; Randall Jell, Noah Beery; Jude 
Pilchuck, Raymond Hatton; Clark Spragne, Harry 
Carey; Joe Billings, Monte Blue; Mrs. Jell, Blanche 
Fridcrici; Pruilt, Barton MacLane; Andrews, Charles 
McMurphy; <>/</ Buffalo Hunter, Buck Connors; 
Callee, Al Bridge; Blacksmith, Frank Rice; Middle 
Wat, Dick Rush. 

"WINE, WOMEN AND SONG"— Monogram. 
— From the story by Leon D'Usseau. Directed by 
Herbert Brenon. The cast: Frankie Arnelle, Lilyan 
Tashman; Morgan Andrews, Lew Cody; Ray J<>y<c, 
Matty Kemp; Marylin Arnette, Marjorie Moore; 
Jenny Tilson, Bobbe Arnst; Lolly, Esther Muir; 
Photographer, Bobby Watson; Don, Paul Gregory. 

"WOMAN WHO DARED. THE"— Wm. Berke 
Prod. — From the story by C. Edward Roberts, King 
Guidice, Robert Webb. Adapted by Curtis Kenyon. 
Directed by Millard Webb. The cast: Mickey 
Martin, Claudia Dell; Jack Goodwin, Monroe Owsley; 
Kay Wilson, Lola Lane; Charlie, Douglas Fowley; 
Maywood, Robert Elliott; Montgomery, Herbert 
Evans; Scialo, Matty Fain; Jackson, Bryant Wash- 
burn; King, Eddie Kane; Mae Compton, Esther 
Muir, Phil, Mathew Betz; Louie, Paul Fix; Tom, 
Sidney Bracy; Police Captain, Joseph Girard. 

"WOMEN IN HIS LIFE, THE" — M-G- 
M. — From the screen play by F. Hugh Her- 
bert. Directed by George B. Seitz. The cast: Bar- 
ringer, Otto Kruger; Simmons, Una Merkel; Roger, 
Ben Lyon; Catherine, Isabel Jewell; Lester, Roscoe 
Karns; Doris, Irene Hervey; Tony, C. Henry Gordon; 
Worthing, Samuel S. Hinds; Mrs. Steele, Irene Frank- 
lin; Molly, Muriel Evans; Curly, Raymond Hatton; 
Information Girl, Jean Howard; Paul, Paul Hurst. 

"YOU MADE ME LOVE YOU"— Majestic 
Pictures. — From the adaptation of a modernized 
version suggested by "The Taming of the Shrew" 
by Stanley Lupino. Directed by Monty Banks. 
The cast: Pamela Berne, Thelma Todd; Tom Daley, 
Stanley Lupino; Harry Berne, John Loder; Oliver 
Berne, James Carew. 




Raquel Torres is back on home ground after a sojourn into British pictures. 
She played the lead in "The Red Wagon." Since her return Raquel is 
being seen very frequently on the arm of Stephen Ames, Adrienne's ex 





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Cal York's Monthly Broadcast from Hollywood 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 96 j 



T\ THEN Marion Da vies wants anything, she 
gets it. Marion thought it would be nice 
if she had her own private projection room at 
M-G-M. So there's one being built in her 
dressing bungalow. It's the only one of its 
kind in Hollywood. 

(^LARK GABLE is quite a Cali- 
^^fornia booster. During a mis- 
placed warm spell, someone re- 
marked, " This is earthquake 
weather." 

"Oh no," defended Clark, politely, 
"it isn't the weather that causes the 
earthquakes — it's the earthquakes 
that cause the weather!" 

Now all he has to do is alibi the 
earthquakes! 

T\ 7"ELL, sir, you just can't beat the phil- 
^^ osophy of Stepin Fetchit, the colored boy 
who created such a stir in Hollywood a few 
years ago and is now back on the Fox lot for 
more work. 

"Naw, sir," Stepin says with that slow 
drawl of his, "when I was heah in Hollywood 
b_'foh you-all white people was insist!?? I save 
muh money and puts it away in the bank like 
you all done done. 'Stead I bought muhself 
some big cars and had a swell time. Oh, I had 
a grand time, no mistakin'. And now I comes 
back and you-all who puts your money in the 
bank done lost it all in the panic and ain't got 
none anymore while I had that wonderful time 
to remembers. Why you-all ain't even got 
that good time to remember. I'm spending 
this time, too," he grins. 

And there's no argument here. Stepin, alas, 
is right! 

T^IETRICH was first to appear in feathers, 
"^you may remember, when she wore a coque 
feather boa in "Shanghai Express." She is 
pointed to with pride by Hollywood when any- 
one mentions the vogue for feather trimming 
that has lately swept the country's cocktail 
bars and dance floors. 

Now it's plumes, no less, curled ostrich 
plumes in decorative bunches on white satin, 
that ornament one of her most beauteous gowns 
in " Catherine the Great." 

Designer Travis Banton admits no Dietrich 
picture would be complete without at least one 
feather-trimmed gown. 

A WRITER was discussing Mae 
■**■ Clarke's bad luck with her the 
other day. "This year you broke 
your jaw," the writer said, "and 
wasn't it last year you broke your 
neck?" 

"Oh no," said plucky little Mae, 
"that'll be next year." 

"RUNNY that little, wistful, seventeen-year 
■^ old Jean Parker should have been chosen by 
the very exclusive Katharine Hepburn as one of 
her intimates. 

The friendship started during the making of 
"Little Women." 

Jean, by the way, is regarded in Hollywood as 
probably the most promising of all the younger 
actresses, and no one will even admit that she 
is not destined for important triumphs. RKO- 
Radio evidenced their faith in her by putting 



her in Dorothy Jordan's former role in "Wild 
Birds." 



T ITTLE Isabel Jewell, Lee Tracy's girl friend, 
had a heartbreaking time even getting a toe- 
hold in the movies. Nobody, it seems, wanted 
little Isabel. And then M-G-M signed her, 
after several successful bits, and now just 
lookee! About every studio in Hollywood is 
fighting for her services. 

Don't ask me why, but that's just the way it 
is. Motto: If no one wants you, get yourself 
signed up somewhere and the whole world will 
fight to get you. 

A CCORDING to her cameraman, Katharine 

Hepburn can change her expression more 

times to the minute than any other actress on 



the screen. Here is the surprising explanation 
Katie gives for her gymnastic features: Her 
hair is very fine, snarly and curly. Since she 
was a little girl, she has always made faces in 
the mirror while her hair was being combed! 
She still does, and some of 'em are plenty 
weird. 

HPHE days of Garbo's supremacy 
are numbered. 

No longer may Queen Greta stand 
unchallenged. 

Jean Muir, Warners' new find, 
who will play her first lead in "As the 
Earth Turns," and whom experts say 
is very, very beautiful, takes a num- 
ber nine to accommodate her over- 
sized gunboats. 




The whole movie world has waited for months on end for the first screen 
appearance of this lady. She is Anna Sten, the Russian actress, brought 
to America to play the lead in "Nana." Rumor says she's a good bet 



126 



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If you shop in San Francisco 
...visit the Emporium's "Cin- 
ema Shop" in January! There 
you will find, among many 
charming motion picture cos- 
tumes sponsored by Photo- 
play, this lovely frock worn by 
Miriam Hopkins in the new 
Paramount play, "All of Me. " 



ID IF AS M II O l \ § are Sold ZxcUveLj t ¥ 

One of a distinguished 
group .... this splendid Cal- 
ifornia institution .... stores of style 
leadership in many principal cities which 
offer in "Hollywood Fashions" a colorful new 
vogue — the radiant costumes of your favorite stars ! 




PHOTOPLAY MAGAZINE. 9 '9 ©V Jfkk 9 an cf^, Ghk^o, M. 

In Association With Wakefield « O'Connor, Inc. 




ativauj 



AARCH 



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L 30 Cents in Canada 






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NORMA SHEARER 



s It G arbo or Hepburn ? 




GAYNOR 




^fiana 







Robert 
Henrietta 





Richard CROMWELL 
• Stepin FETCHIT • 



* Mona 



BARRIE 



DIRECTED BY HENRY KING 

SCREEN PLAY BY REGINALD BERKELEY 

FROM "THE HOUSE OF CONNELLY" BY PAUL GREEN 




Uorious love- story in a setting vibrant with drama. Seven stars, 
the season s most illustrious cast, enthrall you as it unfolds. A human, pulsing 
romance that will be engraved in your memory for all of 1 (?J4* WW/ 




Photoplay Magazine for March, 1934 



yl/uatas 5k 




GIVES THE JAUNTIEST TURN TO A SPORTS HAT . . . IGNORES 
HER CLOUDY TEETH . ..HER TENDER GUMS. . . AND SHE HAS ''Pink Tooth BrUSh"! 



Can you imagine a girl's taking the trou- 
ble to find just the right hat and to give it 
just the right tilt— and then strolling off 
to a luncheon engagement in a sports coat 
all wrinkled from a ride in the rain? 

Yet this girl's dingy teeth are just as 
conspicuous— and just as disappointing — 
as a wrinkled coat would be! They don't 
fit in! 

Of course she brushes her teeth. As often 
and as carefully as you do! But she hasn't 
yet learned that if your gums are weak 



and flabby and have a tendency to bleed, 
no amount of brushing your teeth will 
make them look their brightest! 

YOUR GUMS NEED IPANA, TOO! 

Those soft foods which you eat day after 
day can't give proper stimulation to your 
gums. And inactive gums soon become 
soft and tender. You are likely to develop 
"pink tooth brush." 

Follow the advice of dental science: 
Massage your gums. After cleaning your 



teeth, put a little extra Ipana on your 
brush or fingertip and rub it lightly into 
your gums. The ziratol in Ipana aids in 
toning and hardening your gums. 

In avoiding "pink tooth brush," you 
avoid not only dull teeth — but the possi- 
bility of gingivitis, pyorrhea, Vincent's 
disease, and other threatening gum trou- 
bles. You avoid, too, the possibility of en- 
dangering perfectly sound teeth. 

Use Ipana with massage — and your 
teeth will be as attractive as the rest of you ! 



THE "IPANA TROUBADOURS" ARE BACK I 
EVERY WEDNESDAY EVENING, 9.00, E. S.T. 
WEAF AND ASSOCIATED N. B. C. STATIONS 

IPANA 

TOOTH PASTE 




BRISTOL-MYERS CO., Dept. I-J4 
73 West Street, New York, N. Y. 

Kindly send me a trial tube of IPANA TOOTH 
PASTE. Enclosed is a three-cent stamp to cover 
partly the cost of packing and mailing. 

Name 

Strict 

City State 




Scotty Welbourne 



JEAN MUIR looks most attractive in her black and white ensemble, 
with a galyac turban and gloves to match. The elbow length fur 
gauntlets are an interesting fashion note, but rather a warm fad, it 
seems, for sunny California! Jean recently finished making "As the 
Earth Turns," a Warner film in which she played the feminine lead 



Photoplay Magazine for March, 1934 



7 








x 






/TV 



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^ 



"42nd Street"... "Gold Diggers". . ."Footlight Parade' 
. . . and now the most spectacular attraction the 
show world has ever known — "Wonder Bar". Sensa- 
tion of two continents on the stage, it comes to the 
screen in a blaze of unrivalled splendor to give you a 
gloriously new conception of musical screen spectacle! 




WONDER BAR 



Starring 



AL JOLSON 
DOLORES DEL RIO 
RICARDO CORTEZ 
F I F I D'ORSAY 
HUGH HERBERT 
RUTH DONNELLY 
MERNA KENNEDY 

Directed by LLOYD BACON • D 
directed by BUSBY BERKELEY 



KAY FRANCIS 
DICK POWELL 
HAL LEROY 
GUY KIBBEE 
KATHRYN SERGAVA 
ROBERT BARRAT 
HENRY KOLKER 

ance numbers created and 
• A First National Picture 



Ike Audi 



lence 



lalks Dack 




Max Baer has become King of Hearts since movie-goeis have thrilled to his performance in "The Prizefighter 
and the Lady." Here Max is shown in a scene from the picture, with Myrna Loy and Otto Kruger 'left) 



THE $25 LETTER 

My day as secretary in the office of two busy 
doctors goes something like this — a continual 
rushing from one telephone to another, answer- 
ing frantic calls: "No, sir, this is not the 
morgue." " No, madam, I wouldn't advise you 
to feed your two months' old baby pork and 
beans." Etc., etc. 

Comes six o'clock. Faint buzzing in my ears. 
Furniture seems to be moving of its own 
accord. Diagnosis — on-coming hysteria. Cure 
— no, not pills. Quickly grabbing the evening 
newspaper, I turn frantically to theatrical 
news. Glad tidings of great joy! Now playing 
at my favorite theater is a movie I've been 
waiting long to see. What luck! 

Zip! off comes my uniform. Click! out go 
the office lights. Bang goes the door. I'm on 
my way to a sure cure for the blues. 

Helen M. Annand, Vancouver, B. C. 

THE $10 LETTER 

Pish! Then a couple of pishes! Will the 
human lemon drops, crab apples, and vinegar 
jugs of this old world transform their "contract 
hearts" into "contrite hearts" and stop mutter- 
ing that youth is going to the bow-wows ? 
In fact, youth is making an exit from the 
kennels. 

Don't think the two hundred "teen types" 
who daily come to my classes are saving their 
pennies to see pictures filled with blood and 
thunder, sex and machine guns. No indeed, 
they save for such films as "Little Women" 
and "Alice in Wonderland." 

This era of clean movies is having its effect 

8 



This month has brought a 
veritable avalanche of mail 
commending those two fine 
photoplays, "Little Women" 
and "Only Yesterday." Limited 
space permits our publishing 
but a few of these complimen- 
tary messages. 

There are many new nomi- 
nations for "Hollywood's Ideal 
Couple," as well as dozens of 
votes for those already named. 
Who are your candidates? 

Several readers have expressed 
a desire to see the Gaynor-Far- 
rell team together again on the 
screen. These folks will be 
pleased to know that Janet and 
Charlie are now at work on the 
film, "Sun Shines Bright." 

From others come the sug- 
gestion that producers film 
popular operettas. 



When the audience speaks the stars and 
producers listen. We offer three prizes for 
the best letters of the month— $25, $10 and 
$5. Literary ability doesn't count. But 
candid opinions and constructive sugges- 
tions do. We must reserve the right to cut 
letters to fit space limitations. Address The 
Editor, PHOTOPLAY, 221 W. 57th St., 
New York City. 



upon youth's taste for good literature and, if 
it continues, will have a marked effect upon the 
upward trend of American literature. 

Karla Vance, Newark, Ohio 

THE $5 LETTER 

The high school which I now attend 

Is full of movie stars! 
New brilliant finds, like Anna Sten. 

No Barbara La Marrs! 

Lee Tracy throws his arms about, 

The campus knows his vim. 
Mae West? She wiggles in and out 

From study hall to gym. 

The Barrymores? You'll find them down 

In classroom one one, 
The way they pop their eyes and frown 

Would make Schenck say, "Well done!" 

Our Laughton's getting rather slim 

For old King Henry's clothes. 
Clark Gable? Well, we've three of him, 

And eight or ten Garbos. 

Jim Boothe, Sweetwater, Texas 

MAXIE SCORES A KNOCKOUT 

In "The Prizefighter and the Lady," Max 
Baer gave one of the best screen performances 
I have ever seen, and considering the fact that 
he is an amateur, that's saying a lot. 

Otto Kruger also deserves much credit. In 
fact, the whole thing was superbly written, 
directed and acted. 

[ please turn to pace 12 ] 



Photoplay Magazine for March, 1934 




"THE SCARLET EMPRESS" 

(Based on a private diary of Catherine the Great) 

directed by JOSEF VON STERNBERG 
A PARAM0UN T PICTURE 






Consult this pic- 
ture shopping 
guide and save 
your time, money 
and disposition 



Brief R 



e views o 



r 



C^urrent Pictures 



-^ Indicates photoplay was named as one of the best upon its month of review 



ACE OF ACES— RKO-Radio — Richard Dix in a 
not-so-hot wartime aviation story. {Dec.) 

ADVICE TO THE LOVELORN— 20th Century- 
United Artists. — As punishment for neglect of his job 
as reporter, Lee Tracy is made "Miss Lonelyhearts" 
editor of the newspaper. Sally Blane, Isabel Jewell, 
Sterling Holloway, C. Henry Gordon lend able 
support. Fair. (Feb.) 

AFTER TONIGHT— RKO-Radio.— Connie Ben- 
nett's a Russian spy in love with Austrian officer 
Gilbert Roland; fast, exciting. (Dec.) 

AGGIE APPLEBY, MAKER OF MEN— RKO- 
Radio. — Country-boy Charles Farrell is made into a 
tough mug by bad-lady Wynne Gibson. Bill Gargan. 
You'll laugh and like it. (Dec.) 

• ALICE IN WONDERLAND— Paramount.— 
Lewis Carroll's fairy tale filmed for the amuse- 
ment of both young and old. Charlotte Henry is 
charming as Alice. A technical achievement. (Feb.) 

ANN CARVER'S PROFESSION— Columbia.— 
Fay Wray shows her competence aside from horror 
stuff, as a successful lawyer married to Gene Ray- 
mond. Gene gets into trouble; Fay must save him. 
Acceptable entertainment. (Sept.) 

• ANN VICKERS— RKO-Radio.— Irene Dunne 
in a finely acted tale of a social worker who 
loves but doesn't marry. Walter Huston, Bruce 
Cabot. Strictly for sophisticates. (Dec.) 

• ANOTHER LANGUAGE — M-G-M. — A 
slow-moving but superbly acted story of a bride 
(Helen Hayes) misunderstood by the family of hubby 
Bob Montgomery. The late Louise Closser Hale 
plays the dominating mother. (Oct.) 

ARIZONA TO BROADWAY— Fox.— Joan Ben- 
nett, Jimmie Dunn, and a good cast, wasted in a 
would-be adventure yarn about slicking the slickers. 
(Sept.) 

AS HUSBANDS GO— Fox.— When wife Helen 
Vinson is followed home from Europe by admirer 
G. P. Huntley, Jr., husband Warner Baxter takes him 
out fishing, and straightens things out. Mediocre. 
(Feb.) 

AVENGER, THE — Monogram. — Adrienne Ames 
and Ralph Forbes wasted on this one. (Dec.) 

BEAUTY FOR SALE— M-G-M.— An amusing 
tale about the troubles of girls who work in a beauty 
shop. Una Merkel, Alice Brady, Madge Evans, 
Hedda Hopper, others. ( Nov.) 

BEFORE DAWN— RKO-Radio.— Dorothy Wilson, 
a spiritualist, tries to help detective Stuart Erwin 
solve a murder mystery — in a haunted house! Not 
for the kiddies. (Jan.) 

• BELOVED — Universal. — The story of a com- 
poser's life. His poverty, his disappointment 
in a worthless son, his scorn of grandson's modern 
musical triumphs, his great love for his wife, and his 
belated success. John Boles, Gloria Stuart. (Feb.) 

• BERKELEY SQUARE— Fox.— As subtly 
done as "Smilin' Through"; Leslie Howard 
thrown back among his 18th century ancestors. 
Heather Angel. (Sept.) 

BEST OF ENEMIES— Fox.— No great comeback 
for Buddy Rogers; he and Marian Nixon reconcile 
quarreling papas Frank Morgan and Joseph Caw- 
thorn. (Sept.) 

10 



BIG EXECUTIVE— Paramount.— Ricardo Cor- 
tez, Richard Bennett, Elizabeth Young, wasted in 
another of these stock market tales. Weak story. 
(Oct.) 

BIG SHAKEDOWN, THE— First National.— 
Ricardo Cortez forces Charles Farrell into cut-rate 
drug racket but when a fake drug kills Charlie's 
and Bette Davis' baby, then Charlie retaliates. 
A poor film. (Feb.) 

BIG TIME OR BUST— Tower Prod.— Regis 
Toomey and Walter Byron try hard, but to no 
avail. However, the good singing voice in the film 
may make you forget the old plot. (Feb.) 



BITTER SWEET— United Artists.— A British 
musical, about a woman musician who lives on after 
her husband was killed defending her honor. It could 
have been stronger. (Nov.) 



BLARNEY KISS, THE— British & Dominions.— 
British restraint takes zip from this tale of an Irish- 
man who kisses the Blarney Stone, and then has great 
adventures in London. Well acted. ( Nov.) 



STYLES 

that are new! 

Turn to Seymour's 
famous fashions 
on page 61 of this 
issue for latest 
designs and 
accessories 



BLIND ADVENTURE — RKO-Radio. — Ad- 
venturous Bob Armstrong tangled with Helen Mack, 
crooks, and a jovial burglar, Roland Young, in a 
London fog. But the plot is as badly befogged as the 
characters. (Oct.) 



• BLONDE BOMBSHELL, THE— M-G-M.— 
(Reviewed under the title "Bombshell.") Jean 
Harlow superb in an uproarious comedy of Hollywood 
life. Press-agent Lee Tracy makes her the hot 
"Bombshell "; she wants to lead the simple life. (Dec.) 



BLOOD MONEY— 20th Century-United Artists. 
— Underworld bail bondsman George Bancroft falls 
in love with pretty Frances Dee and deserts his 
gangster friends who made him. Good suspense. 
(Jan.) 



BOMBAY MAIL— Universal.— Murder aboard 
the Bombay Mail train. Inspector Edmund Lowe 
solves the mystery. The large cast includes Shirley 
Grey and Onslow Stevens. Good suspense. (Feb.) 

• BOWERY, THE — 20th Century-United 
Artists. — Grand fun while Wally Beery as 
Chuck Connors and George Raft as Steve Brodic 
battle for leadership of the Bowery in old days. 
Jackie Cooper, Fay Wray. Don't miss it. (Dec.) 

BRIEF MOMENT — Columbia.— Night club 
singer Carole Lombard marries playboy Gene Ray- 
mond to reform him. It has snap and speed. (Nov.) 

BROADWAY THRU A KEYHOLE— 20th Cen- 
tury-United Artists. — Walter Winchell's melodrama 
of Gay White Way night life. Entertaining. (Dec.) 

• BROADWAY TO HOLLYWOOD— M-G-M. 
— Frank Morgan, Alice Brady, others, in a 
finely-done life story of two vaudeville hoofers. No 
thrills, but supreme artistry. (Nov.) 

BROKEN DREAMS — Monogram. — Buster 
Phelps shows how a little child can lead them; it's 
slightly hokey. (Dec.) 

BUREAU OF MISSING PERSONS— First Nal 

tional. — Good, stirring detective work by hard-boiled 
Pat O'Brien, directed by chief Lewis Stone. Bette 
Davis. ( Nov.) 

BY CANDLELIGHT— Universal.— A well-direct- 
ed piece about butler Paul Lukas and ladies' maid 
Elissa Landi who aspire to have an affair with royalty. 
They meet, each masquerading, only to learn the 
truth later. Nils Asther. (Feb.) 

CAPTURED!— Warners.— Leslie Howard, Doug 
Fairbanks, Jr., captured aviators held by prison 
commander Paul Lukas. Fine acting; weak plot. 
(Sept.) 

CHANCE AT HEAVEN— RKO-Radio.— "Poor 
but noble" Ginger Rogers and rich Marian Nixon 
want Joel McCrea. Excellent playing makes this old 
plot highly appealing. (Dec.) 

CHARLIE CHAN'S GREATEST CASE— Fox. 

—Warner Oland in another delightful tale about the 
fat Chinese detective, and a double murder. Heather 
Angel. (Nov.) 

CHIEF, THE— M-G-M.— Ed Wynn in a filmful of 
his nonsense that's good at times and at others not so 
good. (Dec.) 

CHRISTOPHER BEAN (Also released as "Her 
Sweetheart") — ■ M-G-M. — Marie Dressier, Doc 
Lionel Barrymore's maid, gives you plenty of laughs 
when she helps daughter Helen Mack elope with 
Russell Hardie, much to the annoyance of Beulah 
Bondi, doctor's wife. See it. (Jan.) 

COLLEGE COACH— Warners.— Football as it 
is played and won by coach Pat O'Brien who buys 
talent to win at all costs, while Ann Dvorak, his 
neglected wife, finds romance with Lyle Talbot, 
football hero. Fast moving. (Jan.) 

COLLEGE HUMOR— Paramount.— Regulation 
movie college life. Jack Oakie as hero. Bing Crosby; 
Burns and Allen, Richard Arlen, Mary Kornman, 
good enough. (Sept.) 

• CONVENTION CITY— First National.— The 
scene is Atlantic City; the incident, another 
sales convention. Gay and eventful as always. 
Joan Blondell, Adolphe Menjou, Dick Powell, Mary 
Astor, Guy Kibbee, Frank McHugh and Patricia 
Ellis. (Feb.) 

[ PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 13 ] 



Photoplay Magazine tor March, 1934 



I I 



\ 



YOU'LL SEE TWO CONSTANCE BENNETTS . . . 



in this intoxicating, spectacular 
romance icitli music! . . . the 
\^onnie you 're alwaps loved—' 
blonde and enticing ... /\nd 
a new (^.onnie • — brunette f 
seductive and ravishing ! . . . 
teamed icith t r an c ho I 
lone to create the perfect 



lovers oj ill 



xe screen , 




20* 

CENTURY 
PICTURE 

A DARRYL F. ZANUCK Production 



TULLIO CARMINATI 
RUSS COLUMBO 

BOSWELL SISTERS 

Directed by Sidney Lanfield 
cased thru UNITED ARTISTS 



B 



rickbats & 



B 




" She's a testimony to the triumph of Real Worth," is what one reader 
says about petite little Mary Pickford, Sweetheart of all America 



[ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 8 ] 

If one could get a story, direction and acting 
as good as this in more pictures, it would 
be worth while visiting the movies more 
often. 

Kermit Lasch, Elkhorn, Wis. 

AND SO DOES OTTO 

Ladies and gentlemen! Did you see "The 
Prizefighter and the Lady," and Otto Kntger? 
What an actor! Star material of the first 
caliber. 

J. Wasso, Jr., Pen Argyl, Penna. 

HEAR YE, PRODUCERS! 

As the tide of time sweeps by taking romance, 
youth and possessions, we old folks experience 
much poignance and loneliness. Friends are 
scattered and memories dimmed. 

At the movies I sit and watch the few Gay 
Nineties pictures there are. They seem to bring 
back memories of childhood. Please let's have 
more Gay Nineties pictures. 

H. B., Los Angeles, Calif. 

LEAD ON, PHOTOPLAY 

The candid comments of Photoplay's ca- 
pable reviewers steer me away from the 
"lemons" and lead me to the best that Holly- 
wood produces. 

Keep up the good work! 
Clayton H. Charles Jr., Milwaukee, Wis. 

12 



TO MARY PICKFORD 

Though the roses are faded and falling 
And the candles have guttered and died, 
Though the silver is nothing but tinsel 
And the tears on your cheek are scarce dried; 

Though the beautiful home is in darkness 
And its inmates are scattered and gone, 
Though love folded his arms, like the Arabs 
And fled, like the mist in the dawn; 

We love you, we beg you'll believe it 
We have faith that after a while 
You'll come as of yore and still give us 
The sweetness and charm of your smile. 
Frances G. Quinn, Los Angeles, Calif. 

THROUGH THE YEARS 

Each day, as I drive my husband down the 
imposing thoroughfare that winds from the 
Parliament Buildings to the heart of the city's 
business section, I salute a tiny house. 

It has known happiness. It has known sor- 
row. It has seen the middle-class, pleasant 
street change to the widest, busiest motor- 
driveway in town. It has just missed the 
wreckers many times but still it stands, daunt- 
less, dignified, boarded-up, empty but serene — 
seeing changes, experiencing changes, but 
never cheapened by them. 

It is on University Avenue, Toronto, 
Canada, the house where the little Canadian 
girl, Gladys Smith, lived before she became 
Mary Pickford, America's Sweetheart. 



o u q u e t s 



The little house stands, as the magnificent 
Mary does, a silent testimony to the triumph 
of Real Worth. 

Rica M. Farquharson, Toronto, Canada 

A PERFECT OUTLET 

All of us, at one time or another, feel that 
everything is wrong, and we want to scream 
loudly, swear violently, kick doors or throw 
things. 

It was just such a day for me when I went to 
see "Only Yesterday." Result — I cried quite 
freely throughout most of the picture. I know 
of no saner, safer way as an outlet for tense 
nerves. It soothes and calms. One's own 
troubles seem small in comparison. 

Most women enjoy a good cry scattered 
along between "Footlight Parades" and "I'm 
No Angels." 

Patricia Rogers, Santa Barbara, Calif. 

TRULY AN ARTIST 

After having seen the marvelous drama, 
"Only Yesterday," starring Margaret Sul- 
lavan, one cannot help but love her. She is an 
artist; she is graceful and alluring. The story 
digs down deep into one's heart. 

One feels like shouting to her: "Tell him 
who you are. Tell him how you have suffered 
— how you have loved him," but our better 
self says: " She was right; he should have known 
her." 

W. M. Hunt, Montebello, Calif. 

MAIN ST. ON SATURDAY NIGHT 

Let's take a look at the long line of cars on 
Main Street on Saturday night. 

Those cars are waiting for Mr. and Mrs. 
Farmer who are enjoying two magic hours of 
travel in strange lands, of laughter and of tears. 

Is it any wonder that the farmer's wife, thus 
brought in touch with the lives and problems 
of the rest of the world, feels not quite so 
lonely now? 

Frances Galwey, Pasadena, Calif. 

A NEW NOMINATION 

I wish to cast my vote for Norma Shearer 
and Irving Thalberg as "Hollywood's Ideal 
Couple." 

They lead a simple, quiet life, and are fond 
of their home and child. 

In spite of great success, they are unaffected. 
I believe they have found everlasting happi- 
ness. 

Betty Seay, Indianapolis, Ind. 

THE LLOYDS ARE ON TOP 

Our bridge club meets once a month and, as 
is customary with a modern group of girls, at 
some time during the evening conversation 
turns to movie folk and Hollywood news. 

At our last meeting, we decided to take time 
out to cast our votes for "Hollywood's Ideal 
Couple." 

Here is the result: 

3 for Joan Bennett and Gene Markey 
1 for Ruby Keeler and Al Jolson 

4 for the Fredric Marches 
1 for the Warner Baxters 
6 for the Harold Lloyds 

1 for the Richard Barthelmesses 

Ruth Mayer, Indianapolis, Ind. 

DELICATELY BEAUTIFUL 

Paramount deserves high praise for its beau- 
tiful and artistic production, "Cradle Song." 
[ please turn to page 14 ] 



Photoplay Magazine for March, 1934 



Brief Reviews of 
Current Pictures 

[ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 10 ] 



• COUNSELLOR-AT-LAW— Universal— John 
Barrymore, in a splendid portrayal of the 
lawyer who rose from the Ghetto to position of New 
York's foremost legal advisor. Bebe Daniels, as his 
secretary, is excellent. Each member of the large 
cast does fine work. Never a dull moment. {Feb.) 

CRADLE SONG— Paramount.— Just as charm- 
ing is Dorothea Wieck in this her first American 
picture as she was in "Maedchen in Uniform." 
The beautiful story of a nun who showers mother- 
love on a foundling. {Jan.) 

DANCE, GIRL, DANCE— Invincible.— Dancer 
Evalyn Knapp can't get along with vaudeville 
partner-husband Edward Nugent. But when she 
clicks in a night club, they make up. Entertaining. 
(Jan.) 

• DANCING LADY— M-G-M — A backstage 
musical with gorgeous settings, lovely girls, 
novel dance routines, some good song numbers, a 
real plot and a cast of winners, including Joan Craw- 
ford, Clark Gable, Franchot Tone, Fred Astaire. 
(Feb.) 

DANGEROUS CROSSROADS— Columbia — 

Chic Sale does the locomotive engineer in a railroad 
thriller. For confirmed hokum addicts and Chic 
bale's followers. (Sept.) 

DARK HAZARD— First National.— Fascinated 
by a greyhound named Dark Hazard and by the 
racing fever, Eddie Robinson loses wife Genevieve 
Tobin through neglect. Grand night scenes at the 
dog track. (Feb.) 

DAS LOCKENDE ZIEL (THE GOLDEN 

GOAD— Richard Tauber Tonfilm Prod.— Richard 
Tauber, as village choir singer who attains grand 
opera fame. His singing is superb. English captions. 
(Sept.) 

DAY OF RECKONING, THE— M-G-M.— 
Richard Dix, Madge Evans, Conway Tearle, below 
par in an ancient tale of an embezzling cashier and a 
double-crossing friend. (Dec.) 

DELUGE — RKO- Radio.— Earthquakes, tidal 
waves, the end of the world provide the thrills here. 
Cast and story alike dwarfed by the catastrophes. 
( -Vo».) 

DER SOHN DER WEISSEN BERGE (THE 
SON OF THE WHITE MOUNTAINS)— Itala 
Film. — Luis Trenker, skiing hero, and cast do good 
work. But the gorgeous Alpine views run away with 
this German-made film. (Jan.) 

• DESIGN FOR LIVING — Paramount.— Noel 
Coward's unconventional stage play of a 
triangle, involving two men (Fredric March and 
Gary Cooper) and a woman (Miriam Hopkins). 
Excellent. Sophisticated. (Jan.) 

DEVIL'S IN LOVE, THE— Fox.— A shopworn 
Foreign Legion story; but Victor Jory, Loretta Young, 
David Manners, Vivienne Osborne, save it with fine 
acting. (Oct.) 

DEVIL'S MATE— (Also released under title "He 
Knew Too Much") — Monogram. — A good melo- 
drama about a murderer who was murdered so he 
couldn't tell what he knew. (Oct.) 

DIE GROSSE ATTRAKTION ("THE BIG 
ATTRACTION")— Tobis-Tauber-Emelka. Prod.— 
Richard Tauber's singing lends interest to this Ger- 
man film. English subtitles. (Oct.) 



DISGRACED — Paramount. — Not a new idea in 
a carload of this sort of stuff. Mannikin Helen 
Twelvetrees; rich scamp Bruce Cabot; enough said. 
(Sept.) 



DOCTOR BULL— Fox.— Will Rogers brings per- 
sonality to the tale of a country doctor struggling 
with a community that misunderstands; mild, except 
for Will. ( Nov.) 



DON'T BET ON LOVE— Universal.— So-so; 
Lew Ayres wild about race-horses; sweetheart Ginger 
Rogers feels otherwise. Ends well, after some race 
stuff. (Sept.) 



• DOUBLE HARNESS— RKO- Radio.— Scintil- 
lating sophistication, with Ann Harding wan- 
gling rich idler Bill Powell into marriage, and mak- 
ing him like it. (Sept.) 

[ PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 16 ] 




Before the white man 
came, tooth decay was 
unknown. Now the 
Eskimo eats the wrong 
foods, doesn 't clean his 
teeth, has civilized 
habits, and pays the 
penalty with poor teeth 




An uncivilised African 
who files her teeth to pin 
points for beauty** sake. 



BEFORE he ate 
the soft, 
starchy foods of 
civilization, tooth- 
ache was unknown 
to the oldest 
Eskimo, unless 
perhaps he had broken off a tooth by acci- 
dent. Then the toothache of civilized races 
began to appear. It was found to result 
from common tooth decay. 

Now dental science explains the cause of 
tooth decay in this way: Modern diet con- 
sists largely of soft, sticky foods. After eat- 
ing, particles of food cling between the 
teeth and under the gums. Germs cause this 
food to spoil or decay. As food decays, acids 
are given off which decay or dissolve the 
tooth enamel. Once through enamel decay 
progressesrapidly until the nerve is reached 
and the entire tooth is undermined. 

Not one person in ten thousand has 
teeth hard enough to resist the acids which 
cause decay. These acids are produced by 
germs. The germs live and multiply in a 
coating of film or mucin plaque, which 
forms on teeth. Film is tough and clings 
stubbornly to teeth. It catches the acid- 
producing germs and glues them XR 
to the tooth surfaces. 

Removing film is, therefore, the 



(Left) The modern Eskimo nfter a 
half century of civilization 's luxuries. 



most important problem in 
saving teeth. Recently a no- 
table discovery was made 
in the Pepsodent labora- 
tories. It is a revolutionary 
cleansing material. The 
cleansing and polishing 
material is the part of any 
tooth paste that does the 
work. Herein lies the dif- 
ference between the New 
Pepsodent and ordinary brands. 

Most cleansing materials are either so 
hard and abrasive that they scratch the 
tooth enamel or else they are so soft that 
they fail to remove film and stains. 
Pepsodent's new material is twice as soft 
as that commonly used in other tooth 
pastes, yet it is also remarkably effective 
in removing film. 



FREE— 10-Day Tube 




THE PEPSODENT CO., Dept. 113, 

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Mail 10-Day Tube of Pepsodent to 

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Send In Your Reactions 




[ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 12 ] 

Followers of the legitimate theater, and 
students of the drama viewed with consider- 
able apprehension the prospect of seeing 
Martinez Sierra's exquisite play transformed 
into a motion picture. 

" Cradle Song" was directed with a sensitive- 
ness that is all too rare in the art of motion 
pictures. 

As Sister Joanna, Dorothea Wieck more than 
fulfills all expectations. 

F. E. Brenon, Brentwood Heights, Calif. 

I had the supreme pleasure of attending 
Dorothea Wieck's "Cradle Song." It is the 
loveliest thing I have ever seen portrayed on 
the screen. Miss Wieck is an artist and I hope 
we will be favored with many pictures by her, 
as touching and beautiful. 

Mary S., New York, N. Y. 

SO SHALL IT BE 

How about another G^ynor-Farrell film back 
to the "7th Heaven," "Street Angel" era, 
since drawing-room films are draggy and gay 

u 



Commendations 
are showering in on 
the dazzling, spec- 
tacular film, 
"Dancing Lady," 
and on the lovely 
Joan Crawford, who 
is teamed with 
lithe Fred Astaire 
in the brilliant 
dance numbers 



Dorothea Wieck's 
delicate beauty and 
her dramatic talent, 
displayed in 
"Cradle Song," her 
first film in Amer- 
ica, have won the 
hearts of motion 
picture audiences 
all over the country 



husband, beautiful siren and neglected wife 
parts are almost passe? Let's have more fresh, 
sparkling films with the vivacious Janet and 
heroic Charlie. 

Ed Kesner, Cleveland, Ohio 

STAGGERING— STUPENDOUS 

"Dancing Lady" towers to new heights in 
screen musical entertainment. A smashing 
parade of song hits. 

Here is the Joan Crawford of old — the Craw- 
ford who stampedes the box-office. Teamed 
once more with Gable, Joan plays her chorus 
role with all she's got. When she dances — 
with Fred Astaire — well, she dances! 
Mrs. Charles Toles, 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

DANCING OFF THE POUNDS 

After seeing a grand picture like "Dancing 
Lady," I catch myself tap dancing about my 
work and making the firmest resolutions to be- 
come as slender and graceful as Joan Crawford. 
Dorothy Carmack, No. Little Rock, Ark. 

OPERETTAS 

The lilting tunes of "Blossom Time," 
"Naughty Marietta, "The Chocolate Soldier," 
" My Maryland" and " Mademoiselle Modiste" 
still linger in my mind as pleasant memories. 
Why not bring these to the screen? Surely 
their oft-repeated renditions on the air attest 
to their eternal popularity! 

May I nominate John Boles as the outstand- 
ing choice for these musicals. He proved his 
ability for this type of role by his success in the 
popular " Desert Song." 
Catherine Weyant, Philadelphia, Penna. 

YES, WHO? 

If you were to select one star from all of 
Hollywood's brilliant assemblage, one person 




On Every Film You See 



whom you would want to know intimately and 
call your friend, who would that person be? 

To me, Katharine Hepburn is all I should 
want in a friend. Loyal, considerate, a great 
personality, eager, full of warmth, a sense of 
humor — these and others are Katharine's at- 
tributes, which, reflected from the screen, 
qualify her as a true friend. She is human and 
real and clever — and above all sincere. What 
more could one ask for? 

Virginia Wentz, Portland, Ore. 

AS WE KNEW THEM 

To those of us who have read, reread and 
loved "Little Women," the picture gave 
actuality to our inward visions of those char- 
acters. 

The quieting and sweetening of tomboy Jo, 
portrayed by Katharine Hepburn, was one of 
the details that made the girls real people 
rather than dream girls. 

Louisa M. Alcott, as well as all the girls who 
have loved her story, would feel that her Jo 
and all the March family had truly come to 
life. 

Marjorie Vachon, Stockton, Calif. 

MUCH MORE, INDEED 

"Little Women" is more than a two-hand- 
kerchief sob picture; it is life, and truth, and 
beauty. What if the locale and atmosphere 
are those of sixty years ago? The American 
people, for all their jazz and riotous pace, still 
idealize simplicity. 

Daniel Masta, Portland, Me. 

NATURALLY! 

I could rave on forever about Ann Harding, 
who is undoubtedly the most unique type of 
actress on the screen today. I like everything 
in which she has ever played. Have just seen 
"The Right to Romance," which I thoroughly 
enjoyed. 



Vj 



■ 







"**&&* 



M B 



J 




Her low voice, her 
frank manner, and 
her naturalness en- 
dear Ann Harding 
to the movie-going 
public. Notes keep 
coming in about 
her excellent work 
in "The Right to 
Romance," with 
Nils Asther 



One film devotee 
would choose as a 
friend Katharine 
Hepburn in prefer- 
ence to anyone else, 
if she were to make 
her selection from 
the vast Hollywood 
assemblage. What 
say you about it? 



To me, Ann is ethereal, and her low vcice is 
fascinating. She seems to say the right thing, 
in the right tone, and uses words that are plain 
and frank, yet the natural thing to say. 

Elcy Oberdick, Leavenworth, Kansas 

REFRESHING MEMORIES 

This is just a word of thanks for your inter- 
esting work from a great enthusiast of your 
publication in far-away Poland. 

I left the United States six years ago, but 
have not missed a single copy of Photoplay 
since. I like Poland very much and Warsaw is 
a jolly city, a sort of "petite Paris," still there 
are times when I long for familiar sights in 
Uncle Sam's country. Then I turn to the 
movies for comfort. 

Mrs. A. Drzewiecki, Warsaw, Poland 

DON'T WORRY, WE HAVEN'T 

I live in dread from one month to the next 
that the department "Casts of Current Photo- 
plays" will be discontinued. I trust you have 
no intention of dropping this feature. 

Vernon Lowe, Los Angeles, Calif. 

15 



Brief Reviews of Current Pictures 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 13 ] 



• DUCK SOUP— Paramount.— The Four Marx 
Brothers get mixed up in a revolution in a 
mythical country — and boy, how they get mixed up! 
A riot of fun. (Jan.) 

EAST OF FIFTH AVENUE— Columbia.— Melo- 
drama centering around the lives of ten people who 
live in a cheap New York rooming house. Dorothy 
Tree, Mary Carlisle, Walter Connolly and Wallace 
Ford. Just fair. (Feb.) 

EASY MILLIONS— Freuler Film.— A fine mix-up 
when "Skeets" Gallagher finds himself engaged to 
three girls at the same time. Johnny Arthur is his 
professorish roommate. Good supporting cast. (Feb.) 

EAT 'EM ALIVE— Real Life Pictures.— A nature 
drama about snakes and gila monsters. Perhaps a 
bit too gruesome for women and children. (Feb.) 

EMPEROR JONES, THE United Artists.— 

The great Negro ai tor Paul Robeson, in a filming of 
his phenomen 1 stage success about a Pullman porter 
who won rulership of a Negro republic. (Dei.) 

ESKIMO — M-G-M. — A gorgeous picture of life in 
the Arctic, and Eskimos tangling with white man's 
law. Eskimo actors; a treat for all who like the un- 
usual. (Dec.) 

EVER IN MY HEART- Warners.— Barbara 
Stanwyck in a too-horrible tale about persecution of 
herself and hubby Otto Kruger as German-Americans 
during the World War. (Dec.) 

FAITHFUL HEART— Helber Pictures.— Not 
even Herbert Marshall and Edna Best could make 
anything of this. ( Nov.) 

FAREWELL TO LOVE— Associated Sound Film. 
— Especially for those who enjoy Italian opera airs. 
Jan ICiepura, tenor, and Heather Angel do the best 
possible with their roles. (Feb.) 

FEMALE— First National.— Ruth Chatterton, 
who toys with men in her own motor company, melts 
before George Brent. Chatterton fine. (Jan.) 

FIDDLIN' BUCKAROO, THE— Universal— Ken 
Maynard and horse Tarzan in a dull Western. (Sept.) 

FIGHTING PARSON, THE— Allied-First Divi- 
sion. — Hoot Gibson tries comedy, as a cowboy be- 
decked in the garb of a parson. Not exactly a comic 
riot, nor is it good Western. (Oct.) 

• FOOTLIGHT PARADE— Warners.— Not as 
much heart appeal as the earlier Ruby Keeler- 
Dick Powell "backstage" romances, but it has Jimmy 
Cagney. He's grand, and the specialty numbers are 
among the finest ever done. (Dec.) 

F. P. 1.— Fox-Gaumont British-UFA. — A well- 
done and novel thriller, about a floating platform 
built for transatlantic airplanes. Conrad Veidt, 
Leslie Fenton, Jill Esmond. (Oct.) 

FROM HEADQUARTERS— Warners.— A grip- 
ping murder mystery, showing real police methods for 
a change. (Dec.) 



FRONTIER MARSHAL— Fox.— George O'Brien 
as a "dude" marshal in a Western town. Ruth 
Gillette does a Mae West impersonation. Well 
w ml h your time. (Feb.) 

• GALLANT LADY— 20th Century-United 
Artists. — As the gallant lady in distress, Ann 
Harding does such fine work that even Clive Brook's 
exceptional characterization as a social outcast can- 
not overshadow her performance. Tullio Carminati, 
Otto Kruger, Dickie Moore, Betty Lawford. (Feb.) 

GIRL WITHOUT A ROOM— Paramount- 
Charles Farrell, Marguerite Churchill and Charlie 
Ruggles in a picture that kids the pseudo-art racket 
in Paris. Light entertainment. (Feb.) 

GOLDEN HARVEST — Paramount. — Farmer 
Dick Arlen grows wheat; brother Chester Morris is a 
Board of Trade broker; a farmers' strike brings the 
climax. A strong film. (Dec.) 

GOOD COMPANIONS, THE— Fox-Gaumont- 
British. — A mildly pleasing English tale of trouping 
in the provinces. (Dec.) 

GOODBYE AGAIN— Warners.— Good, if not 
howling, farce. Author Warren William pursued by 
ex-sweetie Genevieve Tobin; he's for Joan Blondell. 
(Sept.) 

GOODBYE LOVE — RKO-Radio. — Charlie 
Ruggles in a would-be comedy that's really a messy 
mixture of unsavory material. (Dec.) 

GUN JUSTICE — Universal. (Reviewed under 
the title "Rider of Justice.") — Ken Maynard shows 
up in the nick of time to save the pretty girls ranch 
in Arizona. The same old hokum. (Jan.) 

• HAVANA WIDOWS— First National.— Joan 
Blondell, Glenda Farrell and Guy Kibbee in a 
rollicking comedy. A climax that will tickle your 
risibilities. Good fun. (Jan.) 

HE KNEW TOO MUCH— Monogram— Also re- 
leased as "Devil's Mate." See review under that 
title. (Oct.) 

HEADLINE SHOOTER— RKO-Radio.— News- 
reel man William Gargan rescues reporter Frances 
Dee, in an acceptable thriller with a new twist. 
(Sept.) 

HE COULDN'T TAKE IT— Monogram.— Pals 
Ray Walker and George E. Stone get mixed up with 
gangsters in a highly amusing comedy concoction. 
Virginia Chernll. (Feb.) 

HELL AND HIGH WATER— Parmount— Dick 
Arlen, owner of a garbage scow, falls heir to a baby 
and a girl (Judith Allen) at the same time. Dick 
fine; story poor. (Jan.) 

HELL'S HOLIDAY— Superb Pictures.— Another 
assemblage of official war film — with the usual anti- 
war conversation added. Otherwise, acceptable and 
interesting. (Oct.) 



HER BODYGUARD— Paramount— Showgirl 
Wynne Gibson's so pestered, she hires Eddie Lowe 
as bodyguard. Good enough fun from there on. 
(Sept.) 

• HER FIRST MATE— Universal.— ZaSu Pitts 
tries to make a big time mariner out of Slim 
Summerville who's supposed to be first mate, but 
who is really selling peanuts, on the Albany night 
boat. Una Merkel helps scramble up the hilariously 
funny plot. (Oct.) 

HER SPLENDID FOLLY— Hollywood Pictures. 
— Generally speaking, this is pretty poor. Lilian 
Bond plays the role of double for a movie star. 
Alexander Carr is a producer. (Feb.) 

HIS PRIVATE SECRETARY— Showmens Pic- 
tures. — An Evalyn Knapp romance with John Wayne. 
Distinctly better than most films in which Evalyn 
has appeared. (Oct.) 

HOLD THE PRESS— Columbia.— This time 
Tim McCoy is a newspaper man. He has exciting 
times trying to expose a group of racketeers, and in 
the end he does. Good suspense. (Feb.) 

• HOLD YOUR MAN— M-G-M.— Clark Gable 
and Jean Harlow; both crooked to start, both 
go straight for love. Not another "Red Dust," but 
good enough. (Sept.) 

HOOPLA — Fox. — Clara Bow as a carnival dancer. 
Love interest, Richard Cromwell, whom Clara is 
paid to vamp — and does she like it? Story so-so. 
(Jan.) 

HORSE PLAY— Universal.— Cowboys Slim Sum- 
merville and Andy Devine go to England with a 
million dollars, just in time to save pretty Leila 
Hyams from jewel thieves. Just so-so. (Feb.) 

• HOUSE ON 56TH STREET, THE— Warn- 
ers. — After twenty years' unjust imprison- 
ment, Kay Francis' life means little to her. Then it 
is her lot to save daughter Margaret Lindsay from 
a similar fate. Ricardo Cortez and Gene Raymond. 
(Jan.) 

IF I WERE FREE— RKO-Radio.— Irene Dunne 
and Clive Brook, both unhappily married, turn to 
each other for a bit of happiness. Familiar plot, but 
sophisticated, clever dialogue. Nils Asther, Laura 
Hope Crews. (Feb.) 

I HAVE LIVED— Chesterfield.— Alan Dinehart, 
Anita Page, others, help this obvious tale about a 
playwright and a woman of easy virtue. ( Nov.) 

*I LOVED A WOMAN-First National.-Ed- 
ward G. Robinson, as a rich Chicago meat- 
packer, finds his life torn between wife Genevieve 
Tobin and opera singer Kay Francis. Excellent and 
"different.'' (Nov.) 

I LOVED YOU WEDNESDAY— Fox.— Life and 

loves of dancer Elissa Landi. Victor Jory throws her 
over; Warner Baxter loves her. Pleasant; not grip- 
ping. (Sept.) 



Photoplays Reviewed in the Shadow Stage This Issue 

Save this magazine — refer to the criticisms before you pic\ out your evening's entertainment. Ma\e this your reference list. 



Page 

Above the Clouds — Columbia 58 

All of Me — Paramount 58 

Charming Deceiver, The — Majestic Pic- 
tures 103 

Criminal at Large — Helber Pictures. . . 103 

Cross Country Cruise — Universal 58 

Dawn to Dawn — Cameron MacPherson 

Prod. . . 102 

Eight Girls in a Boat — Paramount. . . . 102 

Fashions of 1934 — First National 56 

Flying Down to Rio— RKO-Radio .... 58 

Fog — Columbia 102 

Four Frightened People — Paramount. . 59 

Fugitive Lovers — M-G-M 59 

Going Hollywood — M-G-M 57 

Hips, Hips, Hooray— RKO-Radio 58 



Page 

His Double Life — Paramount 59 

I Am Suzanne! — Fox 57 

I Like It That Way— Universal 102 

Kadetten (Cadets) — Reichsligafilm Pro- 
duction 104 

Last Round-Up, The — Paramount. . . .103 

Let's Fall in Love — Columbia 102 

Madame Spy — Universal 102 

Man of Two Worlds— RKO-Radio .... 103 
Marriage on Approval — Freuler Film. . 104 

Massacre — First National 102 

Meanest Gal in Town, The — RKO- 
Radio 102 

Miss Fane's Baby Is Stolen — Paramount 57 
Moulin Rouge — 20th Century-United 
Artists 56 



Page 

Nana — Samuel Goldwyn-United Artists 58 

Orient Express — Fox 102 

Palooka — Reliance-United Artists 59 

Poor Rich, The — Universal 59 

Poppin' the Cork — Fox-Educational. . . 104 

Queen Christina — M-G-M 56 

Sagebrush Trail — Monogram 103 

Search for Beauty, The — Paramount . 102 
Sin of Nora Moran, The — Majestic Pic- 
tures 103 

Son of Kong, The— RKO-Radio 59 

Sons of the Desert— Hal Roach-M-G-M . 102 

Two Alone— RKO-Radio 102 

Wheels of Destiny — Universal 102 

Woman's Man, A — Monogram 103 



16 



Photoplay Magazine for March, 1934 



l 7 



• I'M NO ANGEL.— Paramount.— It's Mae 
West, and howl Sizzling, wise-cracking. This 
one simply wows audiences. There's Cary Grant, but 
Mae's all you'll see. {.Dec.) 

INVISIBLE MAN, THE— Universal.— Shivery, 
this H. G. Wells tale, in which newcomer Claude 
Rains makes himself invisible — and then loses his 
reason. A creepy, but compelling picture. (Jan.) 

IT'S GREAT TO BE ALIVE— Fox.— Perhaps 
squirrels who see this will think so; most audiences 
won't. Herbert Mundin, Edna May Oliver help 
some. (Sept.) 

JIMMY AND SALLY— Fox.— With the aid of 
secretary Claire Trevor, publicity director Jimmy 
Dunn manages to find his way out of all sorts of 
scrapes that result from his fantastic schemes. Lya 
Lys, Harvey Stephens. (Ffb.) 

KENNEL MURDER CASE, THE— Warners.— 
William Powell in another Philo Vance murder mys- 
tery; smoothly done and entertaining. (Dec.) 

KING FOR A NIGHT— Universal.— Chester 
Morris, a swell-headed, though likable prize-fighter, 
stands the consequences for something sister Helen 
Twelvetrees has done. Exciting. (Jan.) 

LADIES MUST LOVE— Universal.— A "gold-dig- 
ger" partnership breaks up when June Knight really 
falls for Neil Hamilton. Thin, but it has good spots. 
( Wot.) 



• LADY FOR A DAY— Columbia.— Apple- 
woman May Robson thought a society dame 
by her daughter; a stage crowd throws a party to 
save the day. Fine fun. (Sept.) 



LADY' KILLER— Warners.— When ex-girl friend 
Mae Clarke becomes a nuisance, Jimmy Cagney 
tries the new stunt of dragging her about by the hair. 
Margaret Lindsay, Leslie Fenton. Fast comedy, 
but unconvincing story. (Feb.) 



LAST TRAIL, THE — Fox. — A Zane Grey 
Western with racketeers instead of rustlers, and speed 
cops in place of cowbovs. The changes don't help it. 
(Oct.) 



LIFE IN THE RAW— Fox.— George O'Brien and 
Claire Trevor in a Western enriched with new ideas. 
(Oct.) 



• LITTLE WOMEN— RKO- Radio.— This clas- 
sic is exquisitely transferred to the screen. 
Katharine Hepburn, as Jo is sky-rocketed to greater 
film heights. Joan Bennett, Frances Dee and Jean 
Parker, as Jo's sisters, give spendid performances. 
(Jan.) 

LONE AVENGER, THE— World Wide.— The big 
bank robbery is the burden of this Ken Maynard 
Western. Youngsters won't be disappointed. (Sept.) 

LONE COWBOY— Paramount.— Without Jackie 
Cooper there wouldn't be much of a picture. Jackie's 
sent West to comfort his dead father's pal embittered 
by his wife's (Lila Lee) faithlessness. (Jan.) 

LOVE, HONOR AND OH, BABY!— Universal. 
— (Reviewed under the title "Sue Me.") Shyster 
lawyer Slim Summerville tries to frame ZaSu Pitts' 
sugar-daddy. Riotously funny, after a slow start. 
(Nov.) 

• MAD GAME, THE— Fox.— Spencer Tracy, 
imprisoned beer baron, is released to catch a 
kidnaper. He loves the assignment — after what the 
kidnaper did to him. Love interest, Claire Trevor. 
Well acted. Not for children. (Jan.) 

• MAMA LOVES PAPA— Paramount— Lowly 
Charlie Ruggles is made park commissioner; 
involved with tipsy society dame Lilyan Tashman. 
Great clowning. (Sept.) 

MAN OF THE FOREST— Paramount.— Far from 
being a topnotch Western. Randolph Scott, Verna 
Hillie, Noah Beery. Good work done by a mountain 
lion. (Sept.) 

MAN'S CASTLE— Columbia.— A deeply moving 
tale of vagabond Spencer Tracy and his redemption 
by Loretta Young's love. (Dec.) 

• MAN WHO DARED, THE— Fox— Life story 
of the late Mayor Cermak of Chicago, from an 
immigrant boy in a coal mine to his assassination at 
the side of President Roosevelt. Fine cast, Preston 
Foster in the lead. (Oct.) 

MARY STEVENS, M.D.— Warners.— Slow tale 
of two doctors (Kay Francis, Lyle Talbot) who love, 
have a baby, but won't marry. (Sept.) 

[ PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 123 ] 



MUMMY, JOEY AND 
JENNY NEXT DOOR 
ARE GIVING A PARTY 
AND I'M INVITED 



THATS FINE, 
JACKY 




EVERYBODYS SO 

NICE TO JACKY. 

BUT WHY AREN'T 

THEY MORE 

FRIENDLY TO ME? 

WHAT MAKES THEM 

SO DISTANT? 




THATS A NICE STORY 
MUMMY.BUT WHAT 
MAKES YOU LOOK SO 
FUNNY? 



NOTHING, JACKY, 
I'M JUST.... 
THINKING... 




B.O.GONE- 

lots of Jrieuds ttmtf/ 

SHUT YOUR EYES AND GO 

TO SLEEP LIKE A GOOD BOY, 

JACKY. THE FOLKS NEXT DOOR 

ARE COMING OVER TO 

PLAY BRIDGE 

OH, MUMMY, YOU 
HAVE SO MANY 
PARTIES NOWl 




MUMMY, HERES A 
STORY WITH LOTS 
OF PICTURES. READ 
IT TO ME 



ALLRIGHT.JACKY. 

ITS A LIFEBUOY AD. 

ABOUTA LITTLE BOY 

NAMEDTEDDYAND 

HIS MOTHER 




...UNPOPULAR 
BECAUSE OF"B.O'.' 

...CAN THAT BE 

MY TROUBLE? 

I'LL GET LIFEBUOY 

AND PLAY SAFE 




SUCH GLORIOUS 

LATHER AND SUCH 

A REFRESHED 

FEELING! I'LL 

ALWAYS USE 

LIFEBUOY NOW 





LIFEBUOY IS 
KEEPING MY 
COMPLEXION 
AS NICE AS 
YOURS, JACKY 



# 

II FE BUOY'S creamy, searching lather 
J coaxes out pore-deep dirt — freshens 
dull skins to glowing health. Its pleasant 
extra-clean, quickly-vanishing scent tells 
you that this rich, penetrating, hygienic 
lather purines both face and body pores. 

An ever-present danger 

"B.O." {body odor) in cool 
weather? Yes, indeed! Sum- 
mer and winter alike our pores 
giveoffa^wrfrtofodor-causing 
waste daily. Take no chances 
with this unfor- 
givable fault any 
time of year. Play 
safe always — 
bathe regularly 
with Lifebuoy. 





i8 



Photoplay Magazine for March, 1934 



I 

Take a headache for example 




IVIaybe you over indulged the 
night before — possibly it was some- 
thing you ate. You wake up with a 
throbbing head. Your alkaline re- 
serve is lowered. You feel depressed 
and loggy. 

Then you take Bromo-Seltzer — 
drink it as it fizzes in the glass. See 
what happens ! As Bromo-Seltzer dis- 
solves, it effervesces. This is one of 
the reasons why Bromo-Seltzer so 
promptly gives relief from gas on 
the stomach. 

Then Bromo-Seltzer attacks the 
throbbing pain. Your headache stops. 
Your nerves are calmed and soothed. 
At the same time you are gently 
steadied, cheered up. And all the 
while, the needed alkali is being 
supplied to your blood. 

Before you know it, your head 



clears . . . the pain is gone . . . you 
feel refreshed — like a new person! 

Combines 5 medicinal ingredients 

Bromo-Seltzer is a balanced compound 
of five ingredients, each with a 
special purpose. No mere pain-killer 
can equal its results. 

Remember, too, you take Bromo- 
Seltzer as a liquid — therefore it works 
much faster. 

Best of all, Bromo-Seltzer is pleas- 
ant and reliable. It contains no nar- 
cotics, never upsets the stomach. 

You can get Bromo-Seltzer 
by the dose at any soda foun- 
tain. Keep the economical family 
size bottle at home. Ready at 
a moment's notice to relieve 
headache, neuralgia or other 
pains of nerve origin. 



It pays to make sure of the one 
and only Bromo-Seltzer. Look for 
the full name "Emerson's Bromo- 
Seltzer" on the label and blown into 
the famous blue bottle. Imitations 
are not the same balanced prepara- 
tion . . . are not made under the same 
careful system of laboratory control 
which safeguards Bromo-Seltzer. 
Sold by druggists everywhere for 
more than forty years. Emerson Drug 
Company, Baltimore. 

NOTE : In cases of persistent headaches, where the 
cause might be some organic trouble, you should of 
course consult your physician. 



EMERSON'S 



BROMO-SELTZER 




Quick 



Pleasant 



Reliable 




Ernest A. Bachrach 



THE exciting life is Douglas Fairbanks, Jr.'s heritage, and the Fair- 
banks grit and vigor is evidenced in every line of his sharply chiseled 
profile. Young Doug has become a restless ocean hopper. He made 
"Catherine the Great" in London, returned to Hollywood for "Success 
Story," and soon may be back in London to do a picture with Fairbanks,Sr. 




Russell Ball 



FLORINE McKINNEY'S gorgeous blue eyes reveal a dream and the 
determination to make it come true. They've been trained on the 
high goal of stardom ever since she set out from Fort Worth, Texas, for 
Hollywood in a spluttering flivver two years ago. Recently seen in 
"Beauty for Sale" — she has it to spare — her next is "Hollywood Party" 







Clarence Sinclair Bull 



DIANA WYNYARD, post-graduate of the English charm school, 
has been missed by American screen audiences since her appearance 
with John Barrymore in "Reunion in Vienna" some months ago. M-G-M 
has been shifting plans for her next vehicle, but it should not be long 
before this fine actress of "Cavalcade" fame is before her public again 




Otto Dyar 



DO you think Rosemary Ames looks like Marlene Dietrich? Many 
people do. Others see a resemblance to Tallulah Bankhead. Fox, 
however, insists she will be quite a personality in her own right, follow' 
ing release of her first picture, "Disillusion." Miss Ames, an Evanston, 
111., girl, made good on the London stage before Hollywood recognised her 












soft 



*" H,l. S ° r * Or '° W "°^e 



9 'oth 









"e^. ~~* 4n<y 




Encnanted moments . . . with JEAN PARKER'S lovely, expressive hands 
enfolded in Tom Brown's. Scene taken from RKO's new film, "Wild Birds.'' 



TRY Hinds Cleansing Cream, too, by the same makers. D< 
cafe, light. ..liquefies instantly, floats out dirt! 10c, 40c, 6 




Hurre 



JEAN HARLOW'S beauty lends itself superbly to studies in contrast 
and dramatic portraiture. All a good photographer needs is a black 
background, one bright light, the lovely platinum blonde for a subject — 
and the result is as striking a picture as ever came out of Hollywood 



Close-Ups and Long-Shots 



A VITAL movement is the cleaning-up of film 
advertising. The Associated Motion Picture 
Advertisers — which represent the advertising- 
fraternity of the several major companies — have set 
themselves the task of barring offensive publicity. 

There has been a tendency — a perfectly human one, 
by the way — to overstep conventional bounds in the 
ballyhooing of certain films. And films themselves 
have not been entirely above fault. 

The following excerpts from a statement, prepared 
by the board of advertising censorship, in the Hays 
organization, are significant. 



THE motion picture industry has resolved to 
clean itself up. It has resolved at the same time 
to modify its salesmanship and its objectionable ad- 
vertising. This is because now that the industry is 
operating under the NRA code, being forced to recog- 
nize its tremendous responsibility to the public, it has 
come to realize that if the government is all powerful 
in its determination to modify or even to close up 
certain motion pictures, then the duty lies heavy on 
this industry so to modify its output that the criticism 
that is so often leveled against it may be killed at the 
outset — not by the powers of the government, but by 
the motion picture producers themselves. 



pictures and, indeed, one or more magazines have 
made a specialty of publishing them. 

With the recent crop of musicals, filled with 
imitative Sally Rands and other dancers, the number 
of dubious publicity photos has been on the increase. 



HOWEVER the great majority of the "still" 
photos that creep into print are not even of 
actual scenes from pictures. They are specially posed. 
But, naturally, the public does not know this. 

Moreover, scores of unknown extras and bit players 
are induced to have their scantily clad figures repro- 
duced in the less discriminating publications. 

Hence, the Hays office ban is wholly logical and 
sensible. 



GRETA MEYER, German actress, appearing in 
the film, "Let's Fall in Love," adds her bit to 
"what's wrong with Hollywood." She says that 
European actors are given a complete theatrical 
education, which includes everything from dancing, 
diction and make-up to the history of the theater. 

Well, our stars may be badly trained, but what 
puzzles us is, why are they so much more popular on 
the other side of the water than the home talent there? 



T"T is absurd to think that any government would 
JLallow the continuance of any industry which daily 
and hourly was holding up to a vast majority of our 
citizens ideals of conduct, ideals of moral behavior, 
customs of undress or habits of common morality 
which, if adopted by a majority of our people, would 
change this country of ours from a country of homes 
and home-loving people into a country of libidinous 
immoralists." 

Vigorous language, perhaps, hut it is a criticism of 
the motion picture industry from within the industry 
itself. And, yet, I cannot feel that the situation is 
quite as bad as represented. Perhaps the crusading 
spirit is riding just a bit too hard. 



THE Will Hays organization — Motion Picture 
Producers and Distributors of America — has 
ordered a stop to the releasing of publicity photos that 
are not in good taste. There has been a flood of such 



AND John Barrymore believes that the old school 
of melodrama makes actors. That sort of train- 
ing nourished versatility, says John. He points to 
brother Lionel and Paul Muni as shining examples. 
He might have added that he once joined with Ethel 
and Lionel on a barnstorming tour. And Lewis Stone 
came to pictures via the hard and rocky route of a 
San Francisco stock company. 



KATHARINE HEPBURN, in an interview, re- 
marks that the stage "improves one's acting im- 
measurably." Well, probably few will qua r rel with 
that statement. Hollywood's raids on Broadway 
theaters would indicate screen producers share thai 
opinion. 

Going back to Greta Meyer's comment, it would 
appear that Europeans lay emphasis on preliminary 
training, Americans on actual experience. I incline 
toward the American method. 

25 



WHAT does an American movie star do when she 
is presented to the Prince of Wales? 
What would you do? 

If you didn't do just the approved thing, very prob- 
ably you would stir up no end of commotion and 
comment, just as Greta Nissen did recently. 

We're going to let you in on an interesting letter 
written by Greta to a friend in Hollywood. 



I 



T was all a very stiff and formal affair," says 
Greta, "and the English ladies curtsied deeply upon 
the arrival of the prince. I, for one, did not curtsey; 
being a foreigner, I did not feel I had to — but as I was 
the only one in the whole room who did not, it stirred 
up quite a commotion." 

So we gather from Greta's letter that the best thing 
to do when you meet a prince is to say, "How do you 
do?" Leaving the nip-ups to the home talent. 



IF your boy or girl gets into the movies, that proves 
it is brighter than the average child. Miss Lois 
Home, school-teacher on the Warner Brothers lot, has 
made that discovery. The quotient 100 is used as the 
basis of the average child's intelligence. Miss Home 
finds that studio children rate a quotient of 109. She 
bases her report on her work with .">617 youngsters she 
has taught on picture lots. 



his particular offering, "The Spice of the Program." 
The books of one major studio are said to show that 
these little films constitute twenty-five per cent of the 
profits of the corporation. Yet aside from those in 
which such famous personalities as Laurel and Hardy, 
and Mickey Mouse, appear, the studios seldom pub- 
licize these tidbits. 

Surely, what is good enough for the public to accept 
is good enough to advertise. 



THE critics mostly say that they were disappointed 
in Hepburn's acting in the stage play, "The 
Lake." But if Sarah Bernhardt or Eleanor Duse had 
won her reputation first in pictures and then had come 
to Broadway, the critics would have been disappointed 
in them, too. 

The screen is the land of true fantasy. Those who 
continue to call stage dramatics an art and motion 
pictures an industry may choke on that statement. 
Yet every person that is flashed on the screen — even 
though he be but a bit player — takes on an importance 
and an interest out of all proportion to reality. And 
when Katharine Hepburn returns to Broadway, fresh 
from such astounding triumphs as "Morning Glory" 
and "Little Women," critics are likely to note the 
absence of the screen halo 

A goddess in the flesh, looking very human in make- 
up behind the footlights, can never radiate quite such 
glamour as when sitting, aloof, on Mount Olympus. 



GEORGE RAFT was resting on the set of 
"Bolero," between shots of his famous tango 
with Carole Lombard. 

"All right, George," the assistant director called, 
"get ready for rehearsal." 

"Why rehearse again?" asked George. "Let's do 
it." 

"Yes," snapped up Mack Gray, the Raft shadow, 
who hasn't one thing to do with the dance or the 
picture, "we want to do it while we feel in the mood. 
We don't want to rehearse around all day. We're in 
the mood to shoot it." 



SHORT subjects are popular. In fact, the motion 
picture industry grew up on that fare. In 1910, for 
example, recklessly extravagant purveyors of screen 
entertainment were giving as many as six films (each 
a separate subject) for a nickel. 

Some patrons didn't like the two-reelers when they 
first appeared. And managers of the local houses 
heard about that. 

Today, New York City has theaters which show 
only newsreels and other short subjects. Of course, 
Walt Disney's Silly Symphonies, or other cartoons, 
are part of the program. 



IN practically every picture theater in the land, 
"shorts" fill out the bill. They are, as one producer 
has long announced on the screen in connection with 



COLUMBIA is now, most definitely, in the major 
league. There's a score of familiar names — in- 
cluding some famous ones — on their roster. 

Some, as John Barrymore, are signed for one 
picture; others for several. Claudette Colbert will do 
three a year. Gene Raymond has a three-picture 
arrangement. As has also Elissa Landi. 



AND read this list of names: Marian Nixon, 
William Gargan, Edmund Lowe, Ann Sothern, 
Mary Brian, Fay Wray, Jack Holt, Grace Moore and 
Joseph Schildkraut, Richard Cromwell, Walter Con- 
nolly, Tim McCoy. 

President Harry Colin of Columbia has, in a re- 
markably brief time, brought his company right up to 
the front. 



OXCE upon a time there was a little boy from the 
slums of New York, who went away, one sum- 
mer, to a Fresh Air Camp. And it was cool one night, 
so the little boy crept out and stole the two blankets 
off the little boy in the next tent. And the Camp 
Master talked so kindly and reasonably to the little 
blanket -pilferer, that the next night he stole only one 
blanket! 

The little boy was Eddie Cantor, and his companion 
was Walter Winchell. 

Kathryn Dougherty 



2i 



1'iiotoplay Magazine fok March, 1934 



27 



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ALL LIFE IS A BEAUTY CONTEST 

For — like Joan, the girl above — 
you, too, are in a daily Beauty 
Contest. At a party, a dance, as 
you walk down the street — wher- 
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charm, your skin are judged by the 



searching eyes of men and women. Pure, creamy-white and delicately fragrant, Camay 
So get yourself a Camay Com- comes in a green and yellow wrapper, in Cellophane. 
plexion — a skin soft as petals and 
down. Then gallant remarks and 
sincere compliments will be a 
daily occurrence. 

Camay, the Soap of Beautiful 
Women, is your ally. Use it faith- 
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soon you'll detect a new perfec- 
tion in your skin. 

Get a supply of Camay today. 
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Copr. 193? Procter & Gamble Co. 



A M AY The Soap of Beautiful Women 




Garbo's amazing personality has 
kept her high upon the throne, 
worshipped by millions, for over 
a period of seven years. Will 
her reign continue? 



Is It Garbo 



FOR over seven years Garbo has sat on her throne, aloof, 
inaccessible, and mysterious as the dwelling place of 
deity itself. 

For over seven years her keen rapier of a hypnotizing 
screen personality has been sufficient to ward off any ambitious 
usurper. 

But today Katharine Hepburn, wielding a smashing, 
shattering mace of sheer dramatic genius, through a short 
campaign of little more than a year's great acting, stands 
challenging at the very portals of that heretofore secure 
citadel. 

Will she eventually overcome Garbo and wrest from her the 
coveted perch by virtue of her genius, or will Garbo remain 
invulnerable through her inexplicable, universally appealing 
"something," her fascination which has conquered everyone 
from the country plowboy to the cosmopolite — from the 
miner's wife to the millionairess? 

Which one is destined eventually to triumph — and rule? 

Katharine Hepburn is probably the greatest actress ever to 
come to Hollywood. She has proved beyond doubt (and there 
were plenty of early doubts, including her own) that she can 
throw herself completely into a characterization until she is 
the person she portrays. There were skeptics after "A Bill cf 

28 



Divorcement," and more after "Christopher Strong," but most 
of them capitulated with "Morning Glory." "Little Women" 
thoroughly clinched the argument. 

And so, although her first sensation was a controversial 
sensation, her latest has amounted to universal capitulation. 
Capitulation to her genius. 

But can acting genius alone secure for her and hold for her 
the supreme place on the screen? Can it overcome the mysteri- 
ous but recognized force that is Garbo's? 

Hollywood history says no. 

BUT then, to repeat, Hollywood has never seen anything like 
Katharine Hepburn. 

It had never seen anything like Garbo. It has never seen 
anything like Garbo since. Never seen such a matchless 
personality. 

And, heretofore, personality has been the precious metal 
from which movie idols have been molded. The greatest, the 
most enduring screen personalities have never completely 
lost themselves in their roles. They have not been able to, 
and still remain screen idols. Even such a finished dramatist 
as George Arliss remains George Arliss, whether in the screen 
guise of Disraeli, Voltaire or The Rajah in "The Green 




Hepburn's acting ability marks 
her as one of the finest artists 
that ever came to Hollywood. Is 
genius alone sufficient to make 
her a monarch? 



One rules with personality, 
the other with artistry — 
but only one can he queen 

By Kirtley Baskette 



Goddess." The incomparable Barrvmores remain Barry- 
mores, with distinct Barrvmore gestures, inflections and 
mannerisms, although able to create the feeling somehow that 
no one but a Barrymore could have possibly played that 
particular role. And so it is with every great screen idol — 
Marie Dressier, Joan Crawford, Ann Harding, Chevalier, 
Dietrich, Harlow — on down the list. 

There are even great actors who consistently out-act the 
stars in so-called "character roles," big and little roles. Walter 
Huston, Jean Hersholt, Lewis Stone, Otto Kruger, May 
Robson. But they don't become screen idols. 

Personalitv — Garbo has it, if vou can limit her esoteric 



charm to such a commonplace word. Personality on the 
screen and off. Enough to create and maintain a legend. 
Enough to weave about her a magic spell of mystery, which 
continues to intrigue everyone because it is genuine, though 
impossible to identify or touch. 

Off the screen, Katharine Hepburn has apparently attempted 
to construct such a legend of mystery, but that "something" 
is absent, and instead of effectiveness, it has resulted in down- 
right craziness. Her off-stage mysteriousness (and this is not 
debunking, because it's common knowledge to Hollywood) 
evaporated quickly, exposing pranks resembling those of 
a schoolgirl putting on an act. 

THE exotic lady from Sweden could do it, but not the madcap 
from Brvn Mawr. 

Hepburn simply can't be consistent in her oddities. 

On her arrival in Hollywood she begged for seclusion and 
privacy, but her outfits were enough to stop the proverbial 
clock. She wanted to slip creepie-mousie around Hollywood 
but she rented a spectacular foreign-made car to do it in, and 
rode with her feet cocked up on the back of the front seat! 
She wanted to be left alone — so alone — but she insisted on 
standing in the middle of RKO-Radio's streets, or sitting in a 




busy studio doorway, to read her 
mail. 

She went around the lot carrying 
a white monkey, which she tied to 
the desks of people she wanted to 
plague. She gambled with the 
publicity department whether she 
would grant an interview or not. 
She shooed photographers away 
one minute and then took it "big" 
with a wide grin for them the next. 

She took an almost pathological 
delight in allowing the wildest 
tales to be broadcast about her, 
without denial. She was supposed 
to have several million dollars as a 
rich New York heiress; she was 
also terribly poor. She was the 
mother of several children from her 
different marriages; she had never 
even been in love. She was this 
and she was that. 

The thing wasn't a mystery. Tl 
was a gag. And gags are old stuff 
to Hollywood. 

CONTRAST this (and you can't 
compare Hepburn and Garbo on 
one single point — you have to con- 
trast them) with the actual mystery 
which surrounds Garbo even today, 
after her long years under Holly- 
wood's searching microscope. 

At her own studio no one knows 
anything about her. Outside of 
one or two very close friends, no one 
in the whole town has any faint 
inkling of what she does, or why, 
after her old-fashioned limousine 
rolls out of the gates. Most of the 
M-G-M employees have never even 
glimpsed her. Other top notch 
M-G-M stars are barred from her 
set. She is the lady no one knows, 
and she is the real McCoy. 

She is not just odd, she is 



Hepburn's artistry makes her roles great. In the 
above scene from " Trigger," the movement of 
her hands, the attitude of her body, her facial 
expression, give the scene reality. She is an 
actress, expertly playing her part. With Garbo, 
it is the force of her own powerful personality that 
makes her pictures great. Below, the moment in 
"Queen Christina" is made dramatic because 
of Garbo's hypnotic presence, rather than because 
of acting technique 



individual, to the nth degree. 
Strikingly individual. Her coat, 
turned up at the collar, her long 
''Garbo bob," her mannish skirts 
and rough clothes when they were 
first aired were undeniably hers. 
They suited her. They were odd, 
but they fitted. She offered no 
apologies for her eccentricities. 
Her sphinx-like silence might have 
been calculated, but it was effec- 
tive. If her personal myth was a 
myth, and an act, which is very 
questionable, it has grown into a 
reality — at least an accepted myth, 
which is the next thing. 

THE point is that off the screen 
Garbo makes them like it and 
Hepburn makes them laugh. 
There's a lot of difference. 

But on the screen — the difference 
has narrowed down to a very thin 
margin indeed. 

Each captivates, devastates in an 
entirely different manner, but each 
does captivate, and each does com- 
pletely devastate. 

Garbo does so because she is 
Garbo, and Hepburn does so in 
spile of Hepburn. 

There is no argument about the 
fact that Hepburn was an unknown 
quantity, even after "A Bill of 
Divorcement." To some audiences 
she was actually antipathetic. 
They didn't like her. Her voice 
grated, her manners were too posi- 
tive, too masculine, too rough. 
Her personality, mainly, was what 
they were criticizing. 

Xow we have the astounding 
situation (very possibly the first 
time in the history of the screen) 
where an actress has swept every- 
thing [ PLEASE TURN' TO PAGE 99 ] 




so 



Only Al 
Wanted 



to PI 



ay 



?? 



The amazing story 
of the making of 
Wonder Bar" 



By Wi Ilia m 

F. French 



IT'S a gay set— a scene 
that delighted jaded 
Broadway some three 
years ago — now being 
reproduced in thrice its 
original splendor. A great 
room, the center of which is 
a glass-like dance floor, 
circled by a hundred 
brightly lighted tables, 
sporting a brilliant floor 
show, a teasing, tempting 
orchestra — with Al Jolson 
strutting his stuff before the 
gorgeously gowned Dolores 
Del Rio. 

All about us are beautiful 
women. We hear the rustle 
of silk, the clink of glasses 
and the restless rhythm of 
youth and pleasure. 

Close to the camera Di- 
rector Lloyd Bacon is 
stretched out in his canvas 
chair, hat jammed down 
over his eyes. 

Facing him, their backs 
to the famous "Wonder 
Bar," which extends along 
the far wall, sit Kay Francis, 
Ricardo Cortez and Dick 
Powell. They are joined by 
the grinning Al and the smil- 
ing Dolores. All five raise 
their glasses to a toast. 

Happy, happy set! 

"Click," goes the still 
camera. The players at the 
bar change their pose — and 
that is not all. Kay shrugs, 





Dick Powell tried every way to get out of the picture, 

and couldn't. So Dick sings the part assigned him and 

good-naturedly takes the crumbs that fall his way 



Dolores Del Rio and Al 
Jolson are quite dis- 
tressed about Mr. Cor- 
tez! But Ric, and some 
others in the cast, 
would just as soon be 
carried off the set and 
never come back 



glances about her and 
settles back with queenly 
indifference. Ricardo's 
toothful smile straight- 
ens into a thin, hard line 
and friendly Dick Powell 
grins sheepishly at his 
director. 

Meanwhile Al Jolson 
edges a little forward in 
the center of the group 
and Dolores keeps dis- 
creetly silent. The al- 
most inevitable friendly 
repartee that follows a 
shot is strangely missing. 

"Just one big, happy 
family," I suggested to 
Director Bacon. 

"Yeah," he returned. 
drily. 

"But we are going to 
get a good picture out of 
this." 

And there was more 
than just prophecy in his 
words — as the amount of 
ni^ht work the players 
did on the production 
and final results prove. 



31 




In "Wonder Bar" Jolson keeps the spotlight. The lovely lady, of course, is Kay Francis. 



Bacon happens to be the kind of director who backs his bag- 
ful of tricks with a bull-dog grip; which wasn't a bad asset in 
the making of "Wonder Bar," with Jolson intimating a walk- 
out if he didn't get his own way, and Kay Francis expressing a 
queenly hauteur, and Ricardo Cortez' smile assuming knife- 
like sharpness — and with even Dick Powell besieging the office 
with demands for his release from the picture. 

But why? And why did the cheers of Guy Kibbee, Hugh 
Herbert, Louise Fazenda and other members of the cast as- 
sume the resonance of the well-known raspberry? 

For the simple reason that no one on the lot wanted to play 
in the picture and practically everybody in the cast was dragged 
in. In fact, it was the grandest little shanghaing act ever 

32 



staged in Hollywood; which is saying a great deal. With 
the exception of Dolores Del Rio, whom Jolson personally 
picked and who has the juiciest part, outside of Al's own, 
every player in the picture came to work in handcuffs, so 
to speak. 

The general complaint? Bad parts — or bits, as some of the 
players claim. That, and Al's alleged inclination to go into a 
huddle with the camera too frequently. 

Without doubt, it is difficult for a stage star who used to 
carry his own show almost single-handed not to hog scenes — 
but you can't bat all the time in the big league. The other 
players have to be let in on a little teamwork — especially if 
they happen to be featured players and stars. 




Photo by Charles Rhode? 

While atop a camera crane, Busby Berkeley skilfully directs the lavish dance spectacle 



To use Guy Kibbee's words: "It's no fun wearing the uni- 
form if the other fellow's the whole band." 

The grievance, however, is deeper than just that— for none 
of the players selected felt they had parts that did them justice. 
They were not all as nimble in dodging the call as was Warren 
William, who, upon being informed that he was nominated for 
one of the parts, merely raised his eyebrows — and took a little 
trip to New York. There was nothing Warren would rather 
do than play Kay's husband, but— er— not in "Wonder Bar." 

Kay, meanwhile, had been told a little fairy story about the 
really charming part which was being re-written for her, and 
which Mr. Jolson was going to have built up big. Al, you know, 
happened to own the story — the picture being made from his 



New York show of the same name, which had a moderate run. 

"I didn't like the part the first time it was suggested to me," 
explains Kay, "and after I got the script I liked it less. In the 
first place, there was really no part there for me at all. Just a 
bit — nothing more. It was a part any one of twenty girls on 
the set could play just as well as I. 

"Naturally, I told them I didn't want to do it. They in- 
sisted — and I had to play it even though it was not re-written 
into anything. 

"No actress likes to play an insignificant part — especially if 
it has no place in the script and could be cut out entirely with- 
out hurting the story — but it is not the mere playing of a small 
bit that I resent in this instance. [ please turn to page 111 ] 



D 



ID you ever wonder about 
those eye-filling gowns worn 
by the movie queens of Holly- 
wood? Those sleek and shiny 
ones, those ruffled and puffy ones, 
those glamorous and seductive 
ones? Whence they come? And 
how and when and why? 



Secrets of the 



Well, you can bet your bottom 

dollar on one thing. They didn't just happen like 
Topsy. They're the result, those gorgeous clothes of 
the screen stars, of long weary hours of fitting. Of 
standing on one foot. And then the other. And 
possibly the head before it's all over. 
Those fitting room walls! Oh boy, oh boy! What 
they could tell if they could talk! Those studio 
designers! What they could tell a waiting world! 
And won't, drat 'em! Except — 
Well, it seems Carole Lombard was working on 
one lot, and going over to Paramount to have 
her clothes made by her favorite designer, 
Travis Banton. 

And the minute Carole left the front door, all 
the little dressmakers and fitters and cutters 
began flying about like mad, getting out the 
Lombard frocks. They knew she was on 
her way, for that loud, screeching sound 
that any ordinary cit- 
izen calmly dismisses 
as a fire siren in full 
blast, was just Car- 
ole preparing to 
enthuse over 
Banton's new- 
est creation. 
Up the stairs 
to the fitting 
room, she 
*.ty bounded. 



'• (i rffr* nHf« ,| tm || fM» u '" M "" II "'I iiHII 




Travis, get the beaded 
As if evervone within 



the 
I— 



Still screeching and still screaming, 
dinner majigg ready, I'm on my wa\ 
two miles didn't know it already. 

The beaded dinner majigg was brought out. "Travis, 
squeals grew wilder, "it's gorgeous. It's gr-rand — oh 
Travis — " 

The fringed negligee was next. 

The screaming increased. The fitters, practically deafened 
and, by this time, almost as hysterical as Carole, flew madly 
about. Everything from an unusual scarf to a bit of lace, be- 
came another reason for wild bedlam. 

Well, by the time it was over and Carole was blithely on her 
way, the fitters were prostrate, while Banton held his throbbing, 
aching head in the water cooler. 

BUT do they love it? And do they purposely design the 
loveliest of all clothes for the enthusiastic, to say nothing of 
the slightly feverish approval, of Carole? 

Hopkins, little Miriam, of course, sends everyone screaming 
for the nerve tonic by the time she appears. By the time 
Miriam is through, at least four fitters and one tailor are seized 
with the heebie jeebies and can't stop twittering like birdies 
or something. 

It's quite awful. 

There she stands. A tiny little blonde honey. 

"Travis, it's lovely. But here at the hem — " the fitters 
spring to the hem — "the sleeve is too loose" — they spring to 
the sleeve — "the seam — the hem — oh, I love the neckline — 
the back is too low" — they leap to the back — "the jacket is" — 
they leap jacketward — "the belt" — well, when it's over, the 



" Stop! " Norma cried, when the green 
dye bath was finally ready. " Maybe 
white is best after all. Or do you 
think the green, or maybe — " In the 
end, the gown was water-melon pink. 
And Norma, looking very charming in 
the color, wished she had decided on 
blue. Or maybe green 

34 




Fitting Room 




nating nose veil that accom- 
panied it? 

Let me tell you about that. 
Feather by feather, that glam- 
orous headpiece came to life. 
One feather was added near 



Rip, sew and gossip 
— there are screams 
and jitters when the 
stars try on clothes! 

By Sara Hamilton 

I LL I S T R \ I K I) 1! 1 I K A N K D O B I A 5 



leaping fitters go leaping about the studio like kangaroos, 
jabbing pins into people and things. Miriam has the dress on 
upside down, one leg through an armhole, the other through the 
neckline. The jacket is now a train and Banton a bewildered 
maniac. 

And Miriam loves it. Adores it. Upside down or not. Leg 
in armhole or not in armhole. 

She thinks it's too elegant. And that always helps. 

But Dietrich. Now we're going to let you in on something 
very special. That glamour, that allure, that — whatever the 
heck it is — is manufactured right in Travis Banton's fitting- 
room. Made, mind you, like so many washing machines, 
and isn't that "sumpin." 

Remember the knock-'em-dead coque feathered tur- 
ban she wore in "Shanghai Express?" And the fasci- 



the left eyebrow. It was sur- 
veyed by Marlene, by Ban- 
ton, by the fitter, by the 
tailors and, last but not least, by Joey Von Sternberg 
himself. It should be, maybe, just a sixteenth of an 
inch to the right, someone would suggest. So the 
feather was placed one sixteenth of an inch to the 
right and again it was previewed enmasse by the 
anxious audience. 

After something like two and one half days on 
one feather, another would be added with the 
same performance all over again. After four 
weeks, three days, seven hours and three-and- 
one-half minutes, all the feathers were placed 
at their most alluring, provocative angle, and 
everyone was ready for the nose veil. 

[ PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 104 ] 





Clarence Sinclair Bull 



IT took lots of persuasion to get Otto Kruger off 
Broadway into movies. But once there, he made up 
for lost time! Kruger played leading roles in six 
pictures during 1933 — his first year in Hollywood. 
His next is the movie version of "Men in White" 



Little Girl, 
Don't Cry! 



Hollywood deals harshly with 
wild-eyed youngsters who 
want to be slinky heroines 

By Jeanne Hayes 



IF you've ever seen a dream walking, it's little Mary 
Carlisle, as sure as you live. 
Mary with those China blue eyes, round apple dumpling 
cheeks, a little nose that turns slightly up, and hair two 
shades off the gold standard. 

All of which is just too bad for Mary. For looking like a 
doll is about the worst thing that can happen to any little girl 
within whose girlish bosom yearneth the desire to be-eth a 
great, heaving, husky-voiced, slinky-limbed heroine. For 
Mary will dimple in the comicest places and giggle at the 
wrong times. 

"And what chance have I," Mary says, "when people keep 
calling me 'Dollv'? Fll bet no one ever called Garbo, 
'Garby.'" 

Seriously though, and no kidding, it is something to think 
about. 

For here's this swell little kid with a marked degree of talent, 
a tremendous capacity for taking it on the chin, a willingness 
to work, and, to top it all off, a burning, seething, flaming 
ambition. And she has to look like that. Dimples in her knees 
and an ache in her heart. 

RIGHT now, of course, it's cute. That roly-poly business 
and the little girl giggle. But Mary is going to be a big 
girl any day now. Mary is nearly twenty-two. Mary will 
just have to grow up. 

So little girl, what now? 

Yousee.Mary could never be happy off a motion picture lot. 
It's all she's ever really known since she was fifteen. It has 
taken the place of those fudge party, pillow-fighting days of 
boarding school. Where those lasting, undying friendships are 
formed. It's taken the place of the wild excitement of a 
college dance. The whispering and sweet romancing of a girl 
in school. It's the only school so many of these little girls of 
the screen ever know. And it's why they are never happy in a 
world outside motion pictures, once they've had the slightest 
taste of it. I've seen them. Other wide-eyed little blondes of 
the screen who have come and gone. And then stood, pitifully 
unhappy little girls for the rest of their lives, outside looking 
in. You could name a round half dozen of them yourself, off 
hand. 

Striving, weeping, dying within. Youth, happiness, every- 
thing hopelessly lost in the struggle, that grows harder and 
harder with the Hepburns, the Gairbos, the Dietrichs, taking 
their places in the sun. 

Brave, gallant little lost girls of the 
screen. 

Pitiful isn't it ? Dimples in her knees, 

And so we look at Mary, her yellow ^^nL^l 

cur s bobbing, her giggles echoing up forget her am bitions- 

and down the studio lot, meeting all no t even while dancing 

rebuffs and disappointments like the with Bing Crosby in 

[ please turn to page 107 ] " College Humor" 




37 



They, Too, Were 



"f^j *^^" ■ 



a 



'jr* v < 



l/A 




c 



K> 



K 



m 



m 



startled into semi-shame at its own 
forgetfulness, looks around to check 
up on the lost legion of stars that 
were. At such times when a player, 
whose name once was a toast and 
still is a tradition, bobs up shorn of 
the glittering robes of stardom. 

True, some of those who tasted 
glory are doing well enough in 
careers far removed from greasepaint. 
Others are having a hard, heart- 
breaking time of it, trying to stay 
in the profession which remains their 
very life's blood. Some have new 
philosophies — others live in the past. 
But all prove that Fate, where 
careers are concerned, plays few 
favorites in Hollywood. 

Fifteen years or so ago, the big- 
gest star on the Universal lot was 
pretty Ella Hall, still remembered 
for the film, "Jewel." 

Today, Ella Hall is a saleswoman 
at the most exclusive women's dress 
shop on Hollywood Boulevard. And 
she's a very good one, too — so good 
that all the stars' trade contacts are 
in her charge. 

Ella was said to have been in love 
with Director Robert Leonard, but 
vivacious Mae Murray, coming out 
from the "Follies " stole him away. 



Ralph Graves, once a movie hero, is now 
a writer. This picture was taken after 
he married the late Marjorie Seaman, 
left. The other lad}' is Colleen Moore 



WHEX Clara Kimball Young was 
discovered recently living in a 
shabby, four-family fiat in Los 
Angeles, financially pressed for 
the necessities of comfortable existence, 
Hollywood shuddered when it recalled the 
Clara Kimball Young of only yesterday. 

Then she was the magnificent star whose 
city estate was one of the show places of Los 
Angeles. Then she was the best dressed 
actress in Hollywood, whose S50,000 chin- 
chilla coat established a legend of sartorial 
splendor. 

It seemed that Clara had suddenly been 
harshly dealt with by life, by the Fates 
of Hollywood who spin destinies with small 
regard for feelings. But, of course, it wasn't 
sudden at all— just seemingly to Hollywood, 
which is so busy with exciting affairs of the 
moment that it hasn't time to look back very 
often. 

Someone outside of Hollywood had to 
tell Hollywood about Clara Kimball Young. 
From that she got her first screen job in 
many, many months — the part of Jackie 
Coogan's mother in Jackie's film comeback. 
It was a job she needed badly. 

It is at times like this that Hollywood, 

38 





X 



Clara Kimball Young, at one time most glamorous of stars, was re- 
cently discovered in a shabby Los Angeles flat. The old fellow re- 
ceiving the drink is George Fawcett, once famous for his grumpy roles 




Read the roll of 
famous names of 
other days. What 
do we find these 
folk doing now 

By Kirtley 

Baskette 



So Ella married Emory Johnson, an actor- 
director, who failed of complete success. 
When their children needed additional sup- 
port, she took, a job behind the counter and 
made good. 

When Bebe Daniels and Mrs. Skeets 
Gallagher opened their new dress shop in 
Westwood Village, they wanted Ella to take 
charge of it. But her employer wouldn't let 
her go. She was too valuable. She was 
reckoned a star again — but this time a star 
saleswoman. 

Business always has attracted stars to 
whom the screen seemed to offer nothing 



Many will never forget Milton Sills and Katherine MacDonald in 
"The Woman Thou Gavest Me." Her movie days over, Katherine 
went into the cosmetic business. Sills died in 1930, after a heart attack 



Francis X. Bushman was idolized, and 
all women envied Beverly Bayne. But 
whence offered to marry any woman who 
could support him, no one took him up 



further. Some have developed latent trade 
talent and achieved success. To others, the 
venture has meant the loss of what financial 
security they had left. 

Kathleen Clifford, "Pretty Kitty" Clif- 
ford, who at one time was Hollywood's most 
beautiful blonde ingenue and, later, leading 
lady, started and operated a chain of florist 
establishments in Hollywood and Beverly 
Hills until the depression came along and 
forced her to give them up. Now she runs a 
beauty shop, a more modest business, but 
one which she is making yield her a living. 

Katherine MacDonald, the stately "Amer- 
ican Beauty," whom President Woodrow 
Wilson nominated as his favorite of all 
screen stars, launched her own cosmetic shop 
with some success, while Florence Lawrence, 
the famous old "Biograph Girl," who was 
the biggest star of the biggest company of 
its day — even before Mary Pickford had 
ascended to her throne— failed not long ago 
in a beauty salon venture. Now she lives 
in an obscure section of Hollywood, com- 
pletely out of the scintillating world. 

39 




Dorothy Davenport Reid was a big star when her much more 
famous husband, the late Wallace Reid, was doing bit parts. 
As he ascended in the movie firmament, she retired to the real 
life role of wife and mother, but, upon his death, emerged 
again. With the substantial means left by Wally she added to 
her personal fortune, but made the mistake which has spelled 
ruin for more than one star. She turned producer and took 
heavy losses, which ate up her fortune, and forced her to make 
a living managing an apartment house in which she had a half- 
interest. 

Of late, her ambition has been to mold the screen career of 
Wally Reid, Jr. ; and as for herself, she has fought back to a 
place in Hollywood as a scenarist and director, recently 
directing "The Woman Condemned" for Willis Kent, an in- 
dependent producer. 

YOU recall how Charlie Ray lost a large fortune producing 
"The Courtship of Miles Standish." The "Ince wonder boy," 
who had a tremendous following as America's country cousin, 
had suddenly gone sophisticate, donned tails and a top hat 
— and failed. He tried again and again. Several times during 
the past few years he has attempted a feeble comeback, but 
Hollywood has turned a cold shoulder in his direction. Vaude- 
ville engagements keep him alive, although every year a rumor 
trickles through that Charlie is about to stage a comeback. 
Now no one even believes the rumor. 

But even before Charlie had definitely arrived as a star, 
Monroe Salisbury was devastating hearts as the screen's 
perfect lover. Marguerite Clark sought him for her leading 
man in several of her pictures, and Marguerite Clark, you will 
remember, was running right along-side of Mary Pickford. 

Today, Monroe is night clerk at the Warner-Kelton hotel in 
Hollywood (owned bv Pert's folks) and at one time had an 
interest in the place, while Marguerite, retired for many years, 
is the wife of a wealthy New Orleans man, and her Southern 
mansion with its carved glass door on magnolia-scented St. 
Charles Street has few things in it to remind her of her star 
days. 

Marguerite Clark was the sweet, nice girl of those early days, 



Raymond Griffith (center) 
was a favorite in pre-talkie 
days. His inaudible voice 
hurtled him from top-rank. 
Now he is Zanuck's ace 
writer at 20th Century 



but the wicked vampire, the 
sensuous siren, was Louise 
Glaum, another Thomas Ince 
star who scored a sensation in 
a sticky picture called "Sweet- 
heart of the Doomed." 

Luring men to their down- 
fall was her forte for the 
camera then, but today it's lur- 
ing customers to the box- 
office, for Louise with her hus- 
band operates a movie theater 
in National City, California, 
not far removed from the 
honky-tonks of Tia Juana. 

They don't make much mon- 
ey, because there aren't very 
many people in National City, 
but there, where Louise is said 
to be happy and healthy, there 
isn't the tragedy of hanging on 
when the crowd has passed by. 

Perhaps the most pathetic 
side of Hollywood is presented 
by those who stand in the extra 
lines and sit on the set watch- 
ing new stars receive the adula- 
tion — the attention that once 
went to them. Ethel Clayton 
has stayed in Hollywood, turn- 
ing to the studios when bad 
fortune overtook her. Can a 
star of her former importance 
relish the tiny bits she must 
play? 

Recently, on the set of 
"Bolero" at Paramount, Eli- 
nor Fair, the beautiful girl 
who played with Bill Boyd in 
the memorable "Volga Boat- 
man" and then married him, 
and Julanne Johnston, once 
Douglas Fairbanks' leading 
lady, sat practically unnoticed 
in their extra-bit capacities 
while Carole Lombard and 
George Raft held the spotlight 
they used to know. 

Mae Busch, Mary MacLaren, 

[ PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 94 ] 




Today, Francis Ford works as extra, when he gets 
a part, and watches others in leads he used to play 



JjD 



■ *v 



■n 







■ * .. 





V. 






1 







* 



\ 



\ 



\ 

V 



jf 



JANET GAYNOR goes Southern and turns back the years in "Caro- 
lina." The photographer caught her in one of her most demure 
moments, resting on the studio set and looking very charmingly old-fash- 
ioned. Yes, suh, her new role, with its rustle cf silk and romantic appeal, 
should be highly pleasing to Miss Gaynor's enormous personal following 



V. 




> 



Ernest A. Bachrach 

"]\/TY darling, what is 
l^J-the matter?" Rob- 
ert Young seems to be trying 
to administer tender solace 
to Katharine Hepburn in her 
sadness. This scene is from 
Katie's latest photoplay, 
"Trigger," the story of a girl 
of the Kaintuck mountains 



THIS scene from "As 
the Earth Turns" is 
laid in New England's coun- 
tryside, and Donald Woods 
— you've heard of him on 
New York's stage — makes a 
pretty picture of ingenuous 
love with gray-eyed Jean 
Muir, the farmer's daughter 




' 4 




"•V**" 





MY, my, how those Con' 
tinental lads can make 
love to pretty American girls 
and how pretty American 
girls can respond! At any 
rate, Jeanette MacDonald 
and Ramon Novarro are hav' 
ing a very delightful time in 
"The Cat and the Fiddle" 



CAN she believe him? 
Well, Claudette Colbert 
looks as though she does. 
Take that dreamy expression 
in her dark, French eyes! 
And Clark Gable turns to 
see if his wooing is going 
over. You'll find out in 
"It Happened One Night" 




Ernest A. Bachracti 



THIS striking suit of silver lame accentuates the loveliness of Irene 
Dunne, now to be seen in "Transient Love. ,, In private life Irene 
is the star of a "long distance" marriage. Her husband, Dr. Francis Grif' 
fin, is a New York dentist. One or the other is always on the jump be 
tween Hollywood and New York. Absence seems to whet their fondness 




By Ruth 
Ran kin 



He won't act in a 
play that's "written 
for him." Don't try 
to "type" him. It 
can't be done 



What's This Muni Mystery? 



M 



an 



ii 



that 



some 



maintain he is? 



NOW some are calling Paul Muni T c 1-,^ +l-./=k ^TovhA 

the ''Garbo man" of Hollywood. 
A legend has been built around 
him — a legend of temperament 
and aloofness that would establish him as 
the masculine counterpart of the esoteric 
Greta. 

His independence occasions no little 
awe. His refusal to mingle with the crowd, the manner of his 
stealing away from Moviedom whenever the spirit moves him, 
the way he dictates production plans — -these and other high- 
lights of the Muni legend keep Hollywood prattling over its tea. 

"Some one was going to play the masculine Garbo sooner or 
later," say the prattlers. They have figured Muni as more 
nearly filling the role than that other aloof and independent 
gentleman, Ronald Colman. 

As for Muni, " Garbo Man" or no, there is one thing he will 
do: He will talk about himself, will give his explanations for 
being what he is. 

"I am always worrying, always tormented, when I am in the 
midst of a picture— yes, and long before, preparing. I have no 
mental peace. Physically, I am not equipped to mingle. At 
the end of a day, I have not enough strength left to go out. 



"I did not start out in life to be con- 
vivial. To begin now would be an affec- 
tation. I have no small talk. 

"Not that I wish to appear a highly 
mental person. I do not rate any higher 
intellectually than others. 

"My mental calibre is simply different. 
It is not pretentious. I value simple, 
normal things most highly. 

"I know actors less than any one, although my own family 
and my wife are of the theater. I mean, as Hollywood views 
knowing actors. It seems to me they meet, they immediately 
ask what the other fellow is doing, each proceeds to explain at 
some length. But frankly, I cannot think they are truly 
interested. 

"Then, the subject exhausted, they look at each other with 
a great deal of pathos — and long for an escape. 

"I am ungainly in a gathering of graceful, social persons. I 
cannot hop right in with just the right degree of informality 
and ease. I don't know the approach. I don't blend. 

"I cannot exhibit myself, except when outside myself. I 
mean, except when under the refuge, in the complete disguise, 
of a character. [ please turn to page 100 ] 

45 



Yok K A nnouncing 



The Monthly 
Broadcast of 




"Well," laughed Doug easily, "I couldn't 
think of a finer gentleman for Joan. I'm very 
fond of Franchot, myself." And with the 
same easy smile, he walked away. 

A NEIGHBOR'S little girl, drag- 
"^^ ging a battered doll, wandered 
into the Bing Crosby home the other 
morning while the nurse was bathing 
Bing's young hopeful. 

"How long have they had that 
baby?" inquired the visitor. 

"Oh, about seven months," ans- 
wered the nurse. 

"My goodness, but you've kept 
him nice !" admired the young caller. 

TT'S no secret that Al Jolson is doing every- 
thing in his power to get Ruby Keeler to quit 
movies cold. Warner Brothers have already 
felt the pressure of Al's influence on Ruby. 

Al declares he doesn't want Ruby to be tied 
up to a contract. He wants her to be free to 
come and go. But a lot of people feel Ruby's 
rapid rise has been a little too much for Al. 
After all, one star in a family seems to be the 
rule these days. 

A TAYBE Mae West actually did start some- 
thing. At any rate, the millennium has ar- 
rived. Two actresses in Hollywood have been 
ordered to put on pounds. Claudette Colbert, i;i 
training for her role of Cleopatra, has some fifteen 
to assemble to charm the voluptuous Ptolemy. 
It seems that Cleo was a little Westish, and 
Caesar and Antony liked 'em that way. 



It's a long time between lunch and 
dinner. So Clark Gable thinks. Con- 
sequently Mr. Gable was a regular 
customer at the hot-dog wagon that 
stationed itself near the set of "It 
Happened One Night." Clark co- 
stars with Claudette Colbert 



SAY what you will, the Bennett girl is fair. 
Watching her husband's picture, taken in 
far-off Bali, the credits flashed on the 
screen . . . "Produced by the Marquis de la 
Falaise." Then the next, "Directed by the 
Marquis de la Falaise and Gaston Glass." 

Nudging Gaston in the darkened room, 
Connie said, "You know a lot more about 
directing than he does, and you well know you 
did most of it. Put your name first!" 

"LJOLLYWOOD is chatting about the change 
in young Doug Fairbanks since his sojourn 
in England. Instead of a nervously pacing 
rather unsure-of-things young man, Doug has 
gained enough poise and calmness to last him 
the rest of his life. 

"Are you going to let Franchot Tone steal 
Joan away from you?" one reporter asked. 



Ann Harding and her little niece, Dorothy, chose a quiet corner when they 

went to lunch at Sardi's, but they couldn't escape the cameraman. Ann's 

own child, Jane Bannister, is about the same age as Dorothy 



46 



Carole Lombard is drinking cream to round 
out the figure after "Bolero" reduced her to a 
nub. 

"D OSEMARY AMES, one of Fox's 
■*■ new contract players, importation 
from England, is still a little confused 
about Hollywood. 

The publicity department brought 
a magazine interviewer out to see her 
the other day. 

"Have you been interviewed be- 
fore in Hollywood, Miss Ames?" 
queried the scribe. 

"No," replied the actress, and then 
brightly, "but an insurance salesman 
called yesterday !" 

TN "Queen Christina," Greta Garbo and John 
Gilbert have a rendezvous in an inn. To 
Christina, all of the inanimate things in their 
chummy room become very dear, due to their 
association with her romance. 

One sequence consists of Garbo moving 
about the room, caressing various objects, 
while Gilbert watches, silently. She takes her 
time, too. 

To some her every motion seems as graceful 
as a dancer's — a joy to behold. 

Others are impatient, or were when the 
sequence ran so long at the world premiere 
of the film in New York. 

At that showing, irreverent ones in the audi- 
ence snickered when Gilbert's well feigned 
curiosity finally stirred him to ask! "What are 
you doing? " 








The "Queen of Sheba"in her dressing-room — with Herbert Mundin — doing 

her make-up! Betty Blythe is back in pictures after an absence of years. 

She will be featured with Mundin in "Ever Since Eve" 



The camera can make midgets of us 
all — if the angle is right. And this is 
how Leslie Howard photographs when 
the camera looks down on him. The 
picture was taken aboard the Aqui- 
tania, on Howard's recent return from 
his native England 



T\ 7ARNERS suddenly discovered that they 
needed Lyle Talbot for another scene for 
"Mandalay" — and needed him real badly. 
But he couldn't be found. After much probing 
around, it was discovered that he had started, 
with the Countess di Frasso, as guest at a 
ranch. They finally hit on the expedient of 
broadcasting for him — that brought him back 
a-running. 

flUY KJBBEE took his wife and 
^"little girl out to luncheon at the 
studio the other day. As he was 
reading things from the menu, little 
Shirley stopped him with the inquiry, 
"Daddy, what's a croquette?" 

"One man's meat," answered papa 
without even pausing to think, "is 
another man's croquette." 



47 



TT looks as though Henry B. Walthall has the 
all-time screen record of them all. The 
veteran Little Colonel of "The Birth of a 
Nation" revealed recently that he has played 
in no less than six hundred pictures in his 
career, spread over some twenty years. 

OHADES of a bygone glamorous day came to 
^mind the other evening when Mae Murray 
did a solo "Merry Widow" on the floor of a 
smart New York night club. Mae got up to 
dance when the orchestra played that waltz 
and, when she was recognized, the dancers 
backed off, leaving the entire floor to the 
terpsichorean art of the famous dancer. 

"\X7ELL, you can take it or leave it 
— anyway, a certain young lady 
couldn't rehearse her dance in 
Paramount's "Bolero" one day, be- 
cause she had contracted a bad cold 
sitting too near a fan. Her name 
is Sally Rand ! 

TF you've ever seen a small boy suddenly dis- 
covered by his teacher doing something he 
shouldn't, you'd be reminded of that guilty 
expression in getting a load of Max Baer the 
other afternoon holding hands with a blonde 
cutie. Max was in a little hideaway restaurant 
where none of the Broadway crowd ever go 




Two Bennetts were cornered by the 
camera at Colleen Moore's party — 
Barbara and Joan. It's rumored that 
Barbara is going back into movies. If 
so, the two blonde Bennetts may have 
sisterly brunette competition 



T\ 7ELL, maybe Jeanette MacDonald is put- 
ting on a little weight, as one of our lead- 
ing daily columnists recently pointed out 
carefully. But the French like them that way. 
Anyhow, at a very dignified ceremony con- 
ducted by the French consul, Henri Didot, 
Jeanette was presented with a scroll which ap- 
pointed her to a vice-presidency in the Alliance 
Francaise, one of the oldest French Fraternal 
institutions. Because Jeanette is the most 
popular American picture star in France, that's 
why. 

"\ 7ICTOR JORY once drove a taxi in Los 
Angeles. At the end of the first month he 
had taken so many of his friends riding, he 
owed the company $2.60. So he took up 
acting. 



A LTHOUGH they had two marriages within 
a year — enough, you would think, to con- 
vince each other they both meant "sure- 
enough," Sidney Fox and her writer-husband, 
Charles Beahan, have cut the nuptial knot for 
keeps. 

Sidney, who was somewhat of a darling at 
Universal, may return there to resume her 
screen career, abandoned for the domestic role. 



IT AY FRANCIS rushed out to a lonely little 
spot on Long Island and went into hiding 
the moment news of her anticipated divorce 
became public. And is her face red after all 
those things she said not so long ago about 
"how to hold your man." 



Here's one little girl that has plenty of protection! At least, while she's 

playing ice hockey. It's Dorothy Lee, an ardent devotee of the game, all 

dressed up to take on any team at the Ice Palace in Hollywood 



48 



when, zippo, a news hound came up to him and 
said hello. Max blushed — honestly — and 
squirmed about a little, then blustered some- 
thin" incoherent, while the blonde grinned. 



TF Claire Trevor's relatives ever begin moving 
in on her, she will have to take over a hotel. 
Claire has twenty-two first cousins, and that's 
just a starter. 

A XD a very well chaperoned honeymoon 
Gary Cooper had with his bride. Her 
parents and his were with them most of the 
time. 

"\X70ULD you like to hear Groucho 
Marx's conception of "The Last 
Round-up"? 

"Many a night," jitters Prof. Marx, 
"have I bought the last round up in a 
Hollywood penthouse speakeasy." 

"L-TARRY GREEN, inimitable comedian, as 
he came out of the studio gate, ran into a 
group of children assembled there to obtain 
autographs from the outcoming stars. 

His arrival caused some silence, and finally 
one little girl approached him dubiously. 

"You don't look like a movie actor," she 
said, "but I'm not taking any chances. Sign 
here." 




On your mark — get set — ready — go! George Raft loves his work so much, 

he remains ready to jump onto the set at the director's bidding. George 

is ready here, to leap into one of the last scenes in "Bolero" 



A trio of sisters — Sally Blane, Loretta 
Young and Polly Ann Young. Polly 
is the only one who isn't in the movies! 
If people will get in a dither over roles 
and contracts — well, Polly leaves it to 
her sisters 



J( ATHARINE HEPBURN was very snooty 
to the Washington newspaper men, but she 
says now it was all a mistake. She didn't have 
the faintest idea that Jed Harris, New York 
producer of the play she is now doing, had 
specially invited the reporters to call on 
Katharine at the station. Always remember, 
Katie, a reporter is a reporter wherever you 
find him — whether he's had a special invitation 
or not! 

/^HARLIE RUGGLES was sick in bed with 
^^*a cold for a few days. But sister-in-law 
Arline Judge says she knew he was getting 
better when she caught him trying to blow the 
foam off his medicine. 

" A LL things come to her who 
■^^ waits," says little Joby Arlen. 

"It took me seven years to achieve 
a baby — and nine years to get an en- 
gagement ring!" 

Dick Arlen broke down with a 
grand emerald-cut diamond for a 
Christmas present. 

"CAN dancing pays. Of course, a lot depends 
on the lady behind the fan. Anyway, Sally 
Rand has invested the proceeds from her 
Chicago Fair fan-dance episode in a 15-acre 
orange grove at Glendora, California. Her 
mother has been installed as "boss of the 
ranch," and Sally spends her week-ends out 
there. 

[ PLEASE TURN TO PACE 96 ] 



49 



Green-Eyed 
Jealousy 



When stars stoop to trivial 
personal enmities, the whole 
industry gets the jitters 




This team was a hit in "Love 

Me Tonight," but Maurice 

Chevalier has no love for work 

with Jeanette MacDonald 



DID the long arm of 
Hollywood's famous 
jealousies actually reach 
into Mexico to prevent 
the amicable settlement of the 
argument between Lee Tracy 
and the Mexican government 
and to stir up additional trouble, 
in this way becoming instru- 
mental in the cancelling of the 
popular star's contract? 

Newspapers reporting on the 
"late unpleasantness" stated 
that "friends of Tracy said they 
blamed his predicament in part 
on professional jealousy of other 
actors who, they alleged, could 
have avoided much of the trou- 
ble if they had wanted to. They 
also declared other actors caused 
the investigation to be reopened 
after Tracy was released the 
first time." 

If this is true, then is it not 
time jealousies of this type were 
stamped out, or at least muzzled 
so that their rabies cannot infect 
the entire industry? Of course, there are those who claim pro- 
fessional jealousy does more good than harm, as it fosters 
greater individual effort on the part of the stars and inspires 
them to do their best work. 

Others, however, believe that fair spirited competition would 
actually wipe out jealousy, especially jealousy of the type ex- 
pressed at the Mae West opening in Hollywood of "I'm No 
Angel." 

The premiere at Grauman's Chinese Theater was to be a 
great affair, with numerous bright lights, celebrities, masters of 
ceremonies, radio hook-ups and impromptu talks by stars. 

So the radio announcers were all set to do a lot of introducing, 
but as the cars pulled up to the curb, and the great lights made 
night into day, and the crowd was surging restlessly, they 
looked in vain for the stars who were to cluster about the 
microphones. 

Then began the combing of the lobby, the theater and even 
the neighboring drug stores for the missing celebrities. 

50 



Was it nice of Miss Tobin to raise havoc with Joan's picture, "Goodbye Again? " 



And all Hollywood snickered — and giggled — and grinned. 

Then the truth came out. The stars weren't surging with 
the general public to see Mae strut her stuff. Not only were a 
number of stars from other studios "not interested," but it was 
reported that it took heart-to-heart pleading to bring the stars 
out from her own lot. 

Why? 

Jealousy. Good, old-fashioned, dyed-in-the-wool jealousy. 

MAE had too much of everything for them," they tell us, 
"and the other stars couldn't take it. Later on, they 
sneaked in to see the picture, but they were too jealous to 
show Mae the courtesy her ability deserves." 

Whether it was jealousy, or whether they all happened to be 
working cross-word puzzles that night, exceedingly few film 
celebrities accepted Mae's invitation to "Cm up V see me 
som'time." 

Jealousy in film land is often expressed in subtle ways, and 



double-edged retorts. Sweetly, and with a 
smile — but below the belt, just the same. 

1 here was fear of a jealousy between 
Dietrich and West, and dread at the 
thought of another situation like that be- 
tween Gloria Swanson and Pola Negri. 

But Mae, it seems, has a way of shed- 
ding unpleasant subjects with a shrug and 
a wisecrack. 

When the absence of stars at her open- 
ing was brought to her attention, she is 
reported to have shrugged and retorted: 

" Maybe they figure seeing this picture 
would come under the head of home- 
work." 

Not all stars regard expressions of jeal- 
ousy as lightly as Mae appears to, and in 
some cases old feuds have smoldered for 
years, and been carried from studio to 
studio. They extend throughout entire 
careers and into the lay world after their 
participants' picture days are over. 

AND, strange as it may seem, half the 
time the parties to the jealousies do 
not, themselves, know what started them. 
They seem to grow from nothing into 
something small enough to be merely an- 
noying, or big enough to menace a career. 

When asked once of the reputed jeal- 
ousy between herself and Lilyan Tash- 
man, Constance Bennett is reported to 
have replied: "That is beyond me; I don't 
even know the woman." Yet it is gen- 
erally believed that neither will go to a 
party if the other is invited. 

Without doubt, most Hollywood jeal- 
ousies are started through misunderstand- 
ing and gossip. 

It takes little to give birth to jealousy 
in the film colony. Many are holding their 
thumbs, awaiting the outcome of Kay 
Francis' statement that she can think of 




The Jimmy Cagney-Eddie Robinson rivalry is keen 
but friendly. Not so with all men stars, however 



Jealousy kept the stars away from the opening of "I'm No 
Angel." Mae didn't care! She fixed them with wisecracks 



nothing more tremendously unimportant than being the best- 
dressed woman in pictures. It seems hardly reasonable that 
Kay meant that as a "dig" at anyone, but some are wondering 
if the proud Lilyan may not see it as a gauntlet tossed to her. 

Joan Crawford is said to have suggested that a picture of 
Jean Harlow be taken from the set on which she was working. 

" What's the idea of putting other stars' pictures in my set? " 
Joan is said to have demanded. Needless to say, Jean's picture 
came down, pronto. That, however, does not necessarily in- 
dicate an outburst of jealousy. 

What causes these jealousies? A number of things — most 
universal of which is a healthy functioning of the law of self- 
preservation. This law is all powerful in a motion picture 
studio where a star's life is short and uncertain, at best, and 
where extras sky-rocket into favor almost overnight. Where 
every newcomer is a potential threat. Hence professional 
jealousy. 

Nor have the stars a corner on jealousy — as any casting 
director will tell you. Over at Central Casting real diplomacy 
is needed to keep extras from giving battle over the assignment 
of "calls." Bitter jealousy among the extras is a matter of 
amusement in Hollywood, but the "misunderstandings" among 
the stars keep the entire industry in a case of "jitters." 

You may think men don't go [ please turn to page 117 ] 

51 



Sing. Hollywood 






TIDDLE de iddle boom de aye, tra la la la hip hooray! 
It all started with the advent of the musicals. And 
with the musicals came the necessity for songs. And 
songs and songs and more songs. They couldn't import 
song writers fast enough to fill the orders. So what happened? 
Overnight the place was alive with people who didn't know 
one note from another writing boo boo boo boos and do dum 
e day doos. 

Actors sang, lawyers sang, bakers sang, doctors sang. I 
sang, he sang, we, you, and they sang. It was terrible. It 
still is. And growing by the minute. 

Perfect strangers run up hallooing to other strangers: 
"Mister, wait. I've got as far in this song as 'Oh, night in 
June, under the moon,' and now where do I go?" 

"Well, you go three blocks to the left and one to the right. 
In My Old Kentucky Home Kosher Delicatessen, there's a 
wiener stuff er who knows some swell words for 'moon' and 
'June.' New hot stuff like 'baboon' and 'buffoon.'" 

And like the wind the stranger is off for the wiener stuffer. 

Blythe ladies trip aboard the trolley cars and with a gay 
little tune sing: 

"Mister Conductor, here's my nickel. 

"A transfer, please, and don't be fickle. 

"How do I get to Fifth and Main? 

"Let's all join in the sweet refrain." 

Milkmen, at early dawn, rush up to movie star's stucco, 
out-of-lucko, hillside homes with 

"Sleep on, lady, have your dream, 

"While Cupid brings your milk and cream." 



T* **\ 



Which isn't so hot for just then the fair dreamer slithers up 
to the front door and answers: 

" 'Ittle Cupie, hoopy doopy, 

"Mustn't be so gosh darned snoopy." 

And anoints the singing milkman with a little whipping 
cream in a manner in which he has never before been 
anointed. 

Why, once upon a time, tablecloths in Hollywood were used 
to cover luncheon tables and a lot of monkey business, but now, 
alas, they are used mainly and insanely to write songs on. 
More theme songs and current hits are written on Brown 
Derby and Vendome tablecloths than a Bus Berkeley cutie 
could shake a leg at. 

For instance, people are no more seated at a lunch or dinner 
table than out come the pencils, pens, crayons, water colors 
(you find the water color type in every profession, these days) — 



J 






&*" 



/» 





anything that will make a mark, and like fiends, they go 
to work, batting out a song. 

Waiters hover near, giving suggestions. And darn 
good ones, too. In fact, no Hollywood restaurant will 
have a waiter these days who doesn't know what 
rhvmes swell with a lot of words like "June," " Croon," 
"Baby LeRoy," and "Warner Brother-First National." 



52 



Sing! 



By Sara 
Hamilton 

ILLUSTRATED BY 
FRANK DOBIAS 





And can skip with the agility of a mountain goat from three 
fourths time to a teasing rhumba in nothing fiat. They may 
not be so hot on the onion soup pouring, but they're there on 
their pianissimos. 

So many swell little numbers were actually written out on 
Hollywood tablecloths, the, cafes decided to dispense with all 
laundry work and keep the cloths intact, filing them away 
carefully for future use, according to their subject matter. 

For instance, all songs relating to love were filed in one cabi- 
net marked LOVE. The various drawers were marked "sex," 
"passion," "Gary Cooper," etc. 

All songs concerning matters such as "When I'm gonna 
away, you'll be sorry, you two- 
timing papa, you," were simply 
listed as "walk-out knock- 
outs." 

Many a studio in the midst 
of a musical foolsical would 
hurriedly 'phone over to a popu- 
lar cafe and say " Quick, what- 
cha got that will fit in some- 
where between Jimmy Cagney 
smacking the leading lady on 
the kisser and the scene where 



Unless you can hum a perfect 
rumba without ever going flat 
— and know that stupid rhymes 
with cupid — you're a flop in 
this hey-hey day of musicals 



the hero finds he loved the other dame all the time?" 

And like mad, waiters and cashiers rush to the tablecloth 
filing cabinet and drag out a suitable little number that might 
fit in. Something like 

"I may break your heart (head or jaw could be substituted) 

"But you're my real sweetheart." 
If the word "head" is used, it could easily be changed to 

"I may break your head, 

"But you're my real sweetbread." 
If the studio insists on using "jaw," the writers feel that's up 
to them. There's no rule in music or lyric that covers a down- 
right body beating or a first class brawl. That's exactly the 
way they feel about it. So there. 

AND, of course, there's that awful, ghastly thing that hap- 
pened recently when a certain well-known song writer had 
just finished a knockout, a masterpiece, and the waiter dropped 
some Camembert cheese on the place that said 
"Darling, I beg you not to tease 
"I am your own to hold and squeeze." 
But the Camembert dropped right on the last four words of 
the gorgeous last line and the masterpiece was ruined. 

Nothing daunted, however, the cafe sold the number to an 
independent movie company that had only $3.50 to spend 
for musical selections and feeling they had a bargain, because 
the writer was a famous one, they merely wrote in, 
" Darling, I beg you not to tease. 

"I am your own little piece 
of cheese." 

Well, sir, believe it or not, it 
was the hit of the picture. 
People went about for days 
humming and singing the little 
cheese number. The chorus 
girls were all dressed as slices 
of rye bread and the whole 
thing was as fetching a little 
routine as ever you saw. 
[please turn to page 105] 

53 



Happy Landing! 






' 



" 









days come for others in the 
tinsel town. 

The top of the mountain 
had to be cut flat and a road 
had to be built. This took 
several months. The house 
is some miles from the 
ocean and all material had 
to be taken up the moun- 
tain on a narrow earth road. 
They dug nearly five hun- 
dred feet before they found 
water. 

From a window ten feet 
wide in the living-room, 
the blue ocean can be seen 
through a deep canyon. 
From the opposite side of 
the house can be seen in a 
valley, more beautiful than 
any Washington Irving ever 
imagined, an orchard, farm 
house and stables, neat and 
white, in which dwell the 
farmer and his wife who 
take care of Bill's place. 

In back of the farmer's 
house, is a magnificent 
mountain of rock, in star- 
tling contrast to the rolling 



Tttf-iirffuflr . i 



Here they met — for a love scene in " His First Command." 
If romance then was pretense, it came true later on 



HE came from far down in the valley of men to occupy 
the finest home on a mountain in California. 
Though it cost far more than one hundred thousand 
dollars, it is as simple and beautiful as a lily. In 
traveling over many nations, I can still pronounce it the finest 
site for a home I have ever seen; and this does not except the 
most magnificent show estates on any coast of this continent. 

The superintendent in the building and furnishing of this 
home was none other than the beautiful Dorothy Sebastian, 
Bill Boyd's wife — the Alabama girl who went into George 
White's "Scandals," and later made good in pictures. 

It is hard to say which one loves the home more — Bill or 
Dorothy. 

On arriving at the house, which is about fifty miles from 
Hollywood, beyond Malibu, in the Ventura Mountains, 
Dorothy first waves at the cow, and then at the horses. 
Dorothy claims that the horses will follow her into the living- 
room for a lump of sugar. 

They found the site for the home while horseback riding with 
the friends who owned the place. Before night Bill bought the 
forty acres. From then on they planned the house of their 
dreams. 

It is more than a place of dreams. The wise couple have so 
planned things that the forty acres support all who live upon 
them. Butter, milk, fruit and eggs are in abundance. A 
eucalyptus grove supplies wood for the immense fireplace. 
Turkeys wander over the ranch. Deer come at night to gaze 
at the lights from the strange intrusion upon their ancient 
peace. Eagles circle above the high mountains, and gulls fly 
in from the sea. The stars hang, blazing in an inverted sea of 
azure. Indeed, it is a setting for kings, acquired by the two 
prudent children of Hollywood, who watched so many rainy 

54 







-J libit 



rFW, 



i -* *■ 



r 



*A } *** >-*■ X - £*i '£ * • 

Iff rrir'r 



~&4&. 



Away from tinsel Hollywood, high on their mountain- 
top ranch, Dorothy and Bill gather their harvests 



Bill and Dorothy 
are safe on a moun- 
tain top — and the 
world is forgotten 

By Jim Tully 



and lovely valley beneath. Dorothy 
has named all the mountains about 
her place. It would not do for map- 
makers to follow Dorothy; she 
calls the highest and rockiest 
mountain Bill Boyd. 

In one end of the huge living- 
room is a picture of Bill portraying 
what I believe to be the finest role 
of his career — Fcodor, in "The 
Volga Boatman." Who the painter 
was I do not know. He put forever 
on canvas the best role played by 
Bill Boyd, and the finest creation 
yet to come from Cecil B. DeMille. 

IT was my honor to see this film 
in New York with the great Cecil 
himself. The opening scene, in 
which Bill Boyd and the gang of 
roustabouts walked along the river 
singing the "Volga Boatman," was 
something to linger long in the 
memory. Now and then through 
the picture was a real touch. In it, 
DeMille forgot his gilded bathrooms, his 
over-shaped and half-clad ladies, his houses, 
the interiors of which had been furnished by 
bric-a-brac dealers. 

In furnishing her home, Dorothy Sebastian 
took no lesson from Cecil B. DeMille. It is 
warm and harmonious. 

The view from all of her windows is a 
Corot landscape many times magnified. 

Bill and Dorothy have a Negro man of all 
work who deserves a paragraph in the history 






~ 







r 






v 



Boyd's work in "The 
Volga Boatman,'' 
several years ago, 
brought Bill to the front. 
He still thanks Cecil De 
Mille for that chance 




-. 



I*. 






**n» 



Dorothy says the horses would follow her into the 
house for a lump of sugar. Bill says, "Let them!" 



of films. He has been with 
Bill for seven years, and 
operates this magnificent 
home with more precision 
than a teacher of domestic 
science. His name is Mose, 
and he was once an erring 
man. 

After drinking oceans of 
Bill's liquor and staying in- 
ebriated for weeks, Bill was 
forced to bid him a sad 
farewell. Then a great light 
came to Mose. Blinded like 
another Saul of Tarsus, he 
returned to Bill four years 
ago, and said, " It just ain't 
right, Mr. Boyd, me drink- 
in' that way — 'specially 
your liquor." Mose hasn't 
had a drink since. 

Bill's father was a labor- 
er. He was killed when Bill was thirteen years old. The lad 
was born in Cambridge, Ohio, and when he was ten years old 
the family moved to Oklahoma. When Bill was fourteen he 
decided to go to San Diego, California. His money gave out 
in a small town a hundred miles from his destination. He got 
a job picking oranges, and made a living at odd jobs until 1918. 
The spirit of adventure moving him again, he came to Holly- 
wood, and joined the hundreds of men and women seeking 
extra work about the studios. 

He obtained three days work in as many months. 
He had a room for which he paid fifteen dollars a month. 
For a long time thereafter Bill walked the streets of Holly- 
wood arm in arm with hunger. 

By this time, the owner of a [ please turn to page 1 10 ] 



Consoling each other over the 

poor success of their last movie 

together, "Officer O'Brien," 

they fell in love 



55 



Select Your Pictures and You Won't 




lY 



MOULIN ROUGE— 20th Century-United Artists 



J A BENNETT steps out in a knockout role, in stunning 
■'-'clothes, and in some very hot-cha dance numbers. 

Her work in a dual role — a pseudo-French actress, 
Raquel, and an American girl impersonating her — takes 
Constance up, up, up the Hollywood ladder. 

As the husband, fooled to the point of infatuation by 
Connie, Franchot Tone turns in a performance that will 
really put him on the map. To Tone's other accomplish- 
ments may be added his capability as a comedian. 

In two grand song numbers, Miss Bennett is assisted by 
Russ Columbo and the three Boswell Sisters of radio. And 
then there's Tullio Carminati, perfectly cast. 

You'll fall for Connie, with her delightful accent, all 
over again. Dialogue is right there. Direction fine. 




it 



FASHIONS OF 1934— First National 



EXACTLY what you mean when you say "an eyeful." 
Only there are several eyefuls in this fashion extrava- 
ganza, dance classic and delightful, fast-moving film. It's 
something brand-new. And you'll love it! 

All about a suave "fashion crook," William Powell, who 
schemes Paris right out of its swank style creations, in the 
grand manner, and makes everyone concerned, you in- 
cluded, like it. 

Packed with cleverness, spectacle, beauty, sophistication 
and tickling humor, not to mention excitement, this picture 
offers a bargain in entertainment. 

Busby Berkeley's dance creations are breath-taking. But 
Powell, Bette Davis, Frank McHugh, Reginald Owen are 
letter perfect. Hugh Herbert is too funny for words. 

56 



The 



Shadow 




A Revieiv of the New Pictures 




* 



QUEEN CHRISTINA— M-G-M 



GARBO, as Sweden's stately sovereign of the Seven- 
teenth Century! 

The magnificent Greta, after an absence of over a year, 
makes a glorious reappearance on the screen. Besides being 
grateful for that, movie devotees will welcome the return 
of Jack Gilbert to his high estate as an actor. Gilbert por- 
trays the role of Don Antonio, an emissary from the King 
of Spain. 

The scenes at the inn where Christina, incognito, and 
Antonio spend three snowbound, romantic days are moving 
and exquisite. 

Her Majesty's abdication from the throne, over the tear- 
ful protest of her people, is impressive — compelling. 

Sometimes the story flows with a grand flourish; some- 
times it staggers a bit under its own weight. But, on the 
whole, Rouben Mamoulian's direction is admirable; S. N. 
Behrman's dialogue is scintillating; settings and costumes 
are rich. 

Garbo, enchanting as ever, is still enveloped by her 
unfathomable mystery. 

In the opening scenes, little Cora Sue Collins effectively 
impersonates Queen Christina as a child. 

The supporting cast is equal to every situation — and 
that's saying a lot when Garbo is creating the situations. 
Lewis Stone, Ian Keith, Reginald Owen splendid. 



Have to Complain About the Bad Ones 



The Best Pictures of the Month 



QUEEN CHRISTINA 
MOULIN ROUGE 
GOING HOLLYWOOD 
FLYING DOWN TO RIO 



I AM SUZANNE ! 

FASHIONS OF 1934 

MISS FANES BABY IS STOLEN 

NANA 



The Best Performances of the Month 

Greta Garbo in "Queen Christina" 
Constance Bennett in "Moulin Rouge" 

Franchot Tone in "Moulin Rouge" 

William Powell in "Fashions of 1934" 

Marion Davies in "Going Hollywood" 

Bing Crosby in "Going Hollywood" 

Dorothea Wieck in "Miss Fane's Baby Is Stolen" 

Alice Brady in "Miss Fane's Baby Is Stolen" 

Anna Sten in "Nana" 

Casts of all photoplays reviewed will be found on page 120 




* 



/ AM SUZANNE!— Fox 



HERE is something entirely different at last. Jesse 
Lasky's newest production more than lives up to its 
predecessors. The famous Piccoli Marionettes and the 
Yale Puppets play some of the principal roles and almost 
steal the show, especially the Lucia Sextette number. 

Lilian Harvey gives a better account of herself as Suzanne 
than in any of her previous American films. She does some 
astonishing acrobatic dancing as the revue entertainer, who 
falls so disastrously and breaks her leg. Gene Raymond, 
sixth generation puppeteer, who runs the marionette show, 
has worshipped her from afar. When deserted in her illness 
by her mercenary manager (Leslie Banks), Lilian is nursed 
back to health by Gene. 

The romance has a charming "7th Heaven" gentleness. 
Gene addresses his attentions to the marionettes he has 
made in Suzanne's exact likeness, until she is consumed 
with jealousy. She recovers from her illness, and can dance 
again, so she returns to the revue, where the marionette act 
is also signed, to show Gene that she can dance better than 
any mere marionette. 

The story is the pet brain-child of the director, Rowland 
V. Lee, who rates plenty of credit for this original produc- 
tion. 

Excellent entertainment for grown-ups and children 
alike. 




* 



GOING HOLLYWOOD— M-G-M 



NEVER has Marion Davies looked more beautiful than 
she does as the little French teacher who, having fallen 
in love with Bing Crosby's voice over the radio, follows the 
crooner to Hollywood. 

Bing has some simply grand songs, and it is now quite 
evident that the lad is also an actor. 

The production is done on the most lavish scale of any 
seen to date, offering much in the way of novelty. 

There are oodles of gorgeous girls, many colorful ensem- 
bles, tuneful music, and Marion displays some heavenly 
costumes. 

Fifi Dorsay is well cast as the temperamental film siren. 
And the inimitable Stuart Erwin, as an amateur producer, 
lends a neat comedy touch. 




* 



MISS FANE'S BABY IS STOLEN— Paramount 



THIS picture, reminiscent of the Lindbergh kidnaping 
case, is a powerful presentation of what actually happens 
when a child is seized for ransom. It offers thrills, terrific 
suspense and will bring a sob to your throat. Dorothea 
Wieck, as Madeline Fane, famous star, is madly devoted to 
Michael (Baby LeRoy). In the night the baby is kidnaped 
and then a struggle arises as to whether the mother shall in- 
form the police or make contacts herself with the kidnapers. 
She keeps a rendezvous with the "snatchers" — Alan 
Hale, Jack LaRue, Dorothy Burgess. But this plan goes 
astray. Alice Brady, as a farmer's wife, intervenes at the 
critical moment. Dorothea Wieck, Alice Brady and Baby 
LeRoy are superb. 

A film you will long remember. 

57 



The National Guide to Motion Pictures 



(RE ;. U S. PAT. OFF.) 



ti 



FLYING 
DOWN TO 
RIO— 
RKO-Radio 




* 



NANA— 
Samuel 
Goldwyn- 
United Artists 



GIRLS performing on wings of planes and the South Ameri- 
can dance numbers, especially the "Carioca," make this a 
decided change from the run of recent musicals. Gene Ray- 
mond falls for Senorita Dolores Del Rio, only to find, upon his 
arrival in Rio de Janeiro, that she is the fiancee of his chum, 
Raul Roulien. Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers contribute 
some good comedy and better dancing. 



ANNA STEN'S magnetic allure and dramatic art will make 
this Russian lady an American favorite. Zola's classic 
takes Anna from the streets of Paris, through many loves and 
tragedies, till impresario Richard Bennett makes her a star. 
Although Bennett, Lionel Atwill, Phillips Holmes and Mae 
Clarke do fine work, the show is all Anna Sten, perfect in her 
role and in her speech. 



CROSS 
COUNTRY 
CRUISE— 
Universal 




ABOVE THE 

CLOUDS— 

Columbia 



c 



OOD comedy which turns to melodrama as the film pro- 
gresses. Playboy Lew Ayres sees June Knight taking a bus 
to San Francisco and buys tickets for himself and Arthur 
Vinton. Alan Dinehart, who planned to travel with June, 
cannot shake suspicious wife (Minna Gombell), and compli- 
cations set in over the scenic route. Alice White plays deluxe 
hitch-hiker. Fine supporting cast. 



ATHR'LLING picture with plenty of air action and a 
climax in which a dirigible cracks in mid-air and Richard 
Cromwell, as the discredited hero newsreel cameraman, is 
vindicated and gets the girl, Dorothy Wilson. Robert Arm- 
strong is Dick's superior who takes credit for all good work 
until the day of reckoning. Many fine shots of actual news 
topics enliven the film. 



ALL OF ME 
— Paramount 




HIPS, HIPS, 

HOORAY— 

RKO-Radio 



THE eternal conflict between a man and a woman presented 
forcefully. Fredric March and Miriam Hopkins sidestep 
marriage when she fears the bonds might throttle love. But 
ex-convict George Raft and his sweetheart, Helen Mack, facing 
motherhood, show such simple faith in life and death that 
superficialities vanish. You'll like Nella Walker and William 
Collier, Sr., in bits. 



WHEELER and Woolsey, a pair of medicine show fakers 
selling cosmetics and specializing in gin flavored lip- 
sticks, muscle into partnership in the beauty concern owned by 
Thelma Todd and Dorothy Lee. Money disappears and Bert 
and Bob, suspected, muscle into a cross country automobile 
race to make their get-away — and what a finish they turn in! 
Plenty of hilarity, dancing, girls and music. 



58 



a v e s 



Yo 



u r 



1 c t u r e 



T 



1 m e an 



d M 



one 



y 



THE POOR 

RICH— 

Universal 




THE SON OF 

KONG— 

RKO-Radio 



SUDDENLY poor and hilariously helpless, Edward Everett 
Horton and Edna Way Oliver entertain Lord and Lady 
Feather stone and their daughter, Thelma Todd, who assume 
their hosts are wealthy. Andy Devine, village character, be- 
comes chef. Leila Hyams, aluminum-ware peddler, is pressed 
into service, also sheriff Grant Mitchell, as butler. Plenty 
of laughs. 



A MERE splinter off the old block is the twelve-foot 
youngster of fifty foot King Kong. The film has a few 
mechanical thrills, and is spiced with hokum. Robert Arm- 
strong, beset by an indictment for damage done by Kong, 
gees back to the ape's island home and discovers the offspring. 
Kid Kong plays cupid for Bob and Helen Mack, and saves the 
hero when an earthquake sinks the island. 



HIS DOUBLE 

LIFE— 

Paramount 




FUGITIVE 
LOVERS— 
M-G-M 



ADAPTED from Arnold Bennett's novel, "Buried Alive," 
it is an amusing story of an artist (Roland Young) who, 
through a mistake in identity, is believed dead. He marries 
his deceased valet's mail-order fiancee, Lillian Gish, and is 
finally discovered through a legal fight over his unsigned 
paintings. For those who appreciate subtle comedy and gentle 
satire. 



THE continual chase of an escaped convict (Robert Mont- 
gomery) by the authorities, and his love for a girl (Madge 
Evans) whom he meets when he boards the transcontinental 
bus as it passes the penitentiary. Nat Pendleton, as Madge's 
unwanted companion on the trip, does well, as do C. Henry 
Gordon and Ted Healv. The moments of high suspense almost 
make up for occasional dull lapses. 



PALOOKA— 
Reliance- 
United Artists 




FOUR 

FRIGHTENED 
PEOPLE— 
Paramount 



CHUCKLES galore in this story of a confused country bump- 
kin prize-fighter. Garnished with Jimmy Durante, Lupe 
Yelez, Marjorie Rambeau and Robert Armstrong, all in top 
form, it offers Stuart Erwin as the laugh-stuffed main entree. 
Between dangers of a ring crown won on a fluke and designs of 
Lupe, Stu is in a stew, until Mama Rambeau saves him. 
Durante pulls a Bing Crosby. 



A GRIPPING tale of four people lost in the Malay jungle, 
and the metamorphosis that happens to each. Claudette 
Colbert, a homely teacher, becomes a lovely woman. William 
Gargan, ego-minded radio star, shrinks into insignificance. 
Herbert Marshall, a self-effacing chemist, grows assured, as he 
grows to love Claudette. Mary Boland, Leo Carrillo fine. 
[adi itional reviews on page 102 ] 

59 




Sweet 
Ali 



ice 



Brady 



Here's what the 

little serio-comic 

of the screen is 

really like 

By Jane 
Hampton 



exquisite taste. The drapes are 
lovely. Except the dogs have 
them chewed into befuddled 
looking masses of something and 
Alice thinks it is just too cute 
for words. On the wall hangs a 
beautiful Matisse. An original. 
While directly under it, piled 
high on a beautifully carved 
chair is a pile of paper-backed 
detective magazines. Quaintly 
called "Dead-Eye Dick," or 
"Ten Murders in One Bar 
Room." Piles and piles of them. 
As fast as Alice reads them, 
which is one a night, they are 
tossed on the beautifully carved 
chair under the original Matisse, 
and the green grass grows all 
around. 



n: 



While visitors turn giddy in her extraordinary home, Alice Brady only laughs 



ALICE 
does, 
right. 
Alice. 
For instance, 
in Hollvwood— 



BRADY thinks she behaves as everybody else 
She thinks those things she does are quite all 
And as far as that goes, they are all right— for 

her house. Why, nobody has houses like that 
or what would people think, for heaven's sake? 
There's her beautiful snow-white living room furnished in 

60 



OW for the dining room, if 
you can tear yourself out of 
Alice's living room. And let me 
warn you if you're not strong 
you had better stay right there, 
for that dining room is some- 
thing. It's all in bright, daz- 
zling bright, crimson plush. The 
wall paper is a crazy-quilt pat- 
tern of splashed crimson. But 
wait! On that wall hangs some- 
thing so lovely, so exquisite, that 
it fairly catches the breath. It's 
an original Bellows. In black 
and white. 

In fact the Bellows was the 
only thing that kept Adrian, the famous M-G-M designer, from 
passing out completely when he beheld yon Brady dining room. 
All of which (the passing out and the moaning and the groaning 
at the horror of it) amuses Alice no end. 

As for Alice herself, she's exactly like her house. Consistent 

in her inconsistencies. An absolutely astounding person. 

Over a little S14.95 frock she [ please turn to page 1 13 ] 
























o4U&4xLo cued Soefao- a. 




Suit Is 
Favorite 
of Chic 
Stars 



HOLLYWOOD 
FASHIONS 

here sponsored by PHOTOPLAY 
Magazine and worn by famous 
stars in latest motion pictures, 
now may be secured for your 
own wardrobe from leading de- 
partment and ready-to-wear 
stores in many localities. . . . 
Faithful copies of these smartly 
styled and moderately-priced gar- 
ments, of which those shown in 
this issue of PHOTOPLAY are 
typical, dre on display this month 
in the stores of representative 
merchants. 



■■■ 



IIOLLYWOOD'S favorite 
'daytime uniform is a suit. 
Wherever you lunch or shop, 
you see the smartest stars wear- 
ing either the strictly man-tail- 
ored suit or the softer, dress- 
maker type like this one of Suz- 
anne Kaaren's. You will see 
Suzanne wearing this costume in 
"Coming Out Party." It is a soft 
blue woolen with high front 
buttoning, wide lapels and trim 
pleated skirt. The blouse is a 
gaily hued plaid cotton fabric 




DILLIE SEWARD wears the classic man- 
L-'tailored suit in black and white pin 
checks. All the stars, including Joan 
Crawford, have these made by a Holly- 
wood tailor — we have had this one cop- 
ied exactly for you. It has a cutaway line 
to the jacket in front and a Norfolk type 
back. Three patch pockets and a plain 
skirt with a single front pleat. You can 
alternate with a plain skirt or jacket 



CHIRLEY GREY, you will see her next 
^in the picture, "One Is Guilty," 
wears one of the pet costumes from her 
own wardrobe. It is a simple black 
crepe dress with a deep V-shaped bib of 
the white crepe. This bib is detachable, 
thus making possible a number of changes 
for the dress. Shirley's jewelry ensemble 
is interesting; it is made entirely of satin, 
with earrings, bracelets and necklaces 



Hollywood Wears Daytime Prints 




IDA LUPINO wears this charming floral print which 
is a copy of the dress Travis Banton designed for her 
to wear in "Search for Beauty.'' Bright flowers on a 
dark ground are offset by a wide collar of starched 
linen, a linen belt and cuffs held with buttons 



SHIRLEY GREY advocates simple styles in dresses 
when the fabric is a gay floral print like this one 
above. Shirley's dress has loops of the fabric making 
an unusual neckline trimming. A scarf is worn across 
the shoulders to give a flare to the short sleeves 



And Crepe For Afternoon 







"THIS stylish crepe frock, worn by 
' Marian Nixon in Columbia's "The 
Line-Up", has wide ties that form a 
belt in the back. The trimming of 
embroidered net forms bows caught 
n the center by jeweled clips. Simi- 
ar bows are caught with clips on 
the sleeves at the wrist. This frock 
has the dolman type sleeve. Stunning! 





Details Give 
Two Costumes 
Smart Accent 




MARIAN NIXON wears this good looking daytime 
dress in "The Line-Up. " It's a bright navy crepe with 
gauntlet cuffs and wide collar of fine handkerchief linen 
and lace. The linen is tucked and stitched, with the lace 
to give it a delicate charm. Notice that the collar widens 
as it reaches the shoulders — the dress is simple, otherwise 



SHARON LYNNE, who is soon to return to the screen 
in the film, "Bolero," considers this ensemble one 
of the smartest in her personal wardrobe. It is a three- 
piece affair with skirt and three-quarter coat in a soft 
myrtle green woolen. The plaid blouse has a high scarf 
neckline and the matching plaid gloves are a gay touch 



J 













J 





P\OROTHEA WIECK'S second American picture is "Miss Fane's 
L^Baby Is Stolen." The many who admired her work in the German 
production, "Maedchen in Uniform," hope for a duplication of that 
success over here. Dorothea has the ambition to play Madame Bovary 
on the screen. Irrelevantly we add, she adores Bach's compositions 







T 



IS "Bolero," the dance made famous after adapters had jazzed the 
music of Maurice Ravel's famous composition. And how Carole 
Lombard and George Raft can turn their toes to its exciting, sensuous 
rhythm, in the picture of the same name! George plays the role of 
Raoul, the gay night club dancer who makes love to his floor partners 







Tenement days are over for the Howards! This is the charming home, outside of London, they occupied when in England 

Leslie Howard's Lucky Coin 



INTO a shabby, walk-up tene- 
ment up on Claremont Avenue 
in New York, a gaunt young 
man trudged his way. Each 
day his shoulders would become a 
little more hunched; each day a 
haunted look in his eyes spelled 
disappointment and discourage- 
ment. For the young man could 
find no work and money was ter- 
ribly scarce. 

That man was Leslie Howard. 
The time was about 1923. 

Neighbors up on Claremont 
Avenue remember him as a tran- 
sient tenant, carrying delicatessen 
food in small paper bags now and 
then, his clothes not at all the 
Bond Street perfection of the 
world-famous actor today. 

It sounded a little incredible — 
this vastly different person com- 
pared with the charming, soft- 
spoken Leslie Howard of romantic 
movie glamour. The Leslie How- 
ard of "Smilin' Through*' and 
"Secrets" and "Berkeley 
Square." 

"How about that?'' I asked 
him. 

"It's true," he said frankly. 
"I lived up there for quite a while 
when I was broke, going the 
Broadway rounds looking for a 
job. I lived in furnished rooms in 
the Fifties, too, eating marmalade 
and crackers for days when money 
was so scarce I'd almost forgotten 
what a dollar bill looked like. 

"That was when my wife, 
who'd stayed in England because 
we couldn't afford two boat fares, 
sent me the lucky guinea." 

He fingered a gold coin sus- 
pended from a chain which he 
always wears around his neck. 

"Ruth sent me this because she 
knew I needed money badly. And 



Some believe Howard might 
still be adding figures if it 
weren't for the golden charm 

By Virginia Maxwell 




Leslie thinks he may die by drowning. 
Because the only time he ever goes with- 
out the lucky coin is when he is swimming 



the day it arrived, my luck 
changed. Turned about so com- 
pletely, that I didn't need the 
money. So I had it made into this 
keepsake which I wouldn't part 
with for the world. I wear it 
always — just for luck— and the 
only time I ever take it off is 
when I go swimming. Some- 
times," he laughed, "I wonder 
if I shouldn't die by drowning, 
because my lucky token wouldn't 
be with me." 

He scrutinized the token care- 
fully. 

"I'd no business wanting to be 
an actor. I had had no experience 
when I first went on the stage in 
England after the war— just a 
tremendous desire to act, to ex- 
press something I had always 
wanted to do with writing but 
never hoped to attain in that 
field. 

"I had worked in a bank in 
London before the war. I've often 
since accused myself of wanting to 
join the cavalry just for the thrill 
of getting away from the montony 
of adding up figures. 

DURING the war I met Ruth. 
We were married in a little 
town where our troops were quar- 
tered for a while. Ruth didn't know 
anything about the stage, either. 
But she had a great sympathy 
for my ambition. We would 
talk for long hours about the 
things I wanted to do. And it 
was she who fired me with courage 
to try the stage, believing I should 
always feel cheated if I hadn't at 
least one fling at it. 

"Just as soon as I was mus- 
tered out of the army, I went to a 
booking-agent in London. Ruth 
and I were very poor, living in a 

69 




away expression as if he were living over again those 
days. 

''It was summer time and England was lovely. We 
toured through Devonshire and Wales, playing at stable 
theaters, gas-lighted back rooms, always amazed that 
people liked our show and forever wondering just how 
long this blessed luck would hold out. 

"We never hoped to play London. That is the last 
word in England, the London stage, just as Broadway 
is the goal of every American actor. 

"But I found this tour an amazing training school. 
I was learning to be a good trouper, to take disappoint- 
ment with a grain of philosophy, to look up and out 
and never back — the creed that keeps people of the 
theater going along so hopefully." 

THERE came then an opportunity for Leslie to do a 
play in London. It was called " The Freaks," and it 
was the vehicle which gave him a chance to show 
whether he had something real to offer in stage talent 
or whether he might have to go back to counting figures 
over a bank ledger. 

Little money, scarcely enough to live on, but oppor- 
tunity. 

The critics' statement that he was splendid, although 
the play was not very successful, gave him the chance 
to come to New York, because Gilbert Miller believed 
what the London critics had said about Leslie Howard. 

"Ruth had to remain in England," he commented, 
with a naive, boyish sadness in his blue eyes. "We 
couldn't scrape together enough money for two boat 
tickets. So T came alone, with high hopes." 

He did "The Green Hat" and made some money. 
He sent for Ruth and she came over, happy to be with 
him again. But luck turned for them a little while 
after she arrived with their son. And it was then they 
moved to the Claremont Avenue flat where neighbors 
remember him as the actor out of work. 

They got back to England somehow, glad to be on 
home ground again. 

Then Fate threw another quirk and Leslie Howard 
was offered a part in the American production of "Her 
Cardboard Lover." He [ please turn to page 108 ] 



Mr. and Mrs. Howard and daugh- 
ter, Leslie, arrive in New York. 
Son, Ronald, wouldn't get in the 
picture 

cheap little flat. We had no telephone. 
So I had to call on the agent every day 
to learn if he could find me a place 
anywhere. 

"Eventually — and it may have been 
because he grew tired of seeing me come 
around so often — he offered me a very 
small role in a tour company. I grabbed 
at the opportunity. Ruth and I packed 
our one bag, got aboard the theatrical 
company train and started out on our 
adventure, deeply thrilled 
that I had at last gotten a 
start." 

Leslie Howard stopped 
talking for a moment; his 
face softened and his keen 
blue eves took on that far- 



Two Leslies, father 
and daughter, smile 
down from the attic 
window of the Eng- 
lish country house 




70 




JUanatt 



V\/ r ITH this man as executioner, there's little hope 

* ' for the condemned! It's Leo Carrillo as General 

Sierra in " Viva Villa." Sierra was executioner for Villa, 

Mexican war lord, whose life story is told in the movie 



71 




Look Out. 



DEAR PATRICIA: What's happened to you? Several 
months ago I saw you in ''The Narrow Corner" and 
thought you were one of the loveliest newcomers I had 
seen on the screen in a long time. Then the other day 
I saw you in "Convention City," and again I cry, "What's 
happened to you? " 

Let me answer my own question and tell you what has 
happened. You've put on weight— several pounds of un- 
necessary fat. And, darling, we're going to have a little heart 
to heart talk right now, only I'm going to do the talking. I'm 
going to tell you how to get rid of the excess weight and get 
back that lovely figure you had a few months ago. And this 
time you're going to keep it! 

Patricia, listen to me! It's no easy job to be a movie star. 
I know because I've been over the ropes with the greatest of 
them. Your devotees demand that you be everything that 
they themselves want to be as far as beauty of figure and face 
is concerned. And you've got to satisfy them always. 

This is straight-from-the-shoulder talk, and it's common 
sense. It is the truth and I want you to take these tips and 
get busy! 

I am a fanatic — perhaps you never knew that. I simply 
can't stand to see a youngster like yourself risk handicapping 
her career by neglecting her figure. 

Patricia, you have everything before you. You can be a 
great star — but that extra weight must come off. It adds 
five or six years to your looks and that is a shame when you're 
only eighteen! 

Now, in the first place, don't slump! Remember that scene 
in "Convention City" in the hallway with Mary Astor? You 
slumped terribly and it accentuated your stomach (and in a 
minute I'm going to tell you what to do about that stomach, 
too). You're intelligent enough to correct that faulty posture. 
Walk in front of the mirror. Study your posture, practice 
improving it. Remember every minute that you're before the 
camera to carry yourself correctly. I'm going to leave that up 
to you. 

NOW to take your hips down. I'm going to give you my very 
best exercise. The extra pounds on your hips are a little 
toward the back. Or do I need to tell you? Every day— and 
I mean every single day — stand stocking-footed with your feet 
six to eight inches apart and just a little pigeon-toed. Now 
raise your hands above your head. Don't stiffen. Relax and 
stretch. Now slowly bnng your torso sideways — with the 
arms still above your head — and as you do that twist so that 
you can feel movement in the muscle that you want to take 
off. I know how you feel. It's tough but you've got to do it. 
Now, still with your body twisted, slowly lower your torso 
until the right hand is on the left heel and the left hand is back 
of the right hand about five inches. Then come up slowly and 
repeat on the other side. Don't forget the little twist and be 
sure that you're relaxed even when you stretch. 

There is a trick to all exercises. The twisting and relaxing 
are the tricks in this one. Do this ten or fifteen minutes every 
single morning. When you feel the muscles over your hips 
pulling, there at the back, you'll know you're doing it right. 
I want that extra flesh to come off fast, because I know how 
much you picture girls hate to exercise. 

Now for your tummy. I want you to get the abdomen nice 
and flat and strengthen the muscles so that it will be held in. 
I hear that you have a grand mother, and I know she'll help 
you with this exercise. I'll bet she has told you about that 
tummy anyhow, but lots and lots of times girls won't mind 

their mothers. That's why I have 
to tell you the things you ought to 
hear. You take them from me be- 
cause you know I'm not prejudiced. 
And I don't care if I make you 
good and mad by bawling you out. 
Then maybe you'll pitch in and 
work like the good little trouper 



Miss Ellis is a promis- 
ing young actress, but 
Sylvia says she must 
reduce. Exercises and 
a diet, which gives Pat 
plenty to eat without 
adding weight, are 
prescribed 



you are 



Patricia! 

says 

Sylvia 



Take off those excess 
pounds, correct that 
figure! And here's how! 





G. Maillard Kesslere 

She has a critical eye! But 

Sylvia's frank analyses and 

good advice have preserved 

many a famous figure 



ankles. Now remember, Pa- 
tricia, relax so that you're a 
dead weight from your waist 
to your knees. Bend your 
knees and let your mother slow- 
ly pull up your legs away from 
the floor and in the direction of 
your head as far as you can 
stand it. This raises your 
thighs from the floor and lifts 
the abdominal muscles. The 
abdomen sort of rolls on the 
floor. Do it back and forth as 
much as you can take. 



I, 






In "Convention City," Sylvia thought Pat had too much weight through hips and stomach 

Put a sheet on the floor. Wear some loose-fitting pajamas. 
Lie on the floor on your stomach with your arms straight out 
above your head and your legs straight. Don't stiffen. Relax. 
Have your mother stand at the side and take hold of your 

And don't miss Sylvia's personal ansivers to girls, on page 88! 



'LL admit it isn't a sweet 
feeling and you'll be sort of 
sore for about three days. But 
if you'll relax the whole time 
it won't be hard, and does it 
do the work ! 

I want you to dance as much 
as you can — but maybe I don't 
need to tell you that for I hear 
that you're one of the most 
popular girls in Hollywood. 
And the next time you go to a 
party I want everybody to rave 
about how wonderful you look. 
Because you're a rising star, 
people are watching you, and 
you've got a big responsibility. 
Speaking of your being a 
rising star reminds me that I 
must give you a word of warn- 
ing about your health. You 
need energy to do the work you've got to do! So I'm going 
to give you my energy diet. It will give you so much pep, 
you'll be rolling great big rocks up those hills by the First National 
Studios. The diet will also make [ please turn to page 88 ] 




Rumor has it that Mr. 
and Mrs. Cy Bartlett 
spent New Year's Eve 
in a telephone booth 
at the Cocoanut Grove. 
The couple has an alibi. 
They were calling their 
friends, wishing them 
happy New Year. It 
took a long time be- 
cause Alice would tell 
Cy what to say, then 
Cy would yell, "Wait a 
minute — what Alice?" 
Alice would repeat her 
message — and so on, 
far into the night 



Jeanette MacDonald, 
looking especiallylove- 
ly, celebrated with her 
constant escort, Bob 
Ritchie. Even on New 
Year's, snooping re- 
porters and curious 
cameramen interrupt- 
ed the merry-making 
to corner the couple 
and boldly inquire if 
they were married. 
But all they got for 
answers from Bob and 
Jeanette were laughs 
and side-long glances. 
Guess again ! Because 
they won't tell 



As Midnight 
Neared 



Noted ones paired at 
Hollywood's celebra- 
tion, New Year's Eve 



Staff Photos by William Phillips 




*<*» £*k 



fe> 









Judith Allen and John Warburton rang out the old, rang in the new, 

together at the Little Club. Rumors or no rumors (and there aren't 

any!), that's a come-hither glance in Judith's eyes, and Mr. 

Warburton looks as if he would like to accept the invitation 



L* V* 









Jack Oakie got back to 
Hollywood from Honolulu 
in time to celebrate with 
Hazel Forbes. Jack's grin 
is wide because "Skeets" 
Gallagher just thanked him 
for the gift he sent. It was 
a fifty pound rock, shipped 
collect to "Skeets" from 
Honolulu. Gallagher re- 
grets that the rock was too 
big to throw 



i » 



?r* 



iJW 






Nearly everyone has been 
asked to come up some- 
time, but here's the only 
man who is always wel- 
come! Mae West attends 
all celebrations with Jim 
Timony. Handy, too. Be- 
cause Jim's her business 
manager. And if any stray 
contracts should come wan- 
dering around, things could 
be settled there and then 



iO 



Star News 

from 

London 



By Kathlyn Hay den 

Photoplay's London Correspondent 







Adele Astaire broke up the famous dance team 

to marry Lord Cavendish. Now in the audience, 

she gives brother Fred stage fright 



London, England. 
'T I 'HIS face of mine!" 

That may not be the title of his auto- 
biography— if and when Fred Astaire gets 
around to writing it— but I can't think of 
a more apt one, and it's his for the taking. 

A half hour with him in his dressing-room at the 
Palace Theater (where he is playing to enthusiastic 
audiences of London's smart set in "Gay Divorce") 
has been far and away the most interesting high spot 
cf the month's news gathering. And it was what 
he had to say about his experiences in Hollywood 
that convinced me that the crudest caricaturist couldn't make 
the Astaire face as grotesque as Fred's own opinion of it. 

"I'm keen about this picture game," he said, "but I'm still 
wondering why anybody else should be keen about having me 
do my stuff before the camera. With this face of mine— !" 

He left the sentence unfinished— the shrug of his shoulders 
eloquently bespeaking what was on his mind.. 

"I'd have been even more flabbergasted when I got my first 
offer of a film engagement — if it hadn't come at a time when I 
was giving everything I had to my first stage appearance 
without my sister playing opposite me. As it was, I was so 
intent on convincing New Yorkers that I didn't depend on 
Adele for our show's success— and, in spite of unfavorable 
newspaper notices, we kept 'Gay Divorce' going for thirty-two 

76 



Fred can't understand why Hollywood wants him — with that face ! 
Astaire and his wife are in London where Fred is dancing 



weeks on Broadway— I didn't realize how amazing that offer 
really was. 

"I hadn't been in California since I was seven. Of course, 
I'd met a lot of picture people; they're all great theatergoers, 
you know. And I knew Crawford was a great little trouper. 
If she wanted me in the cast of 'Dancing Lady'— and the 
M-G-M people assured me she did— it was okay with me. 
At least it would be a great experience. 

""D UT my wildest imaginings had never pictured anything 
-Dlike the real Hollywood. In the ten weeks that I was 
there I was in a state of perpetual amazement. Up to that 
time I thought we had show business developed to the highest 
possible pitch of efficiency. It didn't take me long to discover 



that the big Hollywood studios start 
where we of the stage leave off. 

" Why, just to mention one instance, I 
learned more in those few weeks about 
make-up than in all my years behind 
the footlights. Those make-up experts 
are positively uncanny. I'm still gasp- 
ing as I think what they did with this 
face of mine. 

"They even put a toupee on my head 
— and to my amazement, when I saw the 
rushes, the wig on my photographed 
self looked more like my own hair than 
my own hair. Incidentally, I found out 
that several of Hollywood's champion 
heart -breakers — you know, the lads 
who always carry the heavy love interest 
— are similarly be-wigged. It isn't be- 
cause their own locks are thinning, it's 
because a make-up expert decides a 
toupee will heighten the effect of his 
work on their features. 

CRAWFORD was grand to work 
with. So were Gable and Tone. 
Of course, I didn't know a camera from 
a cow catcher. But, at least, I knew I 
didn't know. Also, I realized that 
everything I'd ever learned on the stage 
was of no use now. 

"That's what still bewilders me. 
Here I am— with this face of mine— and 
nothing much besides. Nobody'd ever 
accuse me of being a Caruso. As for my 
dancing — I've always felt that dancing 
on the screen as an exhibition is about 
the dullest part of any film. So, as far 
as I could make out, the only possible 
chance I had to get on in the picture 
game was to click — with my personality. 

"Something of that kind must have 
happened — or I shouldn't have been 
asked to work in 'Flying Down to Rio.' 
And now, as soon as this London run 



^mmmmmmmmmmmmKmmmmmmmmgmmBKF/lKti 



■ 



*•.<•..*,* ■* 




H 

"^*^^^ 



Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne went to London for " Reunion 
in Vienna." Back on native soil, Lynn was branded an alien 



As pretty a blonde as ever came from Holly- 
wood, is Marian Marsh. On her arrival in 
England, she had surprises for reporters 



ends, I'm off to Hollywood again — this time to 
make two pictures for RKO-Radio. The first 
will be 'Gay Divorce' — probably with Ginger 
Rogers in the Clare Luce role. 

"It's great, mind you — but still I can't under- 
stand it. With this face of mine — !" 

FRED ASTAIRE— by the bye— has had three 
nerve-racking experiences since the London 
premiere of "Gay Divorce." Three times his 
sister (Lady Cavendish as she is now) has been 
in front, watching her erstwhile partner do his 
stuff with the exotic Miss Luce. On each 
occasion, Astaire tells me, he suffered pangs of 
stage fright such as no actor ever knew. 

Those of you who have a brother or a sister 
may, perhaps, appreciate this. 1 can quite 
understand the dreadful self-consciousness a chap 
must feel under such conditions. 

HOW different the American viewpoint is 
from that of the general run of British film 
producers! Take the case of the company that 
produces the films [ please turn to page 112 ) 




rrculich 



IN each new picture Alice White looks a little sweeter 
and more subdued. Maybe marriage does that to a 
person! Or maybe Alice is growing up. However, 
there should be antics in her next movie, and maybe 
a swat or two. It's "The Heir Chaser," with Cagney 



78 



Hollywood, 

the World's 

Sculptor 



Remolded and reshaped, it's 
a wonder some of the stars 
can recognize themselves! 

By Winifred Aydelotte 



HOLLYWOOD is a quick-change artist. 
A gigantic sculptor, leaning over an immense 
bench, and the clay that responds to its long, sensitive 
fingers is the dramatic genius of the world. 
All anyone has to do to lose his individuality completely is 
to arrive in the City of Change with sufficient clamor. At the 
noise, the sculptor pricks up his ears and pounces on its victim 
with a good deal of glee. 

"A find! A find! ! The dramatic discovery of a decade! ! ! 





k 




"What lovely clay! " cried Hollywood, the sculptor, when Miriam 

Jordan arrived from England. But when the movies finished 

remaking her, Miriam didn't consider it a work of art 



" Nothing much you can do with a cyclone," 

the sculptor said of Lyda Roberti. For Lyda 

had found fame in jazz on Broadway and she 

didn't intend to have the mold changed 



Now listen, Tallulah, you slaved 'em with 
comedy in London. Well, forget it. You're 
going to be a bitter tragedienne here, tasting 
the dregs of life. And, you, what did you do in 
Roumania, my dear? You look so frail and 
sweet and charming. Oh — Lillian Gish things? 
Let's see, we have too many of them. I've got 
it! You will play stark, stiff maids and things 
in horror stories. And you, you cold, haughty, 
penthouse beauty. No, don't tell me. Let me 
guess. Well, never mind, we'll make you a 
bronco-bustin', wide-open-spaces, Western fe- 
male star." 

And so on. Hollywood is never at a loss. 
"You've got black hair? Bleach it. You've 
got blonde hair? Make it dark. I don't like 
your feet. I don't like your nose. I don't like 
your nerve. Change, change, change! " Dis- 
satisfaction with anything as it is is the mother 
of creation here. 

79 




"Unbend, girl, un- 
bend! " And Elissa 
Landi, quiet, re- 
served, obeyed the 
sculptor and unbent 
in a burst of activity. 
Then she rebelled 



A 



■:<**?-. 



Sometimes, however, 
the clay comes to Holly- 
wood with stubborn lines 
and a rigid refusal to be 
re-shaped. But it all comes, 
sooner or later, this great 
lump of genius — stage stars 
from New York and London; 
little movie-struck girls from 
Podunk and Terre Haute; in- 
genues from the country's stock 
companies, and the foreigners. 

What Hollywood has done to 
its foreign stars in the matter of 
re-vamping is miraculous, one 
way or the other. 

Marlene Dietrich, Anna Sten, 
Greta Garbo, Miriam Jordan, 
Lyda Roberti, Ramon Novarro, 
Elissa Landi, Dorothea YVieck, 
Greta Nissen. 

Already beautifully molded came Elissa Landi, a member of 
the Imperial Austrian nobility. She came, tall, cold, poised 
and dignified, and in her was (and is) embodied an Old World 
reserve, pride of tradition, an intellectual aloofness that forbade 
her yielding to the hail-fellow-well-met, up-and-down-the- 
emotional-scale, pillow-fighting school of acting that makes 
Hollywood the fascinating place of contrast it is. 

Eor Fox .she made "Bodv and Soul," "Alwavs Goodbye," 
"The Yellow Ticket," "Wicked," "The Devil's Lottery," 
"The Woman in Room 13," and "A Passport to Hell." All 
of these roles, in spite of the encouragement the titles gave, 
were Landi-reserved, emotionally distant and not quite on 
speaking terms with our red-blooded American expansiveness. 
They raised an enquiring lorgnette at the general public. 



ir 



s 



Eighteen months of artistic 
effort were spent by the 
sculptor on Anna Sten. In 
the meantime, Anna did 
things to Hollywood 



"Unbend, girl, unbend," cried Fox, who, 
basking in her intellectual shade, had be- 
come chilled to the bones. 

So she harkened unto the sculptor and 
unbent — in "The Warrior's Husband." 

"... and marble, soften'd into life, grew 
warm." 

This was followed by "I Loved You 
Wednesday," in which a startled public saw 
a Landi that cooed, gurgled, skipped, 
wrestled romantically over a pillow with 
Victor Tory, and couldn't say a word without 
waving her arms like a windmill and 
registering an overdose of wie de vivre. 

"Hooray!" shouted Fox, taking off 
muffler and wrist warmers, "she's human!" 
So they proudly presented her with "I Am 
a Widow," a story that demanded an 
asbestos screen. 

SHE took one look at the script, drew 
herself up into an ivory column of scorn, 
and departed. And the Landi retreat will 
go down in the annals of Hollywood history. 
The sculptor was wrong. It had tried to 
carve a skip and a simper into a cold curve 
of dignity. 

Marlene Dietrich, already an established 
actress in Germany, came to Hollywood, 
and the sculptor set to work. 

"In Hollywood," the studio said to Miss 
Dietrich, "the stars help in the matter of 
publicity. They keep themselves in the 
public eye; they do things that our press 
scribes can plaster on the front pages of 
newspapers; they do not lead quiet, 
uneventful, retiring lives. They at- 
tract attention! Now, let's see what 
you can do." 

Marlene flew to work, and 
never was a publicity job under- 
taken more seriously in the gag 
city than was hers. And every- 
thing helped her; Von Sternberg, 
her legs, and an article of ap- 
parel called pants. The innate 
puritanical streak of Americans 
helped, too. Unconsciously, 

[ PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 114 ] 




*r^ 



" I said scram! " The sculptor tried in vain to 

teach Benita Hume to use American slang without 

an English accent 



SO 



PHOTOPLAY'S 



H 



ollywoo 



d B 



eau 



ty Sh 



op 



Conducted By Carolyn Van W y c k 







IRENE BENTLEY'S lovely hands give 
I you a perfect pattern for correct nai 
shaping and use of lacquer polish 



RETAIN the natural lip outline for 
day make-up and reserve special 
lip shaping for evening," advises Mary 
Irian. Mary is using a new French 
lipstick ornamented with a sparkling 
stone. It comes in three smart tones 



All the beauty tricks of all the stars brought to you each month 



81 



Spotlight Coiffures by Bette 




HOW do you like the back of Bette's 
arrangement at the right? Isn't it a 
dream? Those rolls and flat curls have 
the sculptured beauty of marble. Not 
very difficult for your hairdresser either 

82 



N severa l scenes in 
"Fashions of 1934'" 
ette Davis wears her 
hair in this dramatic, 
exotic manner. It gives 
the color and sheen of 
her golden hair gor- 
geous play, but is advised 
only when you wish to 
seem slightly theatrical 



HERE Bette looks very 
queenly and almost 
Grecian with the classic 
simplicity of this coiffure. 
But wait until you see 
the back. It has tricks 
galore for you. A charm- 
ing suggestion for the 
younger person and sure 
to gain you compliments 




Davis in "Fashions of 1934 








THIS is a variation of 
the coiffure on the 
left page. Instead of the 
smooth effect, the hair 
has been softly waved 
and that roll brought 
forth in a bang. A uni- 
versally flattering style, 
especially for the girl 
with too much forehead 



FOR the style above, 
Bette's back hair has 
been metamorphosed 
into a mass of little curls 
across the back of her 
neck. This is a perfect 
ruse for the too long 
neck, and is girlish and 
lovely. Later you can 
turn those curls into rolls 



F you think Bette's circular roll on the 

opposite page is too much of a good 

thing, here it is in modified form. Just 

enough to be charming, different and 

refreshing. Don't you think it is nice? 

83 



M 



V 



J 



"¥*- 






A 



THRILLING tri- 
angle coiffure is 
worn by Gail Patrick. 
Every view is surprising 
and different. The side 
view, above, presents a 
mass of tight ringlets. 
The frontview, at lower 
right, shows you that 
this slant gives a very 
demure picture. Then 
the back, at lower left, 
is very lovely. Hair is 
slightly waved, the ends 
gently rolled, a jeweled 
band separating the 
curls. Try this for that 
next party and be a 
great success. This 
glamorous*coiffure, nat- 
urally, requires the skill 
of a good hairdresser 
but is wel I worth it 



8i 



(For More Beauty Tips 
Turn to Page 92) 



\\ 



I NEVER TIRE OF 



THE FLAVOR OF CAMELS 



MRS. JAMES RUSSELL LOWELL 



■ Mrs. James Russell Lowell loves 
sports, plays tournament tennis 
and bridge enthusiastically. Her Park 
Avenue home, which she decorated 
herself, has great distinction. She 
summers on Long Island with her two 
young children or in Europe, and 
divides her winters between Palm 
Beach and New York. She invariably 
smokes Camel cigarettes 

"THEY ARE SMOOTH AND MILD" 

"The taste of Camel cigarettes is 
always delicious — smooth and 
mild without being flat or sweet- 
ish. And they never get on my 
nerves — which I consider impor- 
tant," says Mrs. Lowell. "Natu- 
rally, I have other brands in the 
house, too, but most people agree 
with me in preferring Camels." 
People do seem to prefer a 
cigarette that doesn't make them 
nervous. That's why steady smok- 
ers turn to Camels. Camel's cost- 
lier tobaccos never get on your 
nerves no matter how many you 
smoke. And they always give you 
a cool, mild smoke. 

CAMELS ARE MADE FROM FINER, 
MORE EXPENSIVE TOBACCOS THAN 
ANY OTHER POPULAR BRAND 




cckf< 



Wtt&ZtC?Z><Z 



t>&ec<xf 




<z<ie 



Copyright, 1934, B. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company 





3yl Saint -L>< 



OULS 



• • • 








/tm\ 



& 




mi 


$\ 


ffw 


j 


L-^heeI 









ARE SOLD EXCLUSIVELY BY 

Stix, Baer & Fuller 

COMPANY 



As in Hollywood, so in Saint Louis! Look for 
"Hollywood Fashions". . . faithful copies of the 
smartest costumes worn by the most fashionable 
stars ... in stores of fashion leadership! Exact 
reproductions of the clever little frock worn by 
Marian Nixon in the Columbia picture/The Line 
Up" are being shown today in the resourceful 
store of the Stix, Baer & Fuller Company ... as 
in other stores of equal style reliance, in many 
key cities! "Hollywood" Fashions for March, 
sponsored by photoplay magazine and selected 
by Seymour, PHOTOPLAY'S stylist, are on display! 



OHHMMj 



THIS IS ^ GENUINE 

fj& M ffiO 

[HOLLYWOOD FASHIONJ | 



SELECTED t^^^^-$eq r*JltV I 

Only genuine Hollywood 
Fashions bear this label 



PHOTOPLAY MAGAZINE 



919 N. Michigan Ave. 



Chicago, 111. 



In Association with WAKEFIELD & O'CONNOR, INC. 



// "Hollywood Fashions" are not sold in your city, send 
PHOTOPLAY your name and address, mentioning- the 
department store from which you buy ready-to-wear. 



« 



I NEVER TIRE OF 



THE FLAVOR OF CAMELS 



MRS. JAMES RUSSELL LOWELL 



■ Mrs. James Russell Lowell loves 
sports, plays tournament tennis 
and bridge enthusiastically. Her Park 
Avenue home, which she decorated 
herself, has great distinction. She 
summers on Long Island with her two 
young children or in Europe, and 
divides her winters between Palm 
Beach and New York. She invariably 
smokes Camel cigarettes 

"THEY ARE SMOOTH AND MILD" 

"The taste of Camel cigarettes is 
always delicious — smooth and 
mild without being flat or sweet- 
ish. And they never get on my 
nerves — which I consider impor- 
tant," says Mrs. Lowell. "Natu- 
rally, I have other brands in the 
house, too, but most people agree 
with me in preferring Camels." 
People do seem to prefer a 
cigarette that doesn't make them 
nervous. That's why steady smok- 
ers turn to Camels. Camel's cost- 
lier tobaccos never get on your 
nerves no matter how many you 
smoke. And they always give you 
a cool, mild smoke. 

CAMELS ARE MADE FROM FINER, 
MORE EXPENSIVE TOBACCOS THAN 
ANY OTHER POPULAR BRAND 




C€k/< 



^Cce^Tu^ci 



tzeccrf 



&v€ 




Copyright, 1934, B. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company 





3yi Saint J^x 



OULS 












*i 




ARE SOLD EXCLUSIVELY BY 

Stix, Baer & Fuller 

COMPANY 



As in Hollywood, so in Saint Louis! Look for 
"Hollywood Fashions". . . faithful copies of the 
smartest costumes worn by the most fashionable 
stars ... in stores of fashion leadership! Exact 
reproductions of the clever little frock worn by 
Marian Nixon in the Columbia picture, "The Line 
Up" are being shown today in the resourceful 
store of the Stix, Baer & Fuller Company ... as 
in other stores of equal style reliance, in many 
key cities! "Hollywood" Fashions for March, 
sponsored by PHOTOPLAY MAGAZINE and selected 
by Seymour, PHOTOPLAY'S stylist, are on display! 



THIS IS A GENUINE 

i_6 



M 






\m ililywood fashion )! 

SELECTED E^^^^-^^. 

Only genuine Hollywood 
Fashions bear this label 



PHOTOPLAY MAGAZINE 



919 N. Michigan Ave. 



Chicago, 111. 



In Association with WAKEFIELD & O'CONNOR, INC. 



// "Hollywood Fashions" are not sold in your city, send 
PHOTOPLAY your name and address, mentioning the 
department store from which you buy ready-to-wear. 



Ask The A 



nswer 



M 



an 




Dick Powell doesn't look worried 
over the controversy going on 
among his admirers as to who 
should hold the title "most popular 
lad in musical pictures" 



LETTERS come from far and near asking 
about Bing Crosby and Dick Powell. 
Their popularity seems to be at a draw. 
Some admirers write in saying that Bing is 
handsomer and has a better voice than Dick. 
Others say, in no uncertain terms, that Dick 
has all the looks and the best voice. In sewing 
circles, at clubs and bridge parties, the question 
of the popularity of these boys seems to start 
a battle. Just who will come out on top is a 
puzzle. 

This old Answer Man has been called into 
the argument to say his little piece in defense 
of the lads, but really can't speak up for fear 
of getting a boot from either side. So he'll 
just sit back and wait to hear what you readers 
have to say about Crosby and Powell. Now 
for a short biography of the boys, which so 
many of you asked for. 

Bing — I mention him first because he is the 
elder — had a six months' start on Dick. They 
were both born in 1904; Bing on May 2nd, 
Dick on November 24th. Dick is 6 feet tall 
and weighs 177 pounds. Bing is three inches 
shorter and twelve pounds lighter. Dick has 
auburn hair, while Bing's is light brown. Both 
boys have blue eyes, although Bing's are much 
lighter than Dick's. 

Bing is from Tacoma, Wash. His real name 
is Harry Lillis Crosby. You'll have to put up 
your "dukes" if you ever call him by his 
middle name. He is married to Dixie Lee and 
has one son whom he calls Gary, after his pal 
Gary Cooper. Bing can't read a note of music, 
but he can play the drums and swings a mean 



Read This Before Asking Questions 

Avoid questions that call for unduly long an- 
swers, such as synopses of plays Do not inquire 
concerning religion, scenario writing, or studio em- 
ployment. Write on only one side of the paper. 
Sign your full name and address. Kor a personal 
reply, enclose a stamped, self-addressed envelope. 

Casts and Addresses 

As these take up much space, we treat such sub- 
jects in a different way from other questions. For 
this kind of information, a stamped, self-addressed 
envelope must always be sent. Address all inquiries 
to Questions and Answers, Photoplay Magaeine, 
22i \V. 57th St., New York City. 



cymbal. His favorite sports are golf and fish- 
ing. His latest pictures are " College Humor," 
"Too Much Harmony," and "Going Holly- 
wood." 

Dick is from Mountain View, Ark. His full 
name is Richard E. Powell. At this writing 
he is matrimonially fancy free. Can play a 
number of musical instruments. He spends 
his spare time playing golf and tennis. His 
latest pictures are "Footlight Parade," "Col- 
lege Coach," "Convention City" and "Won- 
der Bar." 

Martha Arnold, Bethel, Vt. — Yes, Mar- 
tha, the Phil Harris who played in the picture 
"Melody Cruise" is the same Phil Harris you 
hear over the radio. 

Dorothy Boyle, Fort William, Ont., 
Can. — Douglas Scott was the little fellow who 
played the role of Derek in "Devotion." 
Dickie Moore was Little Hal in "The Squaw 
Man." 

Eve Kirkman, Brooklyn, N. Y. — The role 
of Katharine Howard's lover in "The Private 
Life of Henry VIII" was played by Robert 
Donat. 

Anita Gamewell, San Benito, Tex. — 
Cary Grant was born in Bristol, Eng. He 
has brown eyes and black hair. Mae West, 
born in Brooklyn, N. Y., gives her birthday as 
August 17, 1900. You were almost right. 
Dick Arlen has blue-gray eyes. Warner Bax- 
ter has been married to Winifred Bryson since 
1917. 

Several Latin Women, Buenos Aires, 
S. A. — You girls have too many favorites for 
me to describe in this small space. However, 
here's the lowdown on lovely Jean Harlow. 
Jean was born in Kansas City, Mo., 
March 3, 1911. She is 5 feet, 3 inches tall, 
weighs 112 pounds and has platinum blonde 
hair and blue eyes. Her real name is Harlene 
Carpenter. She was married to Hal Rosson 
last September. If you want your other ques- 
tions answered, send a self -addressed envelope. 

Alice La Flamme, Holyoke, Mass. — 
Bruce Cabot's real name is Jacques Etienne de 
Bujac. He is married to Adrienne Ames. 
Alice, don't believe everything you read in the 
newspapers. I know it was reported that 
Ruby Keeler would desert the screen to be 
with her husband Al Jolson when he retired 
from pictures. But Al is so pleased with the 
way his picture "Wonder Bar" has turned 
out, that he has decided to stay in Hollywood 
and make several more. So you will be seeing 
more of Ruby, too. 

Ruby T. Howell, Tarboro, N. C. — Two 
versions of "Hold Your Man" were made. 




Bing Crosby, a contender, seems 
rather pleased that he is in on the 
right. The Answer Man wonders 
where the Rudy Vallee-Russ Col- 
umbo contingents are hiding 



In the first, Jean Harlow and Clark Gable were 
married by a colored minister. The other one, 
showing them being married by a white minis- 
ter, was made to replace the first version in 
States in which any controversy over the matter 
might arise. 

A Cavalier, Hackensack, N. J. — As you 
didn't give me your name or send a stamped 
envelope, I couldn't arrange to send you the 
Fan Club information. If you want a list of 
Fan Clubs, write to the Photoplay Association 
of Fan Clubs, 919 N. Michigan Avenue, Chi- 
cago, 111. -Each month, in the magazine, you 
will find up-to-the-minute news of the activities 
of various clubs. Watch for it. 

R.T.M., Buffalo, N. Y. — Yes, it is true that 
Janet Gaynor and Charles Farrell will make 
pictures together again. Charlie signed with 
Fox to make two pictures with Janet. I know 
how glad the Gaynor-Farrell admirers will be 
to hear this. 

Dixie Wenton, Little Rock, Ark. — The 
hats you mentioned were named after the 
actress and are still being made under her 
name. 

Helen Hutchins, Baltimore, Md. — Helen, 
you'll be seeing your old friend, Ronald Col- 
man, back on the screen once more. He is 
going to make "Bulldog Drummond Strikes 
Back" for 20th Century. For a second time, 
Loretta Young will be Ronnie's leading lady. 

87 



Took Out, Patricia P says Sylvia 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 73 



you have a wonderful complexion and will give 
you the disposition of a saint because you'll 
be so beautifully healthy. 

First thing in the morning, take a glass of 
cold water with the juice of half a lemon 
squeezed in it. 

Then have your luke warm shower (you can 
taper it off with cold water if you like) and 
fcrub your body with a good stiff brush and 
plenty of soap, working most vigorously on 
your spine. This increases circulation. Now 
have your first meal. 

Breakfast 

Two sliced oranges 

One coddled egg 

Three or four pieces of toasted rye wafers 

with a little butter and honey 
Coffee or tea — clear 

Eleven O'clock 

Glass of tomato juice 



Luncheon 

Big dish (and I mean big) of sliced, raw, red 
cabbage with an apple grated in it and 
just plain lemon juice on that. Eat as 
much of this as you can. 

Dish of fruit jello — no cream 

If you like it take a cup of tea with lemon, 
no sugar. 

Four O'clock 

Glass of orange juice 

Dinner 

One whole stalk of celery 

Cup of consomme with a tablespoon of 

chopped raw parsley in it 
One double lamb chop or an equal amount of 

any broiled meat 
Three tablespoons of fresh green peas 
Two heaping tablespoons of turnips 
One-fourth head of lettuce with a thin 



French dressing without much oil and a 
raw carrot grated on top 

( Eat salad with meat course) 
Raw fresh fruit and demi-tasse. 

There's a diet that won't put an ounce of 
weight on you but which is probably more 
than you're eating right now. You'll never 
starve on that diet and it also contains the 
valuable minerals you should have. It's a won- 
derful health builder and beautifier. 

And it will do something else for you, too. 
It will make you feel so good that when you 
smile, the corners of your mouth will turn up 
instead of down as they did sometimes in 
"Convention City." 

That's the end of the lecture, Patricia. 
Every word I've written you is true. And 
every word goes for other girls as well. I've 
done it for your own good. Hop on that diet 
wagon and those exercises right away. And 
the best of luck in the world to you. 
Yours, 

Sylvia. 



.nswers 



by Syl 



via 



Dear Sylvia: 

I wish you could tell me how to overcome 
self-consciousness. I'm so timid that it is 
painful for me to enter a room. 

A. A., La Junta, Colo. 

Technically this letter doesn't come in my 
department but I'm going to answer it, any- 
way, because I've got an answer for it. If you 
stay on my health diets, if you make your figure 
so lovely that you'll know you're the best- 
looking girl in your set, and if you learn to 
walk with your shoulders back, your stomach 
in and your head high you can't be self- 
conscious because you'll be sure of yourself. 
You'll know you're attractive! And that's the 
only way to overcome timidity — to know 
you're okay! 

My dear Madame Sylvia: 

Xow that wines and liquors are in I've been 
wondering if they're fattening. Almost every- 
where I go they serve wine with dinner and 
I don't know what to take. 

Mrs. R. H. T., New York City. 

Alcohol if taken in large quantities is fatten- 
ing. But so is food. The diet I've given you 
is moderate. Well, be moderate about your 
drinking, too, and a little wine with your meals 
won't hurt you. Don't overdo it — that's all. 

Dear Sylvia: 

My bust is large enough but I have a bony 
chest. I wish you could tell me how to cover 
up those bones. As a matter of fact, except for 
my bust, I'm slightly thin all over. 

B. D., San Antonio, Texas. 

Then the thing for you to do is to go on my 
building-up diet and exercises. If you don't 
have this information, send a self-addressed 
stamped envelope to me, care of Photoplay 
Magazine, 221 West 57th Street, New York 
City, and I'll send it to you. A lot of you thin 
girls have a large bust, but when you start to 
build up generally your bust won't become 
larger. Anyway, it's very fashionable to be 
large through the chest and don't be afraid 
that you'H put on any more weight there, 
because you won't. You're probably under- 
nourished and aren't eating the right foods. 

88 



MY, how the troubles come in — 
but how I like to see them! I 
know, you see, how I can make them 
disappear — so you'll understand why 
Aunt Sylvia says, the more the better. 
If you have a problem, I'll be glad 
to help if you'll just write, addressing 
your letter to Sylvia, care of PHOTO- 
PLAY Magazine, 221 West 57th 
Street, New York City. For a direct 
answer, enclose a self-addressed 
stamped envelope; otherwise watch 
these columns. No obligations what- 
ever, of course — I'm only too glad to 
help. 

SYLVIA 



Dear Sylvia: 

I took your reducing diets and exercises and 
they worked marvels. When I was just the 
weight I wanted to be I went back to eating as I 
had been before and put on three pounds in a 
week. What should I do about that? 

M. H., Sacramento, Calif. 

Shame on you! I'll bet I know exactly what 
you did. The minute you got down to the 
size you wanted to be you thought your 
responsibility was ended and you began to eat 
your head off. Well, you can't do it! I've an 
in-between diet — one that won't put flesh on 
but that keeps you at the right weight — 
which I'll send if you enclose the usual self- 
addressed, stamped envelope. 

Dear Sylvia: 

A friend of mine tells me that apples are 
fattening. I'm very fond of them but don't 
want to put on any more weight. 

Mrs. L. L., Tacoma, Wash. 

Maybe if you ate a dozen apples a day along 
with your regular meals they'd be fattening. 
But almost no fresh fruit is fattening and it is 
wonderful for your health. I recommend 
apples on many of my diets. A wonderful way 
to eat them is to grate them over sliced, raw, 
red cabbage and squeeze a little lemon juice 
over it. What a grand salad that makes! 



Dear Sylvia: 

I'm quite nervous and although I'm very 
careful about my diet and don't eat rich or 
highly seasoned foods, I feel uncomfortable 
right after every meal and then if I eat less I 
notice that between meals I feel faint and 
hungry. I'm trying my best to get over my 
nervousness, so please don't bawl me out 
about that. 

W. R. Y., St. Louis, Mo. 

I never bawl anybody out if I find that per- 
son is honestly trying to overcome a handicap 
and your letter sounds most sincere. You're 
just the sort of person I like to help best. 
Instead of taking three big meals a day take 
five light meals a day. This will aid your 
digestion and give your stomach something 
to be busy with all the time. Eat as little 
meat as possible. Eat plenty of fresh vege- 
tables and fruits and lots of grated carrots. 

My dear Madame Sylvia: 

I am sway-backed and I wish you would tell 
me how I can overcome it. 

B. T., Lexington, Ky. 

In the first place be thankful that you're 
sway-backed instead of stooped. You must 
learn to support yourself with your abdominal 
muscles. In this month's letter I've given 
Patricia Ellis a fine stomach exercise. Even 
if your stomach isn't very large that exercise 
will strengthen the muscles and help you 
correct your posture. Stand in front of your 
mirror and practice proper posture. 

Dear Sylvia: 

I am fifteen years old, with no weight prob- 
lem. But I love sodas. I drink lots. My 
mother tells me it will ruin my skin. What do 
you think? 

M. H. Reading, Penna, 

Your mother is right. Lay off sodas if you 
want a good skin. Since you have to have sugar 
for energy, take it in natural form, brown or 
unbleached sugar on your breakfast fruit — any 
kind but bananas. Include tomato and orange 
juice and plenty of fresh, green salads and fresh 
fruit in your diet. Take your milk in the middle 
of the morning instead of with meals. 



Photoplay Magazine for March, 1934 



8 9 








AVOID 
OFFENDING 

Underthings absorb per- 
spiration odor — protect 
daintiness this easy way . . 

No girl need ever be guilty of 
perspiration odor in under- 
things. Lux takes it away 
completely and saves colors! 
And it's so easy. 

But do avoid cake-soap rub- 
bing and soaps containing 
harmful alkali— these things 
fade colors, injure fabrics. 
Lux has no harmful alkali. 
Safe in water, safe in Lux. 



—for underthings 

Removes perspiration odor— Saves colors 



9° 



Photoplay Magazine for March, 1934 




S WHO 



no know this 





VEARS AGO My 
IOVELV SOUTHERN 
GRANDMOTHER 
FIRST TAUGHT 
ME THAT A GIRL 
WHO WANTS TO 
BREAK HEARTS 
SIMPLV MUST 
HAVE A TEA-ROSE 
COMPLEX 



!U 




SO MANY GIRLS have asked Irene Dunne 
how to make themselves more attractive . . . 
how to win admiration . . . romance. 

Here this lovely star tells you! And her 
beauty method is so simple . . . regular, 
everyday care with exquisitely gentle Lux 
Toilet Soap. 

Do follow her advice! See how much 
clearer, softer, lovelier your skin becomes 



YOU 



savs 



y* 



RKO-Radio Star 



. . . how that extra-lovely complexion wins 
hearts — and holds them! 

Nine out of ten glamorous Hollywood 
stars . . . countless girls the country over . . . 
have proved what this fragrant, white soap 
does for the skin. 

Is yours just an "average" complexion? 
Don't be content — start today — have the 
added beauty Lux Toilet Soap brings! 



m 



S.-r. 






can have 



the Ck 



arm men 



Photoplay Magazine for March, 1934 



9 1 



secret always win out 



n 







NOW THAT I'M ON THE SCREEN 
I REALIZE MORE THAN EVER THE 
FASCINATION THERE IS IN PEARLV- 
SMOOTH SKIN. I FOLLOW MV LUX 
TOILET SOAP BEAUTV TREATMENT 
REGULARLV EVERY OAV. 




Precious Elements in this Soap — 

<inVnricrc cav "Skin grows old-looking through the 
OL-lCllUSi:* **:' gradual loss of certain elements Nature 
puts in skin to keep it youthful. Gentle Lux Toilet Soap, so 
readily soluble, actually contains such precious elements — 
checks their loss from the skin." 



carf t r< 




How to Make Yo ur Eyes Lovely 

By Carolyn Van Wyck 




DOCHELLE HUDSON poses 
IN for us to illustrate Lilian Har- 
vey's unique method of making 
up her lashes. First, a tiny bit of 
cream is applied to the under 
side of upper lashes, these dusted 
with a little powder. Then the 
mascara is applied. Cream and 
powder give additional body to 
lashes. Suggested forextra heavy 
effect only 



THERE is hardly a player in Hollywood who 
hasn't lovely eyes — on the screen. It should 
be interesting and consoling to every reader to 
know that these lovely eyes often are a matter 
of clever make-up. For they, like the rest of us, 
are not all gifted with dark, thick lashes, with 
perfect shadow that nature gives one out of ten, 
or brows that are ideal frames for their eyes. 

First of all, every girl needs to take reason- 
able care of her eyes; to rest them when they 
are tired, not to strain them, and to use a good 
tonic or eye wash, in dropper or eye cup, when 
they are tired or have been exposed to wind and 
dust. 

There are three artifices upon which you may 
depend for external beauty. They are a good 
mascara or darkener, eye shadow and eyebrow 
pencil. These must be employed gently and 
subtly if you want true beauty without that 
made-up look. 

Right here, I should like to correct a wrong 
impression that may have come to some of you 
through adverse criticisms and comments on 
eyelash dyes. In some localities the sale of eye- 
lash dye has been banned because of a few cases 

92 



FOR depth and beauty, a 
touch of shadow to upper 
lids is necessary. Rochelle 
Hudson commentsthat 
brown is the least conspicu- 
ous of all tones. Use only 
on upper I ids; never beneath 



of eye injury that seemed to have resulted from 
the use of dye. But mascaras and darkeners 
are not dyes in any sense, and you have no need 
to fear good brands. This make-up aid, as you 
know, is merely a substance applied to the 
lashes for darker and heavier effect. And does 
it work wonders on lashes, especially on those 
that are scant or very blonde! 

Always use your mascara or darkener accord- 
ing to the instructions on the box. Remember 
that this advice has been worked out for you 
most carefully and will give better results than 
a careless method. 

Mascaras are very convenient because you 
apply them when you want, take them off when 
you want. They have developed to the stage 
today where they do not dry or make your 
lashes brittle, and many are water-proof so 
that you may see your favorite picture and 
weep, or walk in rain or snow without fear of 
the moisture ruining your eyes. You may also 
use this type when in swimming without fear 
of running or streaking. Cream seems to be 
the best way to remove the water-proof type. 
If your mascara is not water-proof, remove it 
with cold water. Always work very gently on 
the eyes; never scrub or handle them roughly. 

TN applying mascara, always brush upper 
-^-lashes upward and lower lashes downward. 
Hollywood often darkens its upper lashes with- 
out touching the lower ones. In the case of 
blondes, this often gives a beautiful effect to 
the eyes. If you have long lashes that droop 
slightly toward the outer eye ends, mascara 
them all lightly then make that outer end quite 
heavy. This will give you that unusual Garbo 
lash effect, and make your eyes appear longer. 
If you have the round Mary Brian type of eye, 
an even lash fringe is more flattering. 

In applying shadow, always use it lightly. 
The upper lid is the place. The color may 
extend lightly to the brow, but should be con- 
centrated just above the lashline. Tones arc 
most exotic, some flecked with gold or silver, 
which gives the lids a dewcy freshness. 

The eyebrow pencil is a great aid for brows 
and you may also do some nice things with it 
on the eyes, themselves. You can extend the 
outer corners just a bit and give yourself larger, 
longer eyes, or you can draw a light line on the 
lid just above the lashes before you darken 
them. Experiment carefully with your eye 
make-up to give your eyes just the touches 
they need for more beauty. 



EYES Like the Stars" is the 
newest leaflet we have 
worked out for you. It gives 
practical Hollywood hints 
for eye health and beauty 
and lists names of reputable 
products. Leaflets on skin, 
hair, home manicure and per- 
sonal daintiness are still avail- 
able. Simply send a self- 
addressed, stamped envelope 
to Carolyn Van Wyck, 
PHOTOPLAY Magazine, 
221 West 57th Street, New 
york City, for these or con- 
sultation on your personal 
beauty problems. 



Photoplay Magazine for March, 1934 



JOAN CRAWFORD 

and 

CLARK GABLE 

in Metro- Goldwyn- Mayer' 

"DANCING LADY 

Max Factor's Mate-Up Used 

Exclusively 




Learn How Screen Stars Create Roma?itic Beauty with 
HOLLYWOOD'S COLOR HARMONY MAKE-UP 



THE secret of beauty's attraction is color. This is the reason 
for the different appeals of blonde, brunette, brownette 
and redhead types. To emphasize this attraction, Max Factor, 
Hollywood's make-up genius, created color harmony make-up 
for each individual type. Every famous screen star knows this 
secret, and intensifies the charm and allure of her type with 



correct color harmony in face powder, rouge and lipstick. 
Natural beauty is emphasized with a color harmony that attracts. 

Now you may share this Hollywood secret. The luxury of 
color harmony make-up, created originally for the stars of the 
screen by their genius of make-up, is yours. See how Joan Crawford 
— illustrated below — creates her own color harmony make-up. 




POWDER 

. . . You 11 mari'el hoiv the color 
harmony tone of Max Factor's 
Face Powder actually enlivens 
the beauty of your skin. Match- 
less in texture, it creates a satin- 
smooth make-up that clings for 
hours. You ivill note the differ- 
ence instantly . . . One dollar. 




ROUGE 

. . . Created to screen star types, 
the color harmony tones of Max 
Factor's Rouge impart a fascin- 
ating, natural and lifelike glow 
to your cheeks. Creamy-smooth 
. . . like finest skin texture . . . 
it blends and clings just as you 
•would leant it to... Fifty cents. 




LIPSTICK 

...Super-Indelible, for in Holly- 
wood lip make-up must remain 
perfect for hours. Moisture-proof ~ 
too .. .you apply it to the inner 
surface also, giving a uniform 
color to the full lips. In color 
harmony tones to accent the ap- 
peal of lo'vely lips. . . One dollar. 



Society Make-Up...^^ Powder, Rouge, Lipstick in Color Harmony 



m 




1934 Max Factor 



Test YOUR Color Harmony f^ 
in Face Powder and Lipstick 

Just fill in coupon for purse-size box of powder in 
your color harmony shade and lipstick color tester, 
four shades. Enclose 10 cents for postage and 
handling. You will also receive your Color Har- 
mony Make-Up Chart and a 48-page illus. book, 
"The New Art of Socie